Reference Image All Tracked Personnel Carriers & Universal Carrier Pictures here please

smeg-head

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#1
We have recently had a thread asking for information about the ubiquitous Universal Carrier. This prompted me to do some research and glean a little of T'interweb's magical knowledge. So, if like me, you are a tracked vehicle junkie without the need for large bangy things, then please feel free to add any pictures, comments or captions. I'll start the ball rolling with a selection from the web...
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smeg-head

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#2
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smeg-head

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#3
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52 Burford Kegresse MG Carrier_kindlephoto-311698.jpg
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#5
Universal Carriers of 2nd Recce Regiment (2nd Division) in Burma, demonstrating that you can fit rather more men into a Carrier than the 'standard' load...


A Universal Carrier, again of 2nd Recce Regiment, locally converted into a self-propelled 3-inch mortar:


An 'amphibious' Universal Carrier belonging to 1st Bn, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 5 Bde, 2 Div, Burma:


And for giggles, a Type 98 So-Da Carrier captured by the 6th Rajputana Rifles:
 

exspy

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#6
All that work developing artillery tractors and yet not one served during the second unpleasantness. Carrier development seemed to have paid off, though.

Cheers,
Dan.
 
#7
I think some Dragon tractors were used in the first year of the war or so? The Belgians and Dutch used the Vickers Utility Tractor.
 
#8
Pneumatic tyre development tipped the balance in favour of wheeled artillery tractors. Some Medium Dragons may have been lost in France. Given that the BEF was still re-equipping, it is possible
 

smeg-head

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#11
View attachment 329996

I'm trying to work out in what way this was armoured. They'd be less exposed in an MG
Certainly an exposed crew configuration. However, the hull of said vehicle was armoured to prevent (alleged) damage by mines or sharp, pointy, sticky-up things.
 
#12
Certainly an exposed crew configuration. However, the hull of said vehicle was armoured to prevent (alleged) damage by mines or sharp, pointy, sticky-up things.
Sufficiently armoured to protect the components that would be time-consuming to replace. How times change.
 
#13
It seems to show that (in regard to MT) Britain had the technological preparedness for WW2 though I'm guessing that numbers might be a bit lacking.
How many of these vehicles were taken into general service? Or are we looking at prototypes that manufacturers were hoping to keep them going in the lean inter-war years?
 

smeg-head

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#14
Sufficiently armoured to protect the components that would be time-consuming to replace. How times change.
Certainly makes you think! Materiel was deemed of more importance than men. It wasn't just the British that were of that mentality though. Take a glance at the Polish C2P or the larger C7P. Neither had much in the way of armour from the waist up.
 

smeg-head

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#15
Further to the above,
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C2P Artillery Tractor

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C7P(R) Recovery Vehicle

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C7P Artillery Tractor.

The main difference between the Recovery Vehicle and the Artillery Tractor was the Wrecker had two less crew seats, but an assortment of tow-bars, gantries and associated equipment; Where the tractor had seating for a complete gun crew (8).
 
#16
To be fair, I do not think anyone was planning for the artillery tractors to be exposed deliberately to direct fire, unlike some of the early personnel / machine-gun carriers such as the Scout and Bren. At best, a bit of frontal protection for the driver/gunner, a la the Komsomolets or Renault UE.
 
#17
It seems to show that (in regard to MT) Britain had the technological preparedness for WW2 though I'm guessing that numbers might be a bit lacking.
How many of these vehicles were taken into general service? Or are we looking at prototypes that manufacturers were hoping to keep them going in the lean inter-war years?
When the BEF went to France in 39 they were almost entirely motorised in contrast to their german opponents who came across the frontier 9 months later with far more horses than the legendary blitzkrieg lark actually implies.
 
#18
Interesting thread about vehicles that all to often are forgotten about.

Whilst doing a search I came across this beauty.
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Seems a bit of a "fun" vehicle built by someone with lots of spare time until you consider this next was a genuine vehicle with the Italians.
I give you (& you can keep it) the Moto Guzzi Mule.
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#19
I am suspicious of that designation. That looks rather like the Vickers D-50. When commenting on the carrier thread I saw the same image and caption, and was suspicious then. As I'll show in a moment, a lot of websites subscribe to the 'make shit up as I go along' model of historical research.

All that work developing artillery tractors and yet not one served during the second unpleasantness.
I know of at least two Dragon carriers (albeit modified) that exchanged fire with enemies of the King, in a meaningful manner. They had a small, but useful role to play in defeating the first of the Axis nations defeated during the war.

At RAF Habbaniya in Iraq they had two modified early Mark Dragons. They had a Rolls Royce armoured car body added to them, and were used to guard the airfield and hold off the Iraqi forces when they attacked. This in turn threw a spanner in the works of the German invasion and allowed the British army and RAF to get reinforcements down there to batter the Iraqi's senseless and take over.

They were named HMAT (His Majesties Armoured Tank) Walrus and Seal. Although one of them seems to have gone through several modifications:



The second one is I believe Seal, although she appears slightly different a few years earlier:


And here's what I mean about people making shit up as they go along. The Russian commentator whose's splashed his text all over the image, has called these prototype Vickers Medium's, which is bollocks.

More amusingly Walrus went by a bit of a different name earlier:


It seems to show that (in regard to MT) Britain had the technological preparedness for WW2 though I'm guessing that numbers might be a bit lacking.
The British army was fully mechanised, as was the French one, unlike certain sausage scoffing invaders who still had a rather large menagerie of giddy-ups.

And my contribution to the last thread:

1944 era Carrier, Tracked, 24. A Rolls Royce designed attempt at a close support carrier. Although this seems limited to slapping a few extra mm's of armour on it and praying. THe project seems to have died a death after it got used for resistance trails.
 

smeg-head

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#20
I am suspicious of that designation. That looks rather like the Vickers D-50. When commenting on the carrier thread I saw the same image and caption, and was suspicious then. As I'll show in a moment, a lot of websites subscribe to the 'make shit up as I go along' model of historical research.



I know of at least two Dragon carriers (albeit modified) that exchanged fire with enemies of the King, in a meaningful manner. They had a small, but useful role to play in defeating the first of the Axis nations defeated during the war.

At RAF Habbaniya in Iraq they had two modified early Mark Dragons. They had a Rolls Royce armoured car body added to them, and were used to guard the airfield and hold off the Iraqi forces when they attacked. This in turn threw a spanner in the works of the German invasion and allowed the British army and RAF to get reinforcements down there to batter the Iraqi's senseless and take over.

They were named HMAT (His Majesties Armoured Tank) Walrus and Seal. Although one of them seems to have gone through several modifications:



The second one is I believe Seal, although she appears slightly different a few years earlier:


And here's what I mean about people making shit up as they go along. The Russian commentator whose's splashed his text all over the image, has called these prototype Vickers Medium's, which is bollocks.

More amusingly Walrus went by a bit of a different name earlier:




The British army was fully mechanised, as was the French one, unlike certain sausage scoffing invaders who still had a rather large menagerie of giddy-ups.

And my contribution to the last thread:

1944 era Carrier, Tracked, 24. A Rolls Royce designed attempt at a close support carrier. Although this seems limited to slapping a few extra mm's of armour on it and praying. THe project seems to have died a death after it got used for resistance trails.
Excellent reply. If any information I have posted is inaccurate, I would blame the various sites for their over enthusiastic use of prefabricated information (bullshit). I do try to keep my references as accurate as possible, but it doesn't help when information has been added to the mincing machine of fact versus fiction.
 

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