All medical chat and queries in here. Please don't start a new one for every single medical question.

DocSavage

Clanker
Appreciate nobody can give me a concrete answer, but from experience is there any hope at all for any of the forces for an ACL reconstruction nearly 10 years ago?
Unfortunately any acl repair no matter when will be considered unfit for service. It is the same for all 3 services, regular and reserve.
 

maped

Crow
From my limited time in recruitment my understanding is that ACL reconstruction surgery is unfortunately a bar to entry. No ifs or buts. That said, only the Medical Examiner is able to give definitive guidance in this area (which @DocSavage is absolutely qualified to do so).

An ACL tear, without surgery is not necessarily a bar in all circumstances. Sorry it’s not the answer you were hoping for.
@DocSavage thank you. I presume medical appeals won’t help? Have had a very active life with no problems.
 
So after having to complete a 12 week fitness diary to prove my back can handle the stress of training( I fractured it nearly 20 years ago) I've sent it away, anyone have an idea for how long a decision will take and if anyone has had a similar situation what the outcome for them was
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
So after having to complete a 12 week fitness diary to prove my back can handle the stress of training( I fractured it nearly 20 years ago) I've sent it away, anyone have an idea for how long a decision will take and if anyone has had a similar situation what the outcome for them was
Potentially months. They have a very substantial backlog. Certainly don’t expect anything this side of Easter.
 

Hollz2412

Swinger
Hey everyone so after passing triage and booking my selection the army received my medical records and have denied me on something that I was told in 2017 if I waited 3 years I’d be fine to join. Anyone heard of this before? Is it worth appealing? Also do all the services follow the same medical guidelines or are they different for each of them? Thanks.
 

Ozzy00

Clanker
Hey everyone so after passing triage and booking my selection the army received my medical records and have denied me on something that I was told in 2017 if I waited 3 years I’d be fine to join. Anyone heard of this before? Is it worth appealing? Also do all the services follow the same medical guidelines or are they different for each of them? Thanks.
Hi mate
DISCLAIMER I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR PART OF THE BRITISH ARMY RECRUITMENT TEAM
I got deferred back in 2016 for ADHD Meds
I just died a little inside
Just remember youll get there eventually :)
 
;D
Hi mate
DISCLAIMER I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR PART OF THE BRITISH ARMY RECRUITMENT TEAM
I got deferred back in 2016 for ADHD Meds

Just remember youll get there eventually :)
I sent it straight to the assessment centre that I went to, not sure if that makes the process slightly faster
 
Ironically it may make it slower.

Appeals are dealt with by Occ Med with Col Occ Med/SO1 Occ Med input. They sit within ARTD, who are the competent authority on pre-employment medical standards and as such is the final level of medical appeal for potential recruits and potential officers.

Or were you instructed to submit via the selection centre SMO? @amnesia or @theoriginalphantom will be better placed to advise.
I believe it was the smo of the selection centre
 

Brit77

Crow
Hey everyone, sending off my appeal for the army soon but I’m wondering if the Royal Marines have the same medical process / standards? Have any of you guys had the experience of going through both the army and royal marine medial stages of the application? Would the Royal Marines be more lenient medical wise in general?



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Email

Clanker
Hey everyone, sending off my appeal for the army soon but I’m wondering if the Royal Marines have the same medical process / standards? Have any of you guys had the experience of going through both the army and royal marine medial stages of the application? Would the Royal Marines be more lenient medical wise in general?



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I have been through Royal Marines medical (Pulled my application after it though) but I have not been through the army medical yet. When I was joining the RM I was told that 60% of people who appeal their medical pass it in the end. I do not know if this is the same as the army but I am guessing it is.
 

amnesia

Old-Salt
So after having to complete a 12 week fitness diary to prove my back can handle the stress of training( I fractured it nearly 20 years ago) I've sent it away, anyone have an idea for how long a decision will take and if anyone has had a similar situation what the outcome for them was
So i
;D

I sent it straight to the assessment centre that I went to, not sure if that makes the process slightly faster
So, it depends which AC issued you the exercise diary, but realistically it shouldnt take more than 2 - 4 weeks.

It isnt an appeal, it is a diary, so just needs the AC MO to actually look at it.

If you have waited more than a fortnight I would get on to your Recruiter at he AFCO, or your CSM (whichever is more on the ball), and they will chase up the med. centre.
 

amnesia

Old-Salt
Hey everyone so after passing triage and booking my selection the army received my medical records and have denied me on something that I was told in 2017 if I waited 3 years I’d be fine to join. Anyone heard of this before? Is it worth appealing? Also do all the services follow the same medical guidelines or are they different for each of them? Thanks.
If the medical standards have changed around this issue then you could be turned down on something that previously you wouldnt have - it does seem unusual though - most medical standards have become a little more relaxed.

Yes, all three services operate to the same set of rules, however they are sometimes interpreted differently. I know of candidates that have failed the Army process, but been passed fit by our Naval colleagues.

This shouldnt happen, and it is a rarity, so dont get your hopes up. The odds are that you will receive the same outcome.
 

amnesia

Old-Salt
I have been through Royal Marines medical (Pulled my application after it though) but I have not been through the army medical yet. When I was joining the RM I was told that 60% of people who appeal their medical pass it in the end. I do not know if this is the same as the army but I am guessing it is.
It isnt.

The RN medicals are first done by Capita, then appeals go to the RN - two seperate organizations, with different rules & goals.

RPP is run differently - its is (now) a true partnership, where military and civilian work side by side in the same teams, with the same terms of reference and the same goals.
 

Brit77

Crow
It isnt.

The RN medicals are first done by Capita, then appeals go to the RN - two seperate organizations, with different rules & goals.

RPP is run differently - its is (now) a true partnership, where military and civilian work side by side in the same teams, with the same terms of reference and the same goals.
So would is this process less strict than the army process?


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amnesia

Old-Salt
So would is this process less strict than the army process?


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Just different.

Capita (RN), err on the side of caution with medical decisions - hence why, when a candidate's appeal goes to the RN decision maker, it has a good chance of being overturned.

I should say this is all anecdotal - I dont work in RN recruiting, but I do work along side them.

This used to be the case within RPP - the Army financially punished Capita, so Capita erred on the side of caution with medical decisions (which is why there was often criticism of the capita med. process in the past.)

Capita and the Army (RPP) now work in a much more grown up fashion, and will often give candidates a "best chance" opportunity, if they have concern about a candidate's medical records.

The overall processes are different too - RPP insist on seeing the full medical records (PHCR) for Regular Soldiers, so a candidate is more likely to be turned down, because RPP have a much fuller picture about an individual's medical history.
 

Email

Clanker
It isnt.

The RN medicals are first done by Capita, then appeals go to the RN - two seperate organizations, with different rules & goals.

RPP is run differently - its is (now) a true partnership, where military and civilian work side by side in the same teams, with the same terms of reference and the same goals.
That makes sense, sorry.
 

S7015642F

Swinger
Hello, could anyone help me find in the jsp 950 where is talks about iron deficiency?

In 2018 I passed out due to my iron levels being low and now have been requested to go to my doctors and get a full blood count.
 

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