All Internet links/videos/pictures in here ONLY

vinniethemanxcat

On ROPS
On ROPs
She was a high class escort apparently

View attachment 478231

I doubt even @don't tell him pike would pay a sixpence
I think in her case, high class probably means she worked indoors rather than in her punters' cars or up a scabby back-alley.
 
1591000113837.png



NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
33900810_10156411443803524_4331469750602301440_n.jpg
 
1591003046201.png
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
Read a book about this not so long ago. Although the book was fiction, a lot of what the author wrote was true.
51h+OAl6uSL._SX310_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
An interesting work of faction.
 
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
Was that line a dead end?
 
1591004445821.png

A lot of the infrastructure is still there at Brookwood Station ........Brookwood is a excellent visit IMHO.
 
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey . . . .
There is/was also, a very interesting TV programme about it . . . 'though I cannot now remember the channel/broadcaster :( .
 
Was that line a dead end?
Some of the tickets were only one way. On the plus side, those tickets guaranteed you a lie down on the journey.
 
View attachment 478356


NECROPOLIS : London : 1854

It's a largely-forgotten fact, but London once hosted a train built entirely for the purposes of transporting dead bodies!

Every day, at its peak from the late 1880s to the early 1900s, the London Necropolis Railway ferried more than 2,000 corpses a year from a purpose-built station near Waterloo directly to the Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey.

It was first developed in 1854 in response to both a recent cholera epidemic and chronic overcrowding in London cemeteries at the time, and the service was designed to transport not just the dead, but their relatives and funeral-goers too.
As far as is know, it was the first use of the railway for a dedicated service from one private station, directly into a cemetery at the other end.
London mourners would generally have the bodies of their deceased taken in a hearse to the York Street station, which was reserved for this purpose alone and had waiting rooms for both upper and lower class funeral-goers.
The nearby Waterloo tunnels often served as temporary storage for the corpses.
From there the coffins would be loaded onto the train, where they would remain in a separate carriage from the living. At the end of the 40-minute journey to the Surrey cemetery, funerals would be attended followed by refreshments including ham sandwiches and fairy cakes.
For mourners, the trip - departing in the late morning and returning in the late afternoon - cost the equivalent of £25 for a return first class ticket, and around £8 for third class.
In 1904, Railway Magazine rather poetically wrote of it: 'Possibly this is the most peaceful railway station in the three corners of the kingdom - this station of the dead.
'But this is a sad station, the saddest in our islands.'
A number of factors contributed to the demise of the railway, the first being the introduction of the motor hearse in 1909, which eventually negated the need for horse-drawn carriages and then the train.
But it officially met its end during World War II when The Blitz bombings destroyed the London station on April 16, 1941.
I never knew of that service until I saw it included in one of Michael Portillo's UK Railway Journey's using Bradshaw as his guide .... linky below .... regrettably currently not available ...

 

Latest Threads

Top