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Just done a bit of research on this gent.
Pre war he was a very successful TT racer, but also learnt to fly. He had access/ part owned an SE5a, a Bristol Fighter and a Puss Moth.
At the start of WW2, he volunteered for the Air Transport Auxiliary. By 1941 he was OC No3 Ferry Pilot Pool ATA, on 15th Nov 41 he was up at Kirkbride to ferry a Bell P39 Airacobra AH598. Shortly after takeoff the engine caught fire and was killed in the subsequent crash. The inquiry failed to find the cause of the fire.
 
Just done a bit of research on this gent.
Pre war he was a very successful TT racer, but also learnt to fly. He had access/ part owned an SE5a, a Bristol Fighter and a Puss Moth.
At the start of WW2, he volunteered for the Air Transport Auxiliary. By 1941 he was OC No3 Ferry Pilot Pool ATA, on 15th Nov 41 he was up at Kirkbride to ferry a Bell P39 Airacobra AH598. Shortly after takeoff the engine caught fire and was killed in the subsequent crash. The inquiry failed to find the cause of the fire.
Not so re the enqirey ( he crashed at fingland on climb out, about 800 yards from my old house at Kirkbride)
he didn’t have the crib sheet for the airacobra in his notes and there was a small innocuous switch by his elbow to arm/ disarm the prop governor. This had to be on for takeoff.
poor Walter neglected to set this so the engine over revved on climb out,and threw a rod/ blew up. Hence the fire.
He then spun in trying to make the turn back to the airfield.
This was told to me by an old lad who was a fitter at Kirkbride at the time.
The ATA subsequently made sure the handling notes system was more robustly promogulated ( not a word I use often nowadays)
yours CB.
 
Not so re the enqirey ( he crashed at fingland on climb out, about 800 yards from my old house at Kirkbride)
he didn’t have the crib sheet for the airacobra in his notes and there was a small innocuous switch by his elbow to arm/ disarm the prop governor. This had to be on for takeoff.
poor Walter neglected to set this so the engine over revved on climb out,and threw a rod/ blew up. Hence the fire.
He then spun in trying to make the turn back to the airfield.
This was told to me by an old lad who was a fitter at Kirkbride at the time.
The ATA subsequently made sure the handling notes system was more robustly promogulated ( not a word I use often nowadays)
yours CB.
That’s interesting, I took that info off Wiki. I’ve read about the note books they carried,
which carried the relevant information about every aircraft they were cleared to fly.
As the notes were missing from his book, is that possibly because the type was new to the ATA?
 
That’s interesting, I took that info off Wiki. I’ve read about the note books they carried,
which carried the relevant information about every aircraft they were cleared to fly.
As the notes were missing from his book, is that possibly because the type was new to the ATA?
I read a book about the ATA some while ago and there was mention of a “standard” set of checks used from memory which would get you from A to B on the vast majority of contemporary aircraft. Things like flaps, mixture, propellor pitch etc. Pilots would go through the list and set the appropriate setting for whatever stage of the flight they were at - pre takeoff, cruise pre landing etc.

All well and good until more technically sophisticated machines come along.
 

dwills

War Hero
Stopped wearing a watch 21 years ago after losing two in quick succession at work,
Hope you weren't a gynaecologist....
 
I read a book about the ATA some while ago and there was mention of a “standard” set of checks used from memory which would get you from A to B on the vast majority of contemporary aircraft. Things like flaps, mixture, propellor pitch etc. Pilots would go through the list and set the appropriate setting for whatever stage of the flight they were at - pre takeoff, cruise pre landing etc.

All well and good until more technically sophisticated machines come along.
A ringbinder you could add types to.
for example the Wellington had 3 different double sided cribs. Each one covering a spread of different marks. ( engine handling t and ps could be very different on different marks of engine in ostensibly similar airframes.also individual controls sometimes got moved to a different position between marks.
As said early in the war lots of types were fairly simple but very rapidly types evolved with lethal little gotchas if mishandled.
finally when American types came in the American aversion to any kind of automated engine management meant that some engines needed an insane amount of careful handling to avoid engines stopping.
hence the latter ata handling notes.( I have one on my bookshelf at home)
 
Hope you weren't a gynaecologist....
I used to be one. I'm retired now but I still like to keep my hand in. I gave it up when I was up to my elbows in work. Women prefer the older ones, our hands shake. Very talented. In my prime I could have wallpapered a hallway through the letterbox.
 
 

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