Amateur Artisan Bakers

GingerBloke

Clanker
Any you folks on here like to bake bread?
Wanna share tried and tested recipes.
I'm after a tried and tested cheese and onion sourdough recipe that works.

Cheers Ginge.
 

mrdude

War Hero
Any you folks on here like to bake bread?
Wanna share tried and tested recipes.
I'm after a tried and tested cheese and onion sourdough recipe that works.

Cheers Ginge.
Google and Youtube - you can get about any recipe you could want.
 
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Job jobbed. about five quid and no titting about, no washing up. More quality time to enjoy fine beverages with ones chums.
Trick is in life, stick to your own trade, chefs are chefs and they are good at it, regardless of our pi55taking. If your car breaks down do you chat to your mate who is a VM or the guy who looks after the Regi Goat?
Just go to the forking bakers bud, then just arrive home half hour early, whack the oven on and sprinkle a bit of flour about and look flustered.
You can do it with chinese too, buy it, bang it in the wok, chuck a Ken Hom book on the side, rub some grease on it it and.....hi baby done you a little tea!
Youth of today, no style ;););)
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I bake bread.

Never really progressed to sourdough. I attempted it once but my starter smelt like vomit and stank the whole house out.

I use the same basic recipe for everything then add or subtract ingredients depending on what I want.

700g strong flour. (White, brown or wholemeal depending on what I’m making)
400ml lukewarm water
7g (1 sachet) of yeast
tea spoon of salt
tea spoon of sugar
Good glug of olive oil, sesame oil or knob of butter

Additional ingredients that I sometimes chuck in:

Beer instead if water
Grated cheese
Nuts
Seeds
Fennel
Olives
Garlic

A firm favourite is wholemeal loaf with a load of cheese grated into it and dark ale instead of water.

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OneTenner

Old-Salt
I used to do a fair bit of baking, with bread the key thing to remember is to get the wet & dry balance right - practice your 'base' loaf mix to get it right - not just ingredients but temperature of ingredients & room - find a stable 'resting place' - no draughts or direct heat, and use a thermometer to check how accurate your oven temp. is - also a tray of water in the bottom of the oven is a good way of assisting the rise and ensuring a good crust. Seeds are dry so you can afford to have the dough slightly wet, tomatoes, cheese & onion are 'wet' so you need a slightly drier (firmer) dough otherwise the rise will be inhibited and the bread will be very dense. Homemade sourdough is a PITA unless you plan on doing it often and can keep the starter mix 'alive'. Live yeast is best if you do - or plan to do - a lot of bread baking, if not, the dried stuff is fine. Just remember that sugar feeds the yeast, salt kills it. Put the salt in a different place in the bowl to the yeast prior to mixing, sometimes a 1/2 teaspoon of caster sugar can make all the difference to the rise if you are planning on a savoury bread, also, check the water temperature, not too hot <28deg.C and not too cold >18deg.C
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Forgot a recipe!
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Skillingsbolle - a Norwegian bun made with an enriched dough
For the dough:-
150ml whole milk
125 melted unsalted butter
350g strong bread flour
75g caster sugar
7g dried yeast or 5g live yeast
5g salt
2tsp crushed cardamon seeds
mix together into a dough, knead on a lightly oiled board, rest in a bowl covered with cling film until doubled in size. Knock back and roll out into a rectangle about 8mm thick. Cover in a paste of 75g softened unsalted butter, 75g caster sugar, 75g groulnd almonds and two egg yolks. sprinkle with cinnamon powder and rasins to taste.
Roll up the dough from the long side and transfer to a tray, chill in the fridge for 20 mins then slice into ~2.5cm thick slices, place the slices on a lined baking sheet and cover with a tea towel, rest for an hour somewhere warm (~25deg.C.) - the skillingsbolle not you! then transfer to the fridge for another 20 mins.
Preheat the oven to 170deg.C fan, brush the skillingsbolle with warm whole milk, sprinkle with flaked almonds & sugar nibs & bake for ~15 - 20 mins until browned.
Cool on a rack and enjoy with anything you want!
 
Put the salt in a different place in the bowl to the yeast prior to mixing
Why doesn’t the salt kill the yeast when you mix it together?

Do you mix the dry together then add wet, or add the wet then mix?
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
Tesco in-store bakeries will give you fresh yeast for free. I mix a couple of ounces with some unpasteurised beer and strong white flour in a Kilner jar. Should be the consistency of single cream. I feed it for a couple of days with flour and stir it. Use in your favourite recipe. I get good consistency with it.
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Why doesn’t the salt kill the yeast when you mix it together?

Do you mix the dry together then add wet, or add the wet then mix?
It does, but if you put them both in the same place, the salt will kill off the yeast before it has chance to get started, if they are in different places in the bowl, they are 'introduced' to each other rather than having a stand-up fight. Adding the liquid depends on the bake, for an enriched dough, add everything to the bowl before mixing, for a batch loaf, i'd add the liquid to the dry ingredients as they are mixing, for a ciabatta , i'd add the dry to the wet. Dry flavourings are best added when neading, 'wet' are best added when mixing - minimise mechanical mixing with extra 'wet' ingredients so as not to break them up too much
 
I bake bread once or twice a week; I almost never buy it. The recipe is mostly the same, as @OneTenner says. It’s the basis of whatever I make, and alter it accordingly. I’ve posted it a couple times on “Tonight I cooked”.

Key things to me are:

Accuracy in measurement; I always use a digital scale.
Consistency in temp of the water, room and oven.
Consistency of timing - adjust by small amounts as necessary. I knead in the mixer for 10 minutes. First rise an hour. Second rise 40 minutes, then set the oven to temp, usually an hour overall. Bake time depends on loaf size. I should probably 1st rise a bit longer according to the perceived wisdom, but I get good results as-is.

@dingerr - I always put the water in the bowl first, then the sugar & salt, then the flour and any other dry ingredients, and then the yeast last.

Only rarely make sourdough, I don’t particularly care for it. And it’s a PITA to get the poolish going.
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Tesco in-store bakeries will give you fresh yeast for free. I mix a couple of ounces with some unpasteurised beer and strong white flour in a Kilner jar. Should be the consistency of single cream. I feed it for a couple of days with flour and stir it. Use in your favourite recipe. I get good consistency with it.
What quantity would you use to replace dried yeast?
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
What quantity would you use to replace dried yeast?
I made bread this evening and for 1.5 kg strong white bread flour I put in 2 cups of the goop plus warm water. This made 4 loaves. Whatever is left of the yeast mix can be fed to make the next batch over the course of a few days. I'm not particularly precise but the worst I've had happen is a dense loaf.
 

GingerBloke

Clanker
Cheers for all the replies and the bread porn ;)
I'm actually an ok baker just trying to get a really good sourdough cheese and onion loaf recipe.
I'm not using my sourdough as much now since I bought the book Flour, Water, Salt & Yeast by Ken Forkish.
Had some great results and tastes and now cook most of my breads in a dutch oven. Just wasn't getting the oven burst cooking in the oven.
I have put his recipes into a spreadsheet where you type in how many you want and it gives you the amounts if any one wants a copy PM me. There are links to his videos on youtube as well.
OneTenner: Gonna have to try the Skillingsbolle they look awesome
 

GingerBloke

Clanker
It does, but if you put them both in the same place, the salt will kill off the yeast before it has chance to get started, if they are in different places in the bowl, they are 'introduced' to each other rather than having a stand-up fight. Adding the liquid depends on the bake, for an enriched dough, add everything to the bowl before mixing, for a batch loaf, i'd add the liquid to the dry ingredients as they are mixing, for a ciabatta , i'd add the dry to the wet. Dry flavourings are best added when neading, 'wet' are best added when mixing - minimise mechanical mixing with extra 'wet' ingredients so as not to break them up too much
Thats a good bit of knowledge I have obtained, Cheers
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Thats a good bit of knowledge I have obtained, Cheers
Thanks to my Grandma for that info, it's one of the things I remember from her 'cooking lessons' on Sunday mornings:hungry: along with how to make Yorkshire Pudding properly!
 

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