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She was a high class escort apparently

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I doubt even @don't tell him pike would pay a sixpence

Fortunately I am of the lower orders and wouldn't have come across him/her.
 

HE117

LE
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NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
The Chelsea Pensioners have their own plot in Brookwood. I used to go there fairly regularly when I was on the Staff at South East District to attend funerals of RAOC and RASC pensioners. The standard gag was that it was the only cemetery section with its own bar (.. members only!)..

I can remember going to these events, but my recollection of the return journey is somewhat hazy...!

Another branch off the Brookwood line used to go into the NRA Bisley site and there were regular "Bisley Bullet" trains during the Imperial Meeting!
 
A veeery palatable ultra-squidgy black....only had half a joint so far and well pleased....bit pricey at 18 Euros the gramme but worth it. The fact that I just spunked 4.80 on a medium tub of homemade blueberry ice cream is a pretty sharp indicator that this is indeed good gear ! ;)
Cost more hthangold
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
Train spotter
 
It's the fashion:
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
You've missed out my favourite book
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Necropolis railways, devil worshipers, Boney Fuller and Arthur Ransom (in his spy phase) - all told in the style of Anthony Price. Whats not to like?
 
You've missed out my favourite book
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Necropolis railways, devil worshipers, Boney Fuller and Arthur Ransom (in his spy phase) - all told in the style of Anthony Price. Whats not to like?
Excellent series, but it does get a bit dark and gloomy in the later books. I did like the bit (in a later book) where Army Apaches took on dragons and elves. Iirc, the elf lords were quite surprised (very, very briefly) by Hellfires.
 
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endure

GCM
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Another call to arms for BAOR veterans? :grin:
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