All Internet links/videos/pictures in here ONLY

Looks good but I bet the bottom half inch of the sandwich has nothing in it.
The top half will fill you up and the bottom half can be used to mop up any spillages from the top? Looks very tasty indeed.

Edit - the size of the bread reminds me of how we used to eat at school, early '70s. Nip out to the local chippy, where they're supply half a hollowed out loaf crammed with chips. Lush.
 
The top half will fill you up and the bottom half can be used to mop up any spillages from the top? Looks very tasty indeed.
Agreed, but if they built it in the time-honoured fashion, it would be tasty all the way through!
 
Last edited:
Agreed, but it they built it in the time-honoured fashion, it would be tasty all the way through!
Just be a messy eater, thus ensuring lots of spillage for the bottom half :rolleyes:
 

HE117

LE
I cannot recall this being posted before and at only ~47 mins long it seems a fairly concise history …. it brings together test and actual battle field footage … I did not realise that the “ Sabot Round “ concept had been developed in the days of sailing ships … as well demonstrated at ~ 28 mins .

I think that over simplifies the issue somewhat. The sabot as used in APDS/APFSDS is doing something different to that on the cannon...

The sabot on the cannon is simply reducing the windage (gap between proj and bore), reducing the gas leakage and improving the power transfer. Any rifled system will do the same as the bullet or driving band engraves on the bore..

The sabot on the piercing projectile is doing something different.. it is transforming a large, light projectile with a big base area, which is the ideal shape for energy transfer in a gun, to a small, dense projectile with a small cross section which is the ideal shape to minimise air resistance and maximise penetration of the target..

The first weapon system to do this was the Gerlach tapered bore gun, which was copied by the allies as the Littlejohn adaptor for the 2lbr tank gun. The crews discovered that there was not that much difference in performance between firing the Littlejohn with or without the tapered muzzle attachment, and hence APCR (Armour Piercing Composite Rigid) was developed for the 17pdr which then led to the APDS for the 20pdr.

As for Catweasle and his "Pyrotechnics".. don't get me started!
 
I think that over simplifies the issue somewhat. The sabot as used in APDS/APFSDS is doing something different to that on the cannon...

The sabot on the cannon is simply reducing the windage (gap between proj and bore), reducing the gas leakage and improving the power transfer. Any rifled system will do the same as the bullet or driving band engraves on the bore..

The sabot on the piercing projectile is doing something different.. it is transforming a large, light projectile with a big base area, which is the ideal shape for energy transfer in a gun, to a small, dense projectile with a small cross section which is the ideal shape to minimise air resistance and maximise penetration of the target..

The first weapon system to do this was the Gerlach tapered bore gun, which was copied by the allies as the Littlejohn adaptor for the 2lbr tank gun. The crews discovered that there was not that much difference in performance between firing the Littlejohn with or without the tapered muzzle attachment, and hence APCR (Armour Piercing Composite Rigid) was developed for the 17pdr which then led to the APDS for the 20pdr.

As for Catweasle and his "Pyrotechnics".. don't get me started!
I have a feeling I may have to accede to your greater knowledge and terminology in this area .... certainly an interesting technique to increase range / penetration of cannon balls .... but the demo has made me think again .... bursting through two layers of wood feet apart demonstrated reduced wood splinter ( fragmentation ) inside the " vessel " ... and thus fewer casualties .... could have been a balancing act of range / correct penetration / wood splintering .
 

HE117

LE
I have a feeling I may have to accede to your greater knowledge and terminology in this area .... certainly an interesting technique to increase range / penetration of cannon balls .... but the demo has made me think again .... bursting through two layers of wood feet apart demonstrated reduced wood splinter ( fragmentation ) inside the " vessel " ... and thus fewer casualties .... could have been a balancing act of range / correct penetration / wood splintering .
To be honest, I don't believe the first round with the bare shot is realistic.. I'm not aware that it was ever normal practice to load a cannon without some form of wad.. it was usual to ram some form of flexible wad over the powder such as straw, turf or felt.. in fact I suspect the term "tammy" for a knitted wool hat derived from "tompion" or "tampon" as the name for a fibre wad!

The reason for attaching a sabot on roundshot was to speed loading, as only one ram was required.. I have a feeling that some of them had a felt wad attached to the base, but I cannot be certain!

You could try and suggest that certain Scots regiments wore tampons on their head, but you would be a braver man than me!
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top