Alternatives to the Military?

I suppose the message is persistence, or defiance? Am I close enough? A google search never helped much, other than the myth dates back to 1930's.
More if you don't try, you definitely won't succeed attitude. I thought the Ayatollah's comment was a very negative one, but then my glass has always seemed more than half full. You're looking for advice on what you wish to do in life, not obstacles placed in your path. Although one of the vertically challenged, 5'4,'' I've served with that rifle way back. I've stood (laughs) my ground during that time and in civvy street afterwards. Always decided what I wished to do, against well intentioned advice in some cases. No regrets. Follow your dreams. Good luck.
 

Abc173

Clanker
More if you don't try, you definitely won't succeed attitude. I thought the Ayatollah's comment was a very negative one, but then my glass has always seemed more than half full. You're looking for advice on what you wish to do in life, not obstacles placed in your path. Although one of the vertically challenged, 5'4,'' I've served with that rifle way back. I've stood (laughs) my ground during that time and in civvy street afterwards. Always decided what I wished to do, against well intentioned advice in some cases. No regrets. Follow your dreams. Good luck.
Well that's it. You can only crack on. I'm not crying over it, as much as I would have loved to have enlisted. It was a long path for me; I had to shift 4 stone first and build my fitness from simply not fit to army fit (or 1.5 miles in 11 minutes). That took time. Then I get my diagnosis and the path I was on has been ripped from under me. So, I just had to regather and assess, and (because why not) consult a forum.
 
Well that's it. You can only crack on. I'm not crying over it, as much as I would have loved to have enlisted. It was a long path for me; I had to shift 4 stone first and build my fitness from simply not fit to army fit (or 1.5 miles in 11 minutes). That took time. Then I get my diagnosis and the path I was on has been ripped from under me. So, I just had to regather and assess, and (because why not) consult a forum.
Although not a regret, at the time them were the rules, I did fail on one job prospect I had my eye on. I wished to be a policeman!! With my height, or lack thereof, no *chance! Having a weird sense of humour, I did think when they changed the height restriction, too late for me.

* with all these different claims going in for past discrimination against LGBT+ letters, **female members of the forces discharged if pregnant and later being compensated, does anyone think I may have a case for being a shortarrse and denied my lifelong ambition of becoming a police officer? I thought not.

**there were only two genders available then.

Sorry for slight drift. Wishes remain the same.
 

Abc173

Clanker
Although not a regret, at the time them were the rules, I did fail on one job prospect I had my eye on. I wished to be a policeman!! With my height, or lack thereof, no *chance! Having a weird sense of humour, I did think when they changed the height restriction, too late for me.

* with all these different claims going in for past discrimination against LGBT+ letters, **female members of the forces discharged if pregnant and later being compensated, does anyone think I may have a case for being a shortarrse and denied my lifelong ambition of becoming a police officer? I thought not.

**there were only two genders available then.

Sorry for slight drift. Wishes remain the same.

It seems like a daft rule, though. Or at least to me it does. A reasonably fit and healthy, and strong 'shortarrse' should be able to handle themselves really. Or at least I would think so.
 
Unlucky - I've developed a good old bloat as I've got older with certain things that's probably nowhere near proper coeliac, so you have my sincere sympathies.

I'd be looking at a number of things but it might take a fair stretch of low pay and some interesting lifestyle choices for a bit but get on the ladder instructing outdoors sports - climbing, skiing, guiding, windsurfing, diving, etc... - think of all the things the military provide as Adventure Training, there's a good reason they do so, and to be Frank, it's good fun too.

It'll take time and experience but aim for internationally recognised qualifications and you could have a real hoot. Choose a balance of summer & winter sports - also look at the less popular things which can bizarrely make you more employable. We had loads of Alpine ski instructors in my mob so there was always lots of competition get down to the Chalet/Lodge and spend some time there - there were very few Nordic instructors (even fewer with both quals) as it was seen as boring, strenuous and you'd have less time being a piste god stuck on the flat - but those guys (i.e. me) would be requested for the whole season not fighting for a single course.

Won't be quick or easy though, and you'll be very much on your own - however, given that people might have to be spending a lot more time out doors for fitness reasons, well, it might be worth a punt.

Developing people, especially in those environments, is very rewarding. you'll be working physically and mentally and you could end up in some really odd interesting places down the line with some every interesting people.

Just an idea. Hope it works out for you.
Replying to one's own posts is always fun...

This came through to me recently - this is the sort of thing you could look at down the line of an AT route after getting decent quals.


British Antarctic Survey is offering a unique opportunity as Field Guide in Antarctica.
Field Guides will assist scientific colleagues carrying out research in the polar environment whilst ensuring all fieldwork and travel is carried out safely and efficiently. Of course, you'll also have to attend to many other duties, including assisting aircraft operations, organising campsites, operating radio equipment and ensuring vehicles continue to work.
Practical, organised and unflappable, you'll have what it takes to work in the most challenging climate on Earth - enabling us to conduct successful scientific research across Antarctica.
Extensive experience of alpine mountaineering (Europe, or elsewhere) is a prerequisite. Winter Mountaineering and Climbing Instructor, Mountaineering and Climbing Instructor are desirable.
Applicants should be active mountaineers (climbing, not hill walking) with at least five years’ experience of leading routes, during which they have done at least the following (or equivalent experience):
Climbed more than 20 multi-pitch rock routes at the following grades or above: UK 5a/USA 5.7/UIAA V-/Australia 14.
Climbed 10 multi-pitch winter/mixed routes at Scottish Grade 3 or above, or equivalent.
Climbed 5 alpine routes on mixed and glaciated terrain at PD or above, in Europe or elsewhere (rock routes do not apply). Significant ski-mountaineering trips on glaciated terrain may be considered as a substitute.

Who we are
British Antarctic Survey (BAS) delivers and enables world-leading interdisciplinary research in the Polar Regions. Our skilled science and support staff based in Cambridge, Antarctica and the Arctic, work together to deliver research that uses the Polar Regions to advance our understanding of Earth as a sustainable planet. Through our extensive logistic capability and know how BAS facilitates access for the British and international science community to the UK polar research operation. Numerous national and international collaborations, combined with an excellent infrastructure help sustain a world leading position for the UK in Antarctic affairs. British Antarctic Survey is a component of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). NERC is part of UK Research and Innovation www.ukri.org
We employ experts from many different professions to carry out our Science as well as keep the lights on, feed the research and support teams and keep everyone safe! If you are looking for an opportunity to work with amazing people in one of the most unique places in the world, then British Antarctic Survey could be for you. We aim to attract the best people for those jobs.
If you want to know more about this role, please visit our website: Field Guide - British Antarctic Survey

If you have any questions, please contact Cécilia Lemaire: cecair@bas.ac.uk


Please do not hesitate to share with your network.
We hope to hear from you.
Best wishes,
HR Team
 

The_Poltroon

Old-Salt
I have been diagnosed with coeliac disease which means my ambitions to join the army have been forced out the window. Fair enough given the circumstance, because if I fell ill I would be a hinderance. It's still a bit gut wrenching (no pun intended) though because you work hard towards a goal and then suddenly your intestines decide that gluten is the devil. I'm trying to sound slightly humorous but it is a bit of a blow. I can't dwell, I just need to accept the cards that have been dealt and crack on even if it is a bit of a spanner in the woodworks. The problem is, I have no idea what I want to move on to do next.

I like the ideas of discipline, and structure, having a bit of organisation in my life, and a bit of meaning and purpose that brings some job satisfaction with it (are some of you laughing at that?).

None of you can pick for me, I get that. Any suggestions wouldn't hurt though! Some food for thought, something that gets the brain ticking away for new ideas and direction. I suppose that's what I felt I instantly lost, a bit of direction, I was going somewhere, and now I'm not.

I did look at the national careers service. Some obvious ones were the Police, Bodyguarding/Close Protection (it was a stand out but it looks very competitive and without military experience I can pretty much forget about hostile environment work), other various security work. I considered the RFA but their roles aren't as varied and don't appeal to me as much.

Any suggestions greatly appreciated folks!

Thanks in advance.

Also, if it helps, my intended path was combat roles such as Infantry and Guardsman. So it's not as easy as 'If I wanted to be an Army medic then be a civvy medic instead' unfortunately.
Don't join the Police force thinking that it is going to be in any way similar in ethos or camaraderie to the Army just because they have a rank structure and you get to wear a uniform.

You're little more than a social worker and you'll find that your colleagues will happily grass you up to your shift sergeant (sorry.... line manager as they like to be called now) for even the tiniest politically incorrect comment you may make in their presence and hearing as you plough your way through your daily huge pile of unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Have you considered just shooting people for free? If you're any good, it comes with many of the same benefits and drawbacks as the military. Lifetime of service, free accommodation, subsidised food, lack of freedoms, bureaucratic hierarchy micro-manging your every day, and so on. Different uniforms and the pay's not great, but those change pretty regularly in the Army too.

Apply via the CPS or HM Police. If you have the correct credentials, they even seek you out.

(bad luck, but remember to keep your chin up!)
 

Latest Threads

Top