All medical chat and queries in here. Please don't start a new one for every single medical question.

You’ll be doing block jobs and ironing creases in PT shorts before you know it.


If you develop an infection it’s no real drama for you, you’ll usually be treated with a course of antibiotics.
 
Hello, I recently applied to join the British Army, after going through my interview, chasing up my application every few days, I have been permantly deferred and need to appeal because of I have a 'history of dermatitis in the hands'. Some years ago the skin started peeling on my hands and this is the only time it has happened, I don't why. I went to pharmacies and walk in centres, no one what I was and in the end, I went to my doctor and even he didn't know what it was but put me on a dermititis cream to try and get rid of it, eventually it worked and never came back, I just want to know what should I put in my appeal, do you think it will work, anyone had any similar cases?
 
Hello, I recently applied to join the British Army, after going through my interview, chasing up my application every few days, I have been permantly deferred and need to appeal because of I have a 'history of dermatitis in the hands'. Some years ago the skin started peeling on my hands and this is the only time it has happened, I don't why. I went to pharmacies and walk in centres, no one what I was and in the end, I went to my doctor and even he didn't know what it was but put me on a dermititis cream to try and get rid of it, eventually it worked and never came back, I just want to know what should I put in my appeal, do you think it will work, anyone had any similar cases?
To appeal, you need to provide relevant qualified medical evidence.
A detailed letter from your GP indicating that there has been no further incidents, treatment and no likelihood of reoccurrence.

Remember- Contact dermatitis is a type of eczema triggered by contact with a particular substance.

If the substance that caused your flair up could not be identified it could be a tad concerning. Then again it may of been something as simple as a cheap soap, heavily chlorinated water or even a plant you had a reaction to.

These flair ups if you are prone to them can be made worse by oils, heat, cold & friction. All things that your hands will experience in training & beyond.

Three years free of treatment or reoccurrence and a good appeal and you shouldn’t have any drama.
 
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To appeal, you need to provide relevant qualified medical evidence.
A detailed letter from your GP indicating that there has been no further incidents, treatment and no likelihood of reoccurrence.

Remember- Contact dermatitis is a type of eczema triggered by contact with a particular substance.

If the substance that caused your flair up could not be identified it could be a tad concerning. Then again it may of been something as simple as a cheap soap, heavily chlorinated water or even a plant you had a reaction to.

These flair ups if you are prone to them can be made worse by oils, heat, cold & friction. All things that your hands will experience in training & beyond.

Three years free of treatment or reoccurrence and a good appeal and you shouldn’t have any drama.
What would you consider a good appeal? Would you suggest seeing a specialist if I can?
 
What would you consider a good appeal? Would you suggest seeing a specialist if I can?
you need proof that you haven't required treatment in the past three years. A specialist isn't going to be able to provide that
 
Just someone said something about seeing a specialist to test my skin is all. So would a letter from my gp stating that I've not been in again since it happened, be seen as sufficient evidence?
that'll do for now. If they still reject you then it's time to look at a specialist to prove what you do, or don't have.
 
Aye he’s right.

Your GP will suffice for evidence.

In my experience it’s always better to go for a big hit with an appeal as opposed to drip feeding. So in essence the more evidence to support you can get the better. GP should be able to provide dates, diagnosis, treatment & recovery. Always stack the deck.

Speak to @Muso94 or @Asayyadina

Both smart cookies who have recently submitted an appeal. They may be able to assist you with how to structure.
 
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Aye he’s right.

Your GP will suffice for evidence.

In my experience it’s always better to go for a big hit with an appeal as opposed to drip feeding. So in essence the more evidence to support you can get the better. GP should be able to provide dates, diagnosis, treatment & recovery. Always stack the deck.

Speak to @Muso94 or @Asayyadina

Both smart cookies who have recently submitted an appeal. They may be able to assist you with how to structure.
@Ryan12345 as above, submitted my appeal a few weeks ago and while I have not had a decision yet I am more than happy to discuss how I went about it. Plus I am a teacher so I am a proof-reading demon if you want your letter looked over.
 
@Ryan12345 as above, submitted my appeal a few weeks ago and while I have not had a decision yet I am more than happy to discuss how I went about it. Plus I am a teacher so I am a proof-reading demon if you want your letter looked
Thank you so much! This means an awful lot to me and need the best appeal possible, I really have no idea where to start, what should I say to my gp, I have a information request form that I will be taking to him some time within the week
 
Aye he’s right.

Your GP will suffice for evidence.

In my experience it’s always better to go for a big hit with an appeal as opposed to drip feeding. So in essence the more evidence to support you can get the better. GP should be able to provide dates, diagnosis, treatment & recovery. Always stack the deck.

Speak to @Muso94 or @Asayyadina

Both smart cookies who have recently submitted an appeal. They may be able to assist you with how to structure.
@Ryan12345 I will PM you now
 
@Ryan12345 as above, submitted my appeal a few weeks ago and while I have not had a decision yet I am more than happy to discuss how I went about it. Plus I am a teacher so I am a proof-reading demon if you want your letter looked over.
His reply is embedded in his quote above your reply.

@Ryan12345 definitely an offer you should take up. Don’t take it personal though if @Asayyadina covers your letter in red pen & calls your parents.

Most appeal results take around 4-6 weeks.
 
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Or will I have to provide ao

That's fine by me! As long as I can get the best possible appeal sent off is my only concern! Thank you
The main points to think about , Brevity, relevence and accuracy.

Keep it short, keep it about the matter in hand and don't put guesswork, assumptions etc.
Leave out 'evidence' from old school teachers, that bloke at the gym and some knob off a website (especially this one)
They won't particularly care about the format, just make it fairly easy to read
 
The main points to think about , Brevity, relevence and accuracy.

Keep it short, keep it about the matter in hand and don't put guesswork, assumptions etc.
Leave out 'evidence' from old school teachers, that bloke at the gym and some knob off a website (especially this one)
They won't particularly care about the format, just make it fairly easy to read
Good general common sense advice.

Ryan, Chat with @Asayyadina & @Muso94
as getting good solid, current, advice will always trump second guessing.

I’ll reiterate- when in comes to appealing. The more relevant clinical information you bring to the table the better.

Keep it relevant and let your supporting evidence from qualified professionals do the talking.

Formatting it nice and clean, with clear headings so they don’t have to go digging will make life easier for all.

How many years ago did you receive treatment?

An appeal when deconstructed is nothing more than a review on the grounds of the supporting evidence you have provided.

There are a few older medics that pop up on this thread that are pre common core let alone this dire capita era. As important as advice from old salts is, current advice, especially from peers going through a similar experience will always be gold dust.

Always stack the deck. If it’s clinical & relevant fire it in.

@Muso94 is testament to that.
 
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