Allied use of zimmerit

Just watching a programme on Yesterday about the battle of Caen and shows footage of comet tanks which appear to have a finish similar to the German anti magnetic zimmerit paste anyone e seen this before it's a new one on me
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Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
It might possibly be a rubber like application I remember reading somewhere that they experimented with it. those are Cromwells I think not Comets, which does link with this ". Following the war, the British carried out trials of a similar material on Churchill and Cromwell tanks and some trials were conducted in Canada with a similar material applied to self-propelled guns[4] but it was not implemented. No similar material was used on post-war tanks as the widespread use of man-portable HEAT rockets such as the Bazooka made magnetic mines obsolete. "

The Comet doesn't have the rivets like the Cromwell
 
You got a Div symbol for it?
I ask as we have names for the tanks so it shouldn't be to hard to track down.

The Tac markings seem to imply its a guards unit, but those are hardly a good way of ID'ing the unit! Especially as the Guards didn't get Cromwell's.
 
Now you mention it I can remember something about rubber application seems a waste of a scarce material that would have been better used for tyres but 2nd pic does seem to show the coating hanging down over the bottom of the turret
 
You got a Div symbol for it?
I ask as we have names for the tanks so it shouldn't be to hard to track down.

The Tac markings seem to imply its a guards unit, but those are hardly a good way of ID'ing the unit! Especially as the Guards didn't get Cromwell's.
No clip said the CLY heading into Villers Bocage
 

Good spot OP.
It's amazing, you spend decades reading stuff and there is always something new.
 
Just watching a programme on Yesterday about the battle of Caen and shows footage of comet tanks which appear to have a finish similar to the German anti magnetic zimmerit paste anyone e seen this before it's a new one on meView attachment 429358View attachment 429352View attachment 429354View attachment 429355View attachment 429356View attachment 429357View attachment 429358
I think they're rubber strips. One of the tanks looked like it might have been called "Galahad", so taking that as a basis, I squinted heavily at the the stripey tank and thought it might have been "Agamemnon" (IIRC, Capt Sheridan's last command before Babylon V?).

Cromwell Mk.IV “Agamemnon” with rubber stripes, 3rd Northamptonshire Yeomanry, 11th Armoured Division, Normandy, 1944.



 
I think they're rubber strips. One of the tanks looked like it might have been called "Galahad", so taking that as a basis, I squinted heavily at the the stripey tank and thought it might have been "Agamemnon" (IIRC, Capt Sheridan's last command before Babylon V?).

Cromwell Mk.IV “Agamemnon” with rubber stripes, 3rd Northamptonshire Yeomanry, 11th Armoured Division, Normandy, 1944.






"Cromwell with rubber strips glued onto its turret to prevent magnetic-anti-tank weapons from sticking."
 


"A REME sergeant welding damaged armour on a Cromwell tank of 2nd Northamptonshire Yeomanry, at 29th Armoured Brigade workshops, 11th Armoured Division, 8 August 1944."

 

4(T)

LE
I think it must have been obvious even early in the war that anti-magnetic coatings were largely pointless (ie given that the magnetic mine threat was very small compared to other hazards), but that textured coatings even without any ballistic properties contributed significantly to the base camouflage properties of a vehicle.

p.s. wasn't the straw + mud thing actually first tried in WW1 on MkV tanks? (Albeit it must have been a challenge to disguise one of those on the battlefield!).
 
I think it must have been obvious even early in the war that anti-magnetic coatings were largely pointless (ie given that the magnetic mine threat was very small compared to other hazards), but that textured coatings even without any ballistic properties contributed significantly to the base camouflage properties of a vehicle.

p.s. wasn't the straw + mud thing actually first tried in WW1 on MkV tanks? (Albeit it must have been a challenge to disguise one of those on the battlefield!).
Germany seemed to have a policy of developing the next generation of weapons to defeat what it had now. As it was using magnetic mines, it was of course logical to develop a counter as the Allies would be bound to follow. Look at the steadily increasing guns and armour of tanks.

Where it all went wrong was when the allies decided to do their own thing. Eg, Zimmerite would have been no use agaisnt ST Grenades.
 

CaptainCowpat

Old-Salt
Crikey 80 man hours and 279kg of extra weight in a 'chopped straw' composition...

You could see the black and yellow camo combination with the straw paste works great but that's a hell of a lot of extra time and weight
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Crikey 80 man hours and 279kg of extra weight in a 'chopped straw' composition...

You could see the black and yellow camo combination with the straw paste works great but that's a hell of a lot of extra time and weight
I seem to recall reading here that the Americans took to pasting 6" of concrete on the front of their Shermans. Patton found out the damage to final drives and other major assemblies and ordered it to stop.
 

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