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£85 best English pounds.

The bus route from London, England to Kolkata, India is considered the longest bus route in the world. The route was launched in 1957 by Albert Travel and operated until 1976.
The first voyage began in London on April 15, 1957 and ended on June 5 in Kolkata. Thus, the trip took about 50 days. The bus went from England to Belgium, and from there to India via West Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan and West Pakistan. A total of about 32.669 km. The cost of the trip was £ 85. This amount included food, travel and accommodation.
The bus was equipped with reading areas, a kitchen with all the equipment and amenities, separate sleeping places for everyone and heaters with a fan. An observation deck was located on the upper deck of the bus.
Along the way, the bus stopped at several popular tourist destinations, including the city of Varanasi and the Taj Mahal. There were also stops for shopping in Tehran, Salzburg, Kabul, Istanbul and Vienna.

Very interesting. And for reference £85 in todays money is £1,762.28 and I found this which I thought interesting too: the average weekly wage was £7.50 – adding up to annual earnings of £390 – and, at £2,000, the average house price was just under five times this figure. Today houses are twice as expensive.
 
Some of you will doubtless be aware of this website already.

 
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A friend of ours no longer with us flew from Southampton to Cape Town on a flying boat pre war.
It must have cost the earth.

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Not quite as dramatic, but I remember as a kid, the whole family (6 adults & 4 kids) flying to Thailand in the mid-70's (Nan was Thai). It took over 24hrs, not allowed to disembark other than to have a quick leg stretch around the aircraft before/after it fuelled up and IIRC (I'll miss something out for sure...)

Heathrow - Amsterdam - Vienna - Istanbul - Bahrain - Karachi - Bangkok.

Same on the return - I also assume that it carried on going after Bangkok.

Back in those days, Benidorm was relatively unusual so Thailand was a different world - luckily our folks made us fill in daily scrapbook entries as we toured the country by train & boat - Bangkok, Pattaya, Chang Mai, War Cemeteries for the Burma Railway etc... So when we got back to school and they asked us to do a story about our holiday - Boom!

Was a mind blowing trip for an 8 year old - was lucky to be just old enough to enjoy it and remember bits. I learnt more in that one trip than I did in years of school.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer


heres a thought
the worlds first open heart surgery was performed successfully by Major Dwight Harken, at the 160th U.S. General Hospital in Gloucestershire, just along the road from Down Ampney, and Blakehill where over 100,000 injured personnel were returned for treatment
He did the same operation on 133 young men, all of whom survived and recovered



also serving at the same hospital was Major Paul Zoll, who went on to make major contributions to the Pacemaker
all this from some timber sheds set up in the woods

all of this early work set the course for heart Surgery that is now seen as routine !
Sorry just thought i would place that in full view
we may take the mick out of the Americans, but they have a knack of getting things done , while other people talk about it
 
heres a thought
the worlds first open heart surgery was performed successfully by Major Dwight Harken, at the 160th U.S. General Hospital in Gloucestershire, just along the road from Down Ampney, and Blakehill where over 100,000 injured personnel were returned for treatment
He did the same operation on 133 young men, all of whom survived and recovered



also serving at the same hospital was Major Paul Zoll, who went on to make major contributions to the Pacemaker
all this from some timber sheds set up in the woods

all of this early work set the course for heart Surgery that is now seen as routine !
Sorry just thought i would place that in full view
we may take the mick out of the Americans, but they have a knack of getting things done , while other people talk about it
Indeed the American medical system helped shape modern ambulance techniques, and led the way for paramedics.
First seen at the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash, the use of triage.
From the local paper.

"On a similar level, the disaster also informed the practice of the NHS and the emergency services at crises. Much of this came down to Lieutenant Sweetwine’s actions on the day.

The medic brought an end to the haste that predominated ambulance practice before the crash, with Sweetwine having stayed at the station to diagnose and mark the survivors on their foreheads with either a ‘X’ or an ‘M’ – designating whether they had already been treated or needed morphine respectively – thereby helping to prevent overdoses.

This process highlighted the need for ambulance drivers to take a more active role at crises, and in so doing influenced the creation of the modern paramedic."
 
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