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I've just emailed my MP to ask why no patriarchal, abusive, privileged, white males appear on that page.

I'll update when /if I get a fobbing off an answer.

Perhaps it's a form of subliminal racism?
Mr. patriarchal, abusive, privileged, etc, has taken the trouble to find out about his future financial security.
Whereas Mr. POC hasn't been arsed and has to be dragged through the process by the nose?
 
I've been an enthusiastic follower of the "Fancy a bit of Ginger thread for quite a while.
https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/fancy-a-bit-of-ginger-nsfw.196079/
Just came across this article.
Gingers need more anaesthetic

So those of us who have the requisite white van with black nasty etc, may need to use more chloroform if your date is a Ginger
I can confirm this as my wife is a redhead.

As she is wife #3 I have come to realise that she needs one or two extra vodkas before she reaches the required temperature.
 
Published by: THINK DEFENCE, on 18 September 2021.

A New Port at Port Stanley.

The existing port facility at Port Stanley on the Falklands, locally known as FIPASS, will soon be replaced.


Work has commenced on a new port facility at Port Stanley that will replace the post-conflict FIPASS.
Probably the most ingenious and revolutionary bit of ship to shore logistics capability that no one has ever heard of, FIPASS was deceptively simple. It was not used until a few years after the conflict but is worth describing here as it sets the scene for recent developments. Soon after the liberation of the Falkland Islands, the construction phase for the airbase at Mount Pleasant and Mare Harbour commenced. This meant a considerable influx of construction personnel, equipment and materials. The existing techniques of offloading using Mexeflote’s and RCL’s, whilst ideal for amphibious operations, simply could not cope with the increasing volumes and the offload facilities at Port Stanley were still woefully inadequate despite some improvement works completed by the Royal Engineers. This had resulted in excess demurrage costs and a large bottleneck as ships were unable to unload in good time . . .

. . . The Government advertised for innovative solutions to the problem and the tender was won by the Middlesbrough company, ITM Offshore, who had considerable experience in offshore construction. Unlike the other proposals, their solution was planned to be operational in 5 months. Based on technology and systems developed for the North Sea oil industry, the Falkland Islands Intermediate Port and Storage System (FIPASS) was designed to resolve a number of issues; port access, refrigerated warehouse space and personnel accommodation.

Six North Sea oil rig support barges (300×90 ft and about 10,000 DWT each) were connected together and linked to the shore via a 600-foot causeway with a final and smaller barge acting as a floating linkspan which was also used as a RORO interface. The facility also made provision for stern on mooring and 300m of conventional berthing. Four of the barges carried warehouses, with provision for refrigerated storage. In addition, there were accommodation offices, which include a galley and messing facility for 200 persons.

A key point is that it was not only a berthing facility but also had significant storage. The linkspan and causeway were designed and installed by MacGregor Navire (now Cargotec), Harland and Wolff the accommodation facilities and Nuttall installed the mooring dolphins. After construction was complete it was transported south on two heavy-lift FLO FLO vessels, the Dyvi Teal and the Dyvi Swan in a phased lift that matched the construction schedule.

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The heavy-lift ships were faster and safer than towing.

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The large ships also carried a crane barge that was used in the construction process.

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Once in the Falkland Islands they were floated off the heavy lift vessels and installed by ITM staff and Royal Engineers who had previously built all the necessary connecting roads, including one to the Mount Pleasant construction site. The first cargo ship to use Flexiport (MV Leicesterbrook) unloaded 500 tonnes of general cargo and 60 ISO containers in 30 hours.

By way of comparison, the same load/offloaded using Mexeflote’s took 21 days. Larger vessels would take up to a month to unload using Mexeflote’s, it was a massive improvement.

Writing about the harbour after FIPASS was up and running, a writer for the Falkland Islands newsletter wrote . . .

"Latest reports from the Falkland Islands are that Port Stanley now looks rather empty".

All this cost £23 million, or about £50 million in today’s money but it saved a small fortune in keeping refrigerated vessels offshore and floating cold stores and speeded unloading up immeasurably, in fact, it paid for itself in less than 2 years due largely to the excess shipping costs being eliminated.

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A couple of years after its initial deployment FIPASS was gifted to the government of the Falkland Islands.

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Since then it has operated continuously and is now managed by ATLink

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As part of continued economic development plans, it is now about to be replaced. The existing facility is old and a recent incident where a Spanish fishing vessel collided with it whilst berthing caused a temporary closure.

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Nutall (now BAM Nutall), the company responsible for the FIPASS pile installation, will complete the construction of the new facility. It will have a solid structure, not piled and floating.

At the end of the project in 2024, FIPASS will be removed after 40 years of service to the islands.

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[Photo: Work has commenced on a new port facility at Port Stanley that will replace the post-conflict FIPASS].


 
Sentries?

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Sentries?

View attachment 605334
Fooking brilliant.
Just bought the full set for my Mrs best mate.. She has gnomes all over her back garden..
 
Seeing as we don't have a thread specifically for blonde burds I'll leave this here for your delectation.

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