All things Ox & Bucks, KRRC, RB, GJ and RGJ

exspy

LE
From other posts, it may be said that I am a bit of a connoisseur of Rifle regiment and Light Infantry trivia, particularly as it relates to the post-Second World War era. One of the more interesting things I picked up at military show over here is a pamphlet printed for the KRRC's bicentenary, held at Winchester on July 25, 1955. From it I have extracted several pieces of trivia about them, which the average reader may not be aware. To the many former Riflemen who frequent these pages, I would imagine most of this is already known.

From this post, I hope others will expand with stories, information and facts that are known or unknown about the Regiment. If this works, other threads about the other regiments could be started. I'll start with information from the pamphlet. All the information is as of 1955.

1) The last four Colonels-in-Chief have been members of the Royal Family. Starting in 1869, it's an unbroken lineage of 86 years.

2) Five members of the Royal Family served in the Regiment between 1899 and 1921, two losing their lives on active service.

3) The Regiment was expanded to four battalions in 1856. It was not until the post-Great War reduction in the Army that it was reduced to two battalions. (This expansion and reduction also applies to the Rifle Brigade.)

4) Each battalion has its own Colonel Commandant, besides the Regiment's Colonel-in-Chief.

5) The Regiment was raised in America in 1755, composed of both American born British subjects and foreign nationals. Foreigners could be commissioned if they were Protestant, but could not be promoted past the rank of Lt-Col. It was a regiment of the line and wore red coats.

6) In 1798, a 5th battalion was organized in England. Armed with rifles and wearing green jackets, it was the British Army's first rifle battalion.

7) The Regiment, like the Rifle Brigade, was not given a county affiliation in 1881 (recruiting from the multi-county London area and the nation as a whole).

8 ) The Regiment's cadet battalion is the only cadet corps to wear a battle honour: SOUTH AFRICA.

9) After the reduction of the British infantry to one battalion per regiment of the line in 1948, a second battalion was formed in 1951 to serve as the motor battalion for the 6th Armoured Division. It was composed of both Regiment and Rifle Brigade soldiers.

In 1960, an additional pamphlet page was produced to bring the first pamphlet up to date.

1) In 1956, a reorganization of the Army saw the end of the need for motor battalions in armoured divisions. Both the Regiment and the Rifle Brigade were reorganized as regular infantry. The two regiments had been motor infantry since 1938.

2) The second battalion was disbanded in 1957.

3) After the Second World War started, but before America entered, 17 US citizens were granted commissions into the Regiment. Four were killed and five seriously wounded.

4) Upon adoption of the Green Jackets Brigade cap badge by all ranks, the officers gave up wearing the red cord boss and silver bugle badge.

That's all I have from the pamphlet. I'm sure former serving members can fill in lot more.

Cheers,
Dan.
 
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old_fat_and_hairy

LE
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Auld-Yin

ADC
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From other posts, it may be said that I am a bit of a connoisseur of Rifle regiment and Light Infantry trivia, particularly as it relates to the post-Second World War era. One of the more interesting things I picked up at military show over here is a pamphlet printed for the KRRC's bicentenary, held at Winchester on July 25, 1955. From it I have extracted several pieces of trivia about them, which the average reader may not be aware. To the many former Riflemen who frequent these pages, I would imagine most of this is already known.

From this post, I hope others will expand with stories, information and facts that are known or unknown about the Regiment. If this works, other threads about the other regiments could be started. I'll start with information from the pamphlet. All the information is as of 1955.

1) The last four Colonels-in-Chief have been members of the Royal Family. Starting in 1869, it's an unbroken lineage of 86 years.

2) Five members of the Royal Family served in the Regiment between 1899 and 1921, two losing their lives on active service.

3) The Regiment was expanded to four battalions in 1856. It was not until the post-Great War reduction in the Army that it was reduced to two battalions. (This expansion and reduction also applies to the Rifle Brigade.)

4) Each battalion has its own Colonel Commandant, besides the Regiment's Colonel-in-Chief.

5) The Regiment was raised in America in 1755, composed of both American born British subjects and foreign nationals. Foreigners could be commissioned if they were Protestant, but could not be promoted past the rank of Lt-Col. It was a regiment of the line and wore red coats.

6) In 1798, a 5th battalion was organized in England. Armed with rifles and wearing green jackets, it was the British Army's first rifle battalion.

7) The Regiment, like the Rifle Brigade, was not given a county affiliation in 1881 (recruiting from the multi-county London area and the nation as a whole).

8 ) The Regiment's cadet battalion is the only cadet corps to wear a battle honour: SOUTH AFRICA.

9) After the reduction of the British infantry to one battalion per regiment of the line in 1948, a second battalion was formed in 1951 to serve as the motor battalion for the 6th Armoured Division. It was composed of both Regiment and Rifle Brigade soldiers.

In 1960, an additional pamphlet page was produced to bring the first pamphlet up to date.

1) In 1956, a reorganization of the Army saw the end of the need for motor battalions in armoured divisions. Both the Regiment and the Rifle Brigade were reorganized as regular infantry. The two regiments had been motor infantry since 1938.

2) The second battalion was disbanded in 1957.

3) After the Second World War started, but before America entered, 17 US citizens were granted commissions into the Regiment. Four were killed and five seriously wounded.

4) Upon adoption of the Green Jackets Brigade cap badge by all ranks, the officers gave up wearing the red cord boss and silver bugle badge.

That's all I have from the pamphlet. I'm sure former serving members can fill in lot more.

Cheers,
Dan.
Bicentenary! Nigs!! 22 years after our tri-centenary!

:cool:
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Not carrying handbags I’d imagine ;-)
I was 1st Bn (Ox & Bucks LI derived) and went to what had been the 3rd Bn (RB) after Options for Change.
From farmer to cowboy@ At least it was rural.
Bicentenary! Nigs!! 22 years after our tri-centenary!

:cool:
From farmer to cowboy! And not a handbag in sight.
 

exspy

LE
So are there no Arrsers actually from 60th Rifles?

Apparently not, but it has been a while since they existed under that name. I've renamed the thread to better reflect everyone's experiences. (Keeping in character with the modern concept of inclusiveness.)

All stories, experiences, dits, jokes, facts (true or not) are welcome. Maybe even the odd LI story or two.

Cheers,
Dan.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I'm fairly sure there is at least one from the 60th, although it was probably 2RGJ when he was in. Hell, I'm bloody ancient and only just made the RB by a year or so.

RGJ were never known for their perfect dress or immaculate appearance, but it was the sainted Sir John Moore who said that " a Rifleman should be as creased and crumpled as the leaf he lies next to" and certainly my battalion took that to heart.:-D
 
Whilst not a Rfn by capbadge I can claim a family interest in the London Regiment (the old-stylee one, not the strange conglomerate it morphed into where it now appears to be masquerading as the the 'not the AR component' of the Foot Guards!!) and also 60 Rifles/2 RGJ as was.

The whole Rifles/LI thing has always interested me since I were a young 'un who used to visit the Somerset Light Infantry Museum in Taunton.

Good thread!!

ETA: I was attached to 2 RGJ (the post Options one) in Belfast for six months and a lot of their way of working rubbed off on me. It didn't go down too well with my hierarchy when I went back to Regimental Duties with my Corps. The ability to think for myself and question things marked me out!

Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
 
Not carrying handbags I’d imagine ;-)
I was 1st Bn (Ox & Bucks LI derived) and went to what had been the 3rd Bn (RB) after Options for Change.
The only handbag I've ever carried was a yellow one! [emoji4]

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8 ) The Regiment's cadet battalion is the only cadet corps to wear a battle honour: SOUTH AFRICA.

Awarded because the Cadet Battalion almost to a man*, volunteered to serve in the war and many did.

* Upper age limit for cadet battalions was 19 in those days.
 
Apparently not, but it has been a while since they existed under that name. I've renamed the thread to better reflect everyone's experiences. (Keeping in character with the modern concept of inclusiveness.)

All stories, experiences, dits, jokes, facts (true or not) are welcome. Maybe even the odd LI story or two.

Cheers,
Dan.
Cameronians didn’t make the cut? The Scottish Rifles afterall.....
 
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Camronians didn’t make the cut? The Scottish Rifles afterall.....
I've often wondered in my idle moments why there was no Welsh rifle regiment. Though to be fair, there was the old 43 (Monmouthshire) LI which were paired with 52 LI and became 1 Ox and Bucks LI and then into 1 RGJ. Perhaps I've just answered my own question? [emoji4]

Maybe we could develop our own infantry capbadge heritage version of Mornington Crescent?

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exspy

LE
Cameronians didn’t make the cut? The Scottish Rifles afterall.....

You're quite right, but if we let in the Scottish, wouldn't the Irish be next?

All kidding aside, I'm guilty of only including the English regiments. Scottish, Irish and Gurkha rifles welcome. No Belgians of course.

I was quite taken watching parades of the Cameronians on youtube. Any piper who can play and march at 140 ppm deserves the extra pay. Pipers and buglers are paid extra, right?

Cheers,
Dan.
 

exspy

LE
I've often wondered in my idle moments why there was no Welsh rifle regiment. Though to be fair, there was the old 43 (Monmouthshire) LI which were paired with 52 LI and became 1 Ox and Bucks LI and then into 1 RGJ.

Isn't Monmouthshire in England? Wasn't that where the SWB recruited from?

Cheers,
Dan.
 
Isn't Monmouthshire in England? Wasn't that where the SWB recruited from?

Cheers,
Dan.
Allow me:

Monmouthshire - Wikipedia.

True regarding the SWB but they also recruited in Brecknockshire and Herefordshire as well: their Depot was in Brecon - now HQ 160 (Wales) Bde.

ETA: the SWB were created at the same time as the 43rd LI affiliated to Oxfordshire so perhaps they simply took over their recruiting patch?

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You're quite right, but if we let in the Scottish, wouldn't the Irish be next?

All kidding aside, I'm guilty of only including the English regiments. Scottish, Irish and Gurkha rifles welcome. No Belgians of course.

I was quite taken watching parades of the Cameronians on youtube. Any piper who can play and march at 140 ppm deserves the extra pay. Pipers and buglers are paid extra, right?

Cheers,
Dan.
Try drumming at that speed.......I had a Cameronian instructor in my early days, he was a soldier who was switched on and intense who never suffered fools, not exactly a people person either. He taught us the Cameronian way even though it was a style of the past no longer required, but his whole belief was about being truly musical from the slow airs to marching at Mach 1.
 
Wotcher @exspy. Good call.

Normally get a notification i someone uses the @ summoning spell but that didn't happen this time.

Bit busy right now so I'll dig some more stuff out for you shortly, but since this is the first page — and since there may be some journo types schnurgling around — perhaps we should start by establishing the fact that Pegasus Bridge was captured by an Oxfordshire a coup de main force under command of Major John Howard consisting of D Coy 2 OBLI, reinforced by two platoons from B Coy ... because they always seem to get forgotten. =D

More to follow.
Edited to remove an edit...
 
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