All things Ox & Bucks, KRRC, RB, GJ and RGJ

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Further to the above; I also seem to recall that in 3rd Bn we only had rank badge on right arm. The legend behind this ( and it may be just that, a legend) was that when firing the weapon the enemy could not identify the ranks of the shooters.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
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Reviews Editor
Spent 67-70 at Lucknow. Memories of the Tidworth Bowl....worst thing was that Sennybridgewas still within training range.
Horrible bloody place. all mentioned, I mean.
 

Pob02

LE
Book Reviewer
Further to the above; I also seem to recall that in 3rd Bn we only had rank badge on right arm. The legend behind this ( and it may be just that, a legend) was that when firing the weapon the enemy could not identify the ranks of the shooters.
Something carried on today into The Rifles.
 
Lcpl Mike Smith was a potential Officer in 13 Platoon at the depot in early 1974, there were two PO's him and another chap whose name was instantly forgotten, The two were like chalk and cheese, eg on the back of the truck heading to the ranges one would sit at the back trying to do the telegraph crossword and one would mix in with the rest of the Platoon, I later served with him when he was RSO in Hong Kong, I remember he had a very unusual nickname!
He was a platoon commander in A Company when I knew him. There was a story that his father was a dustman but I don’t know if that was true.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
We had a Lt Smith in A coy too, 3rd Bn in about '69. In a battalion filled with double barrelled and sometimes triple barrelled names, oft preceded by 'The Hon' or Lord, or Baron. This guy, a great bloke, I asked him what his background was, in a general conversation , he said his family were newsagents. It took about 5 minutes for the penny to drop. Smith and newsagents?
 
Horrible bloody place. all mentioned, I mean.
Lot of memories of the place; left there for Cyprus UN Tour 67-8, NI inaugural tour 69, Yanks stayed with us before going on to Vietnam - breakfasts were something else for a while; one of my mates shot the duty bugler with an air rifle :sad: then got charged with "Conduct contrary to Section 69 of the Army Act 1955 in that he illegally threw a ten pound tin of army issue custard over a REME Sgt. A friend of mine (an RP not all that popular, but a friend) died when his chute didn't open over Neteravon; and I faced my first charge at the age of 21 when I got docked a weeks wages and then won a months worth at a card school in Tidworth.

Difficult to give it a bad press, left a bit of myself there.
 
I've been obsessively watching this video for the past several months, looking to find what I can about the uniform differences between the three Green Jackets regiments. Several questions have come up, which I hope you guys can answer. Bearing in mind the video is about the introduction of the new No. 2 service dress uniform, with some No. 1's and combat dress footage.

First question: I can see that the Corporals doing the drill have different coloured rank stripes. I'm assuming that black stripes on a red background are for the 60th rifles / KRRC; that black stripes on a dark green background are for the RB, and the lighter green stripes (right shoulder only) are for the Oxf&Bucks. Correct?

Second: Which regiments' officers wore lanyards, what colour and on which shoulder?

Third: I can tell an Oxf&Bucks in No. 1's by the button and single row of piping on the collar, white trim on the epaulette and, in the case of the officer, the use of two shoulder straps with the Sam Browne belt. The KRRC has red trim on the collar. The RB would be essentially an all Rifle Green No.1 uniform. Correct?

Thanks for the help. Two things I find strange with the drill: Parading with the rifle slings loose and and the carrying handle extended, and standing at ease at shoulder arms. And what's with moving the rifle to the straight vertical while marching then pulling it back when not?

Glad all that was gone by the time I started.


Please don't slag off Light infantry drill which was based on being far more pratical than heavy bolloxs - carrying handle out for carrying the wpn at the trail ( ready to use) which is the usual way of marching with the rifle rather than at the shoulder , which is only usually done if marching at the trail is impratical due to the distance of the object in front of you.

All LI Drill, with few exceptions, ends with standing at ease , with the rifle in the shoulder arms posn , so as to not fatigue the bods and is part of the Greenjacket ethos about the care of the men and the 'Thinking Rifleman' alongside 'Move to the left, quick march, etc which gets a squad of men from the at ease posn and on their way with the minimum of fuss and bolloxs instead of the 'squad, squad shun - squad shoulder arms - squad left turn - squad quick march' Robotic shite which is just sooooo dull ;-)
 
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We had a Lt Smith in A coy too, 3rd Bn in about '69. In a battalion filled with double barrelled and sometimes triple barrelled names, oft preceded by 'The Hon' or Lord, or Baron. This guy, a great bloke, I asked him what his background was, in a general conversation , he said his family were newsagents. It took about 5 minutes for the penny to drop. Smith and newsagents?

Which is nice ;-) as we also had one of their nehews/family with us as a lance jack in 2 RGJ who later joined BSAP
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
Which is nice ;-) as we also had one of their nehews/family with us as a lance jack in 2 RGJ who later joined BSAP
There seems to have been something of a draw to Rhodesia at that time. Were they recruiting directly here? You might remember a young officer in 2 RGJ called Anthony Husher, who also struck out to Rhodesia in the late 1970s. He's ended up returning to Africa in his retirement.
 
There seems to have been something of a draw to Rhodesia at that time. Were they recruiting directly here? You might remember a young officer in 2 RGJ called Anthony Husher, who also struck out to Rhodesia in the late 1970s. He's ended up returning to Africa in his retirement.
We did have a few Rhodies sniffing about the local bars trying to get some of us to get over there - They were usually told to do one by the SIB and CSM's , once their presence was known, but a few , bored with BAOR and yet another NI Tour gave it a go, plus we did have a few ex RLI, Canucks, Kiwis and even Aussies throughout the late 70's and early 80's, in 2RGJ.

B Smith joined us about '75 ish and maybe left about 83?

Can't say that I can recall a Mr Husher TBH
 
Rifle slings; we never slung our rifles and as far as I can recall, I never fixed a sling to the rifle.

As for standing at ease at the shoulder, we didn't ever 'order' arms, whereby the butt was placed on the ground. Held at vertical when marching or at attention (we had no word of command for attention) and as you said, at ease the rifle butt was pulled back slightly and free hand went behind the back of our body.
This is great detail. thanks. "Never placed the butt on the ground." Never heard that before. I also didn't notice the other arm behind the back while at ease, either. Now I have to watch it again.

No word for 'Attention?' In the Queen's Own Rifles, the word 'Rifles' is used to bring the squad, platoon or whatever, to attention. I just thought that this was a universal Rifle thing.

Cheers,
Dan.
 
Further to the above; I also seem to recall that in 3rd Bn we only had rank badge on right arm. The legend behind this ( and it may be just that, a legend) was that when firing the weapon the enemy could not identify the ranks of the shooters.
Think it was common practice across the Regiment.
 
Please don't slag off Light infantry drill which was based on being far more practical than heavy bolloxs - carrying handle out for carrying the wpn at the trail (ready to use) which is the usual way of marching with the rifle rather than at the shoulder, which is only usually done if marching at the trail is impractical due to the distance of the object in front of you.

All LI Drill, with few exceptions, ends with standing at ease , with the rifle in the shoulder arms posn , so as to not fatigue the bods and is part of the Greenjacket ethos about the care of the men and the 'Thinking Rifleman' alongside 'Move to the left, quick march, etc which gets a squad of men from the at ease posn and on their way with the minimum of fuss and bolloxs instead of the 'squad, squad shun - squad shoulder arms - squad left turn - squad quick march' Robotic shite which is just sooooo dull ;-)
Yourself and OF&H have provided the best explanation of LI / Rifle drill I've ever had the privilege to read. The video shows, from starting at the 'At Ease' position, moving to a flank and marching on one word or command. Similarly halting, turning to the advance and standing at ease, again on one word of command. As you say, very practical really. One wonders why the Army embraced Guards drill over the LI / Rifle version.

Thanks,
Dan.
 
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This is great detail. thanks. "Never placed the butt on the ground." Never heard that before. I also didn't notice the other arm behind the back while at ease, either. Now I have to watch it again.

No word for 'Attention?' In the Queen's Own Rifles, the word 'Rifles' is used to bring the squad, platoon or whatever, to attention. I just thought that this was a universal Rifle thing.

Cheers,
Dan.
Practice in The Rifles is to bring the unit in consideration to attention by calling their name:
Prowords: Stand Ready... <followed by eg.> Three Platoon / Two Section / F Company...
 
This is the best explanation of LI / Rifle drill I've ever had the privilege to read. The video shows, from starting at the 'At Ease' position, moving to a flank and marching on one word or command. Similarly halting, turning to the advance and standing at ease, again on one word of command. As you say, very practical really. One wonders why the Army embraced Guards drill over the LI / Rifle version.

Thanks,
Dan.
One command, six movements:

Squad will move to the right, quick march:

1. Squad comes to attention
2. Squad turns to the right
3. Squad steps off (rifle still held by the butt, vertical)
4. Left hand slaps and grabs forestock
5. Right hand moves to position between magazine housing and pistol grip
6. Rifle moved to the trail position / left hand snapped back to left side, resumes swinging, usually in step...

Order may be slightly changed, its been a few years since I did drill like this.

Very efficient use of time.
 
Yourself and OF&H have provided the best explanation of LI / Rifle drill I've ever had the privilege to read. The video shows, from starting at the 'At Ease' position, moving to a flank and marching on one word or command. Similarly halting, turning to the advance and standing at ease, again on one word of command. As you say, very practical really. One wonders why the Army embraced Guards drill over the LI / Rifle version.

Thanks,
Dan.

Thanks.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
One command, six movements:

Squad will move to the right, quick march:

1. Squad comes to attention
2. Squad turns to the right
3. Squad steps off (rifle still held by the butt, vertical)
4. Left hand slaps and grabs forestock
5. Right hand moves to position between magazine housing and pistol grip
6. Rifle moved to the trail position / left hand snapped back to left side, resumes swinging, usually in step...

Order may be slightly changed, its been a few years since I did drill like this.

Very efficient use of time.
Or indeed, “Bugle Major ... sound the advance!”
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Yourself and OF&H have provided the best explanation of LI / Rifle drill I've ever had the privilege to read. The video shows, from starting at the 'At Ease' position, moving to a flank and marching on one word or command. Similarly halting, turning to the advance and standing at ease, again on one word of command. As you say, very practical really. One wonders why the Army embraced Guards drill over the LI / Rifle version.

Thanks,
Dan.
We used to do a full passing out parade at the Rifle Depot ( Peninsular Barracks) which was about 29 minutes of drill. All from one word of command. Well, strictly speaking, one phrase, after the immortal words 'Get on parade!)
 

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