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Alternative titles for Second Lieutenant

#1
I understand that the British Army has replaced the titles "Cornet" and "Ensign" with "Second Lieutenant."

I think, though, that one Regiment of the Household Cavalry still uses "Cornet," and that some Household Guards Regiments still use "Ensign."

Can anybody tell me which units still use "Cornet" or "Ensign" instead of "Second Lieutenant?"
 
#2
HCR are Cornets, Ensign I can't think of any. Maybe the Cav, they are a weird bunch.

In my Corps' we replaced Second Lt with the affectionate term (most fo the time) "Sproggy Officer".
 
#5
Lts & 2Lts in the RHG/D (Blues and Royals) are Cornets. An ensign is a 2Lt/Lt in the Foot Guards. They are referred to on Trooping the Colour as it is often the youngest Ensign who troops the colour!
 
#6
Pretty sure that cornet is used by some of the cavalry. We had a cavalry cadetship at NUOTC - QRIH as I recall, in the early 1980s who insisted on being called a cornet: with that and his side hat he spent a fair time being pursued by the peasantry humming either the thunderbirds theme or the theme from the Wall's ice cream cornetto ads.
 
#13
Thank you all for some fascinating answers and also for some amusing signatures. It's interesting to see the nicknames as well as actual titles.

In the U. S. Coast Guard and U. S. Navy, entry-level officers are Ensigns.

In the U. S. Air Force, U. S. Marine Corps, and U. S. Army, they are Second Lieutenants.

Older Air Force NCO's refer to Second Lieutenants as "shavetails," because in early days of ore mining, new mules had their tails shaved. By the time the hair grew back, they were experienced rather than new.

Some military members refer to a new officer as "Butter Bar" because of their single gold bar.

In the U. S. Navy or U. S. Coast Guard, all officers below the rank of Commander (equivalent of Lieutenant Colonel) are called "Mister" when spoken to.

As a courtesy, Lieutenant Commanders may be addressed as "Commander," but they would refer to themselves as "Mister."
 
#14
The ranks of Ensign and Cornet are obsolete - apart from in the Guards and the Household Cavalry. I'm not sure when it changed, but they were re-branded as 2nd Lieutenants in infantry and cavalry regiments certainly before the Great War.
 
#16
To the very best of my limited knowledge, and with the help of our friend wiki, following the reforms of 1871: cornet is now only used by the RHG/D (Blues and Royals) and Queen's Royal Hussars; ensign is limited to the Foot Guards, and the two officers from any infantry battalion chosen to carry their Queen's and Regimental Colours (hence also the rank of Colour Sergeant) on a formal parade. I am ready and willing to stand corrected.
 
#17
Teech said:
To the very best of my limited knowledge, and with the help of our friend wiki, following the reforms of 1871: cornet is now only used by the RHG/D (Blues and Royals) and Queen's Royal Hussars; ensign is limited to the Foot Guards, and the two officers from any infantry battalion chosen to carry their Queen's and Regimental Colours (hence also the rank of Colour Sergeant) on a formal parade. I am ready and willing to stand corrected.
Only on one item and that is Coronet as in crown not Cornet as in "give it to meeeeeeeee."
 

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