All medical chat and queries in here. Please don't start a new one for every single medical question.

How often are first appeals successful or do they normally go to 2nd appeal where it goes to army rather than capita before success? Don’t want to get hopes up too much for first appeal if capita always uphold their own decisions?
 
Thanks, ive got to wait till wednesday to speak to dr to get them to write a letter, but ive used that template to draft my letter. Has anyone had much success with ADHD appeals? i have never been violent so i dont know why its come up, could it just be capita misreading something? I havent been to drs with it since secondary school so 6 years and ive never been on medication for it.
How often are first appeals successful or do they normally go to 2nd appeal where it goes to army rather than capita before success? Don’t want to get hopes up too much for first appeal if capita always uphold their own decisions?
Firstly, it is highly unlikely that a trained medical professional has mis-read your medical records, regardless of who pays them.

Secondly, and to answer your question, second line appeals are less likely to be succesful than first line appeals - if you have aleady been ruled against twice, you would need some seriously compelling new evidence to be succesful.

There is no point appealing a second time without new evidence.

Thirdly, and to re-iterate what somebody else said...if your medical records state you have had violent episodes then it doesnt matter what you, or anybody else feels about it, it is there in black & white! Your main hope is to prove that that information is incorrect.

Good luck.
 
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Firstly, it is highly unlikely that a trained medical professional has mis-read your medical records, regardless of who pays them.

Secondly, and to answer your question, second line appeals are less likely to be succesful than first line appeals - if you have aleady been ruled against twice, you would need some seriously compelling new evidence to be succesful.

There is no point appealing a second time without new evidence.

Thirdly, and to re-iterate what somebody else said...if your medical records state you have had violent episodes then it doesnt matter what you, or anybody else feels about it, it is there in black & white! Your main hope is to prove that that information is incorrect.

Good luck.
Thanks for the advice. I just wondered if capita will uphold their own decision because it’s their own team that’s all. Not disputing the process.
My gp believes the information is incorrect regards violent episodes. I was diagnosed at the age of 7 when struggling with concentration at school nothing else, and haven’t been to drs or had any issues at school since age of 11. Never had medication prescribed for it as was considered mild/manageable. Definitely have to try to appeal as army is all I’ve wanted to do for years.
 
Applying to join the Army Reserves as an officer in either the RMP or Int Corps, but I understand the medical stage of the application is identical for regular and reserve so hopefully it's fine to post here.

Seeing a GP on Thurs to write a letter to support my appeal. Just looking for any general advice. Sorry if this is a bit long - it's partly copied from my email to the GP.

Got refused on med grounds because
of my "history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in 2008 and symptoms in 2012” and that I “did not attend for further investigations and have not had ablation treatment”.

The Army doctor further noted my “history of asthma and bladder outflow obstruction/urethral stricture” as potentially problematic.

I will ask the GP to point out that the 2008 episode of paroxysmal SVT occurred in intensive care following an RTA, and my self-report of an accelerated heartbeat in 2012 occurred during a high-stress exam period (and, as far as I remember, was never determined to be anything unusual). I also note that I have not had any symptoms of asthma or breathing issues for approximately a decade, nor do I have any issues with my urinary system, with the historical issue also resulting from that RTA (my unit got squished against the tank of a Yamaha TZR 125).

I was found “medically unfit” under “Section 4 – Disturbances of rhythm” of MOD policy JSP 950 (also enclosed). This addresses “Candidates with established heart disease”. As far as I know I have not actually been diagnosed as having any heart issue. So I'm wondering if it's just easier to attack that rather than show lots of evidence of good heart health.

Sorry for the long winded post. Any thoughts invited.
 
I had a phone call regarding my appeal about 2 months ago saying that there may be a change in rule within the JSP and that I'm too keep a look out for it.... Is there a rough idea as to when they update the JSP?
Thank you :)
 
Can anyone give me a detailed insight into the assessment centre medical as have mine coming up soon.
Thanks

BMI is taken; height and weight.

Your "blow" is recorded, you are given a tube and you have to blow as hard as you can into said tube 3 times.

Eye tests:
1. Read off letters at a distance covering one eye at a time (standard eye test)
2. Read coloured numbers off coloured backgrounds in a book to test for colour blindness

Hearing test:
1. Go into cubical, put on noise-cancelling headphones, given a "clicker", click whenever you hear a buzz, these range from low to high frequencies, start loud and get quieter in each ear

Heart is checked, lie down on a table, they attach wires to your body and record your heart rate etc.

Doctor check-up:
1. He will ask the usual questions; had any history of illness, broken any bones etc etc
2. Goes through your urine check up ( you get given a little tube to fill up with urine on the first day )
3. Strip off, have to do a few push-ups, a few bendy poses, walk across the room on all parts of your foot, squat walking etc.
4. He puts his doctor scope thing on you and asks you to cough, breath heavy etc to check your lungs.
5. Takes your blood pressure with the squeezy arm thing.

After all that, you get given your green card and you're good to go.

Hope this helps.
 
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Can someone help @Jellybean71 out with this question before s/he chalks up another locked thread, please...?

"Taking my daughter for her medical at Westbury soon was wondering how long the appointment generally lasts. Thanks"
 
Hi all,

I was recently rejected from entry to the reserves due to a small spontaneous pneumothorax I suffered 11 years ago (in 2008) when I was a heavy smoker and led an unhealthy lifestyle. The occurrence of a pneumothorax increases the likelihood or recurrence. When I got the diagnosis I stopped smoking and started leading an increasingly active lifestyle. I'm now a personal trainer and go to the gym daily doing intense physical exercise, and am involved in a number of physically demanding activities outside of the gym (bouldering etc) with no recurrence.

I took a spirometry test during assessment at Lichfield and scored 124% of the average for my height and age.

I appealed the decision, sending in a covering letter detailing this, as well as a letter from my GP stating that there had been no recurrence or symptoms in the years since, and a letter of recommendation from the Staff Sergeant at my local reserves centre stating that I always complete the physical tasks without issue during the training, and that I was willing to take any other test they deemed necessary.

My appeal was rejected because of the potential for recurrence.

I have another two appeals left, which I will certainly take, but I don't hold too much hope for the decision being overturned.

Does anyone have any experience with this situations or any ideas of how best to proceed to maximise my chances?

Thanks in advance.
 
Hi all,

I was recently rejected from entry to the reserves due to a small spontaneous pneumothorax I suffered 11 years ago (in 2008) when I was a heavy smoker and led an unhealthy lifestyle. The occurrence of a pneumothorax increases the likelihood or recurrence. When I got the diagnosis I stopped smoking and started leading an increasingly active lifestyle. I'm now a personal trainer and go to the gym daily doing intense physical exercise, and am involved in a number of physically demanding activities outside of the gym (bouldering etc) with no recurrence.

I took a spirometry test during assessment at Lichfield and scored 124% of the average for my height and age.

I appealed the decision, sending in a covering letter detailing this, as well as a letter from my GP stating that there had been no recurrence or symptoms in the years since, and a letter of recommendation from the Staff Sergeant at my local reserves centre stating that I always complete the physical tasks without issue during the training, and that I was willing to take any other test they deemed necessary.

My appeal was rejected because of the potential for recurrence.

I have another two appeals left, which I will certainly take, but I don't hold too much hope for the decision being overturned.

Does anyone have any experience with this situations or any ideas of how best to proceed to maximise my chances?

Thanks in advance.

Do you meet the entry standards?
What are you appealing against?
 
Do you meet the entry standards?
What are you appealing against?
I do - I passed all the tests throughout assessment but my medical forms hadn't been received by that stage (due to my local GP surgery being useless), so I got a conditional pass, then was rejected when they received them.

If I went to a respiratory specialist, got tested, and sent the results and written testimony from the specialist saying that there's no more chance of recurrence than if I'd never had the pneumothorax in the first place, would this be enough to overturn the decision?
 
I do - I passed all the tests throughout assessment but my medical forms hadn't been received by that stage (due to my local GP surgery being useless), so I got a conditional pass, then was rejected when they received them.

If I went to a respiratory specialist, got tested, and sent the results and written testimony from the specialist saying that there's no more chance of recurrence than if I'd never had the pneumothorax in the first place, would this be enough to overturn the decision?

how were you treated for your spontaneous pheumothorax?
 
how were you treated for your spontaneous pheumothorax?
I wasn't - that was the specific reason for the rejection; the surgery recommended post-pneumothorax was not performed at the time. My GP has contacted the local respiratory team for advice on whether they would recommend this surgery now, or whether too much time has elapsed for it to be appropriate.

Being the NHS, they will take a while to respond, and since it's not an emergency, it will take a few months to get an appointment for assessment by them.

If the operation is still a viable option for me, I'd be happy to agree to it as long as it would definitely overturn the decision and allow me entry.
 
I wasn't - that was the specific reason for the rejection; the surgery recommended post-pneumothorax was not performed at the time. My GP has contacted the local respiratory team for advice on whether they would recommend this surgery now, or whether too much time has elapsed for it to be appropriate.

Being the NHS, they will take a while to respond, and since it's not an emergency, it will take a few months to get an appointment for assessment by them.

If the operation is still a viable option for me, I'd be happy to agree to it as long as it would definitely overturn the decision and allow me entry.
then you don't meet the entry criteria and your appeal is against the ruling (based on medical evidence) and the medical standards for entry.

Good luck with that one
 
then you don't meet the entry criteria and your appeal is against the ruling (based on medical evidence) and the medical standards for entry.

Good luck with that one
How about if I got reassessed by the respiratory specialist and they were willing to write a report based on the results stating that, due to the time elapsed and the lifestyle changes I have made since, I am no more risk of a recurrence than someone who has never had one?
 
How about if I got reassessed by the respiratory specialist and they were willing to write a report based on the results stating that, due to the time elapsed and the lifestyle changes I have made since, I am no more risk of a recurrence than someone who has never had one?
Will that change your past medical history or the medical entry standards?
 
Will that change your past medical history or the medical entry standards?
Well the medical entry standards specify that the reason the operation is required is due to the high risk of recurrence once a pneumothorax has occurred. If I can prove that I'm at no higher a risk than if someone who had never had one, would that not be grounds to overturn the decision?
 
Well the medical entry standards specify that the reason the operation is required is due to the high risk of recurrence once a pneumothorax has occurred. If I can prove that I'm at no higher a risk than if someone who had never had one, would that not be grounds to overturn the decision?
as I understand it, once you've had one there is a 13 - 60% chance of it happening again. In the normal adult population the rates of having one are 14.1 per 100,000 population.
 
as I understand it, once you've had one there is a 13 - 60% chance of it happening again. In the normal adult population the rates of having one are 14.1 per 100,000 population.
There are a lot of contributing factors. Young males are at the highest risk, being many times more likely than females to experience one. Also, smoking vastly increases the chance. I was a young man, who led a sedentary lifestyle and smoked heavily. I haven't smoked for 11 years, and have an extremely active lifestyle.

This is why my question regarding the report from the respiratory specialists is pertinent - if, upon examination, they can categorically state that the chances of recurrence are the same as having never had it, would it be grounds for overturning the decision? If I am at a higher risk still then so be it, I'm just trying to manage my expectations.
 
There are a lot of contributing factors. Young males are at the highest risk, being many times more likely than females to experience one. Also, smoking vastly increases the chance. I was a young man, who led a sedentary lifestyle and smoked heavily. I haven't smoked for 11 years, and have an extremely active lifestyle.

This is why my question regarding the report from the respiratory specialists is pertinent - if, upon examination, they can categorically state that the chances of recurrence are the same as having never had it, would it be grounds for overturning the decision? If I am at a higher risk still then so be it, I'm just trying to manage my expectations.
you appear to be asking the same question until you get the answer you want,


as I said previously, good luck
 

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