Am I being scammed?

Awol

LE
When I get an iffy looking email purporting to be from a legit organisation, I always try and expand the sender's details to see the actual email address the email has come from. For example, the sender/header might be shown as 'Royal Mail' but expanding the details won't show me 'www.royalmail.com', it'll show something more suspicious like 'adefemi@zzxfpr.scammers.net' etc. Scammers rely on email recipients accepting emails at face value without looking too closely, so always dig a bit deeper and see what shows up. But don't open any links in the email body, obviously.
Oh, and I can thoroughly recommend First Direct as an alternative bank with negotiable levels of security (voice security being the main one), UK-based personnel and - from personal experience - a watchful eye on your account for unusual activity.
The email receipt from Wetherspoons came from orders@jdwetherspoon.co.uk which looks kosha to me.

Which is my original point. I’m fully aware that scammers use their own and probably disposable email addresses which any decent email account (ie Yahoo which I’ve used since about 1995) will just lob into the trash bin and I will never see them. All good.

If the dodgy emails do somehow get through, and if I do have any suspicions I will then always carefully check the senders email address to see if it’s real.

These email receipts that I referred to in my OP are different, in that they appear to be genuine in every way which means my card appears to have been skimmed .

I do have a local shop/convenience store that is a bit iffy and I’ve now resorted to only using cash there. However my problem is that I’m now in a catch 22 situation in that I cannot cancel my card as lost and stolen because they’ve blocked my phone banking service and the online facility (as I’ve explained upthread) is unusable, at least by me, because I’m only human.

I think the best bet is that I drain the account from a cashpoint so there is nothing left in there for them to steal, and then open an online account.

The curious thing is that whoever is actually using the card is only nicking £3 or £4 at a time, and then only at a intervals a month apart.
 

CC_TA

LE
Ignore all emails from "your bank" and other shops claiming you've spent money with them, unless you're expecting the email. The email should be correctly addressed to you and contain such things as the last 4 numbers of your account or credit card that you used.

Also check for spelling mistakes: sure sign of a scam.

Pop along to your branch and deal with them in person (or use an ATM to get a statement)....
Doesn't go for snail mail though. I recently got a naughty boy letter from 'Magistate's Court' they even got the spelling wrong on the letterhead and the return address.
I contacted them to see if it was a scam or they were just a bunch of tards. Turned out to be genuine they had just decided to remove the 'r' from magistrates.

Top tip; When invited to correct any errors on court papers, only do the corrections in simple black pen where requested.
DO NOT red pen the sh!t out of court papers criticising and correcting spelling. Also DO NOT give them 4/10 score in the bottom corner inviting them to 'See me later'.

...oh, and deffo double DO NOT write 'Would you like me to send you a large print dictionary with the fine payment?'
 

Dread

LE
I use Revolut for my day-to-day stuff.

In shops I only ever use my phone to pay for stuff (hold the phone to the payment device), as it cannot be 'skimmed' or used once the phone is locked, so any wánker trying to hold a payment terminal to my arrse or my wife's bag in the hope of nicking 30 quid is going to be seriously disappointed.

My metal card stays at home, safely out of range of scammers. About once a month I'll take it with me to take cash out from an ATM, and then it goes back in storage.

Online shopping is done with a one-time-use 'virtual' card, so while the online vendor could in theory screw me for the amount, the bástards can't sell my card details to anyone for further shopping as it is instantly void, and on the App I instantly get a new virtual card.
 

CC_TA

LE
I've started using a credit card that's paid off in full every month.

Any scammed money sorted in a couple of days, free insurance on a tonne of stuff, cashback, legal cover for fraud plus some air miles n similar stuff.
 

BlipDriver

War Hero
An alternative is that someone has an email that is similar to yours, and has entered the details incorrectly in their web browser or mobile app, which they only use intermittently & for small amounts. Each time they use it an email is generated that then goes to the holder of the "wrong" email address - you.

In the past week I've received emails intended for others from a Worcestershire tradesman & the AA, both were legitimate but in each case the sender put in the wrong details so they came to me.

Can you get a mini-statement from a local non HSBC cashpoint? I haven't done this for a while so don't know if you still can, but have done in the past.

Finally I can suggest avoiding Santander like the plague, as their levels of customer service are terrible. I can't pay cash into t'other half's account with her card despite being able to prove that I live at the same address; also a friend's daughter has had her account frozen for two months - no access to wages etc., because of an unknown transaction - £2500 frozen over £30 deposit she can't identify.
 
If the dodgy emails do somehow get through, and if I do have any suspicions I will then always carefully check the senders email address to see if it’s real.
Don't just rely on that; I understand that it's not too challenging for someone to spoof an email address so it looks real.

An alternative is that someone has an email that is similar to yours, and has entered the details incorrectly in their web browser or mobile app, which they only use intermittently & for small amounts. Each time they use it an email is generated that then goes to the holder of the "wrong" email address - you.
You usually have to 'confirm' that the email address belongs to you when you associate it with your account - before it would be sending all these notifications.
 
My cards are kept in a wallet with an integral RFID shield in it.
I have a similar arrangement .

I also have setup on both my Credit Card and Debit Card the option to be advised by Text Message , normally within minutes , of whenever I make a purchase .
 

Awol

LE
An alternative is that someone has an email that is similar to yours, and has entered the details incorrectly in their web browser or mobile app, which they only use intermittently & for small amounts. Each time they use it an email is generated that then goes to the holder of the "wrong" email address - you.

In the past week I've received emails intended for others from a Worcestershire tradesman & the AA, both were legitimate but in each case the sender put in the wrong details so they came to me.

Can you get a mini-statement from a local non HSBC cashpoint? I haven't done this for a while so don't know if you still can, but have done in the past.

Finally I can suggest avoiding Santander like the plague, as their levels of customer service are terrible. I can't pay cash into t'other half's account with her card despite being able to prove that I live at the same address; also a friend's daughter has had her account frozen for two months - no access to wages etc., because of an unknown transaction - £2500 frozen over £30 deposit she can't identify.
Thanks. As far as I’m aware the mini-statements are from cash points that belong to the actual branch they are fitted to.

In other words one could get a mini statement from the machine, or one could walk into the bank behind the machine and get a full blown statement from a cashier.

I have never understood this. If the machine can check one’s balance by talking somehow to the bank involved, maybe 30 miles away, it can also presumably ask for a statement too.
 

Awol

LE
Doesn't go for snail mail though. I recently got a naughty boy letter from 'Magistate's Court' they even got the spelling wrong on the letterhead and the return address.
I contacted them to see if it was a scam or they were just a bunch of tards. Turned out to be genuine they had just decided to remove the 'r' from magistrates.

Top tip; When invited to correct any errors on court papers, only do the corrections in simple black pen where requested.
DO NOT red pen the sh!t out of court papers criticising and correcting spelling. Also DO NOT give them 4/10 score in the bottom corner inviting them to 'See me later'.

...oh, and deffo double DO NOT write 'Would you like me to send you a large print dictionary with the fine payment?'
I once sent a previous OC a letter addressed (because of his appalling spelling) to “The Illiterate Twàt” at XYZ camp etc.

Would this have been unwise?
 
Dear kindly folks,

(I couldn’t find a more appropriate forum for this, so I’m dropping it into the Naafi. Mods please feel free to move it if there is somewhere better etc etc).

The other day I was picking through my (Yahoo) email inbox just to check that there was nothing there that I’d missed, when lo and behold, I came across two email receipts from the Trainline.com dated 7th March this year. As I haven’t used a train for about two years, I knew something was a bit iffy. The amounts though were tiny, about four quid each from Bristol Temple Meads to Oldfield Park (and back again).

I decided that If someone has skimmed my debit card and might just be testing the water so to speak, before taking my financial portfolio of a massive £66, the easiest thing was to report it as fraud to HSBC and maybe get a new card.

I called the proper number and the call operator sounded very much like she was in the centre of an open air cattle market somewhere (which knowing about HSBC staff cuts recently, may have actually been the case).

Eventually I asked her to speak very slowly, which she kindly did and I explained the situation. I went through the usual security questions and then she said that my telephone banking account had been locked for security reasons. I patiently explained that I had never used telephone banking in the entire three years that I had been with HSBC. In essence then, because of security issues, I was unable to report my security issues.

I then made a very rapid decision to move banks that very same day and to go to the TSB. I made a very lengthy phone call to them and they were due to ring me back on Wednesday for a 90 minute (huh?) phone call for me to give them my HSBC account number and sort code, so they can ‘seamlessly’ transfer my direct debits etc.

Except of course they didn’t call.

Then, this morning, I checked my emails again and now I found a couple of email receipts from Wetherspoons for, again, about four quid each, for chocolate fudge cake, this time in Bath. Both Bristol (Trainline tickets) and Bath being very local to me.

I wouldn’t mind, but I didn’t even get the chocolate fudge cake.


The million dollar question now is….. are these real emails from the real companies concerned (which seems likely given their proximity to me, but which also means that my account is being dipped into), or is it just a scammer who is generating fake emails to get me to click on something nefarious that is within the email? (I have to admit that I had already clicked on the Trainline tickets to see the details of the journey).

I don’t know, but I’m hoping there is someone out there in Arrseland who can advise accordingly.

There is a simple explanation.


Have you seen the film Fight Club?


You are schizophrenic. Your other half is blowing your cash while you think you are sleeping.
 

BlipDriver

War Hero
Don't just rely on that; I understand that it's not too challenging for someone to spoof an email address so it looks real.


You usually have to 'confirm' that the email address belongs to you when you associate it with your account - before it would be sending all these notifications.
Good point well made, don't do contactless or payment by phone so hadn't considered that. What about payments as a guest? When I've occasionally checked out as a guest they ask for email but don't confirm it.
 
Finally I can suggest avoiding Santander like the plague, as their levels of customer service are terrible. I can't pay cash into t'other half's account with her card despite being able to prove that I live at the same address; also a friend's daughter has had her account frozen for two months - no access to wages etc., because of an unknown transaction - £2500 frozen over £30 deposit she can't identify.

I had an account with Abbey National from 1978 and it eventually became Santander. I've had no problems at all with them and am fully satisfied with the customer service - deposits, transfers, number of branches there are and the free debit card. There are no charges for the account either.
 

fourteen2two

Old-Salt
We have a Santander 123 current account which pays interest and cashback,on debits which exceed the small monthly fee.The app and online system work fine.
We have had no issues with HSBC either. The phone app works very well and informs us of transactions.
Luckily both banks still have branches in town who are very helpful.
 
If you tap (or right-click?) on the sender’s email address, it should tell you who it’s really from.
edit: businesses often get bogus invoices which chancers send out hoping that a busy department will just pay it.
 

smallbore

Old-Salt
For the last five years or more I have had on-line banking with NatWest, Lloyds, Barclays and HSBC all at the same time (personal accounts, business accounts, club/association accounts).

My views are;
Avoid HSBC like the plague, lousy on line product and they have shut all their branches.
Lloyds is the best, both on-line and in branch, Barclays a close second.
 

anglo

LE
Dear kindly folks,

(I couldn’t find a more appropriate forum for this, so I’m dropping it into the Naafi. Mods please feel free to move it if there is somewhere better etc etc).

The other day I was picking through my (Yahoo) email inbox just to check that there was nothing there that I’d missed, when lo and behold, I came across two email receipts from the Trainline.com dated 7th March this year. As I haven’t used a train for about two years, I knew something was a bit iffy. The amounts though were tiny, about four quid each from Bristol Temple Meads to Oldfield Park (and back again).

I decided that If someone has skimmed my debit card and might just be testing the water so to speak, before taking my financial portfolio of a massive £66, the easiest thing was to report it as fraud to HSBC and maybe get a new card.

I called the proper number and the call operator sounded very much like she was in the centre of an open air cattle market somewhere (which knowing about HSBC staff cuts recently, may have actually been the case).

Eventually I asked her to speak very slowly, which she kindly did and I explained the situation. I went through the usual security questions and then she said that my telephone banking account had been locked for security reasons. I patiently explained that I had never used telephone banking in the entire three years that I had been with HSBC. In essence then, because of security issues, I was unable to report my security issues.

I then made a very rapid decision to move banks that very same day and to go to the TSB. I made a very lengthy phone call to them and they were due to ring me back on Wednesday for a 90 minute (huh?) phone call for me to give them my HSBC account number and sort code, so they can ‘seamlessly’ transfer my direct debits etc.

Except of course they didn’t call.

Then, this morning, I checked my emails again and now I found a couple of email receipts from Wetherspoons for, again, about four quid each, for chocolate fudge cake, this time in Bath. Both Bristol (Trainline tickets) and Bath being very local to me.

I wouldn’t mind, but I didn’t even get the chocolate fudge cake.


The million dollar question now is….. are these real emails from the real companies concerned (which seems likely given their proximity to me, but which also means that my account is being dipped into), or is it just a scammer who is generating fake emails to get me to click on something nefarious that is within the email? (I have to admit that I had already clicked on the Trainline tickets to see the details of the journey).

I don’t know, but I’m hoping there is someone out there in Arrseland who can advise accordingly.
email receipts from Wetherspoons

Ask yourself, How did Wetherspoons get your email address?

Any method of card payment doesn't give out your Email address
It's a frecking scam, FFS, just delete the emails

EDIT, they know your email is live, the first try {scam} didn't work, so they are trying again
 

endure

GCM
I’m fully aware of scam emails and they normally obvious but there’s something about these receipts that makes me uneasy. I’ve just been looking at Starling Bank which was recommended to me, and I might sign up there if I can.
I've got a Starling account and they're quite slick. Another bank you might want to consider is Chase who've recently opened up in the UK. You get 1% cashback on spends for the first year.

If you agree to round up any purchases to the nearest £ they stick it into an account that earns 5% for the first year too.

They've also got a linked saving account which pays 1.5%.

You sign up online. The only hassle is that you have to take a photo of some sort of doc with a picture of you on it (driving licence, passport) and then take a selfie. That's how they check you're who you say you are.
 

anglo

LE
The email receipt from Wetherspoons came from orders@jdwetherspoon.co.uk which looks kosha to me.

Which is my original point. I’m fully aware that scammers use their own and probably disposable email addresses which any decent email account (ie Yahoo which I’ve used since about 1995) will just lob into the trash bin and I will never see them. All good.

If the dodgy emails do somehow get through, and if I do have any suspicions I will then always carefully check the senders email address to see if it’s real.

These email receipts that I referred to in my OP are different, in that they appear to be genuine in every way which means my card appears to have been skimmed .

I do have a local shop/convenience store that is a bit iffy and I’ve now resorted to only using cash there. However my problem is that I’m now in a catch 22 situation in that I cannot cancel my card as lost and stolen because they’ve blocked my phone banking service and the online facility (as I’ve explained upthread) is unusable, at least by me, because I’m only human.

I think the best bet is that I drain the account from a cashpoint so there is nothing left in there for them to steal, and then open an online account.

The curious thing is that whoever is actually using the card is only nicking £3 or £4 at a time, and then only at a intervals a month apart.
Have they actually taken any money from the account,
 
email receipts from Wetherspoons

Ask yourself, How did Wetherspoons get your email address?

Any method of card payment doesn't give out your Email address
It's a frecking scam, FFS, just delete the emails

EDIT, they know your email is live, the first try {scam} didn't work, so they are trying again
If you use the witherspoon app it will send you an email receipt.
 
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