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Ah the halcyon days of post war motoring development … none of your poofery of seat belts , air bags , trafficators , anti theft systems , complex electronics or engine management systems for the motor cycle engine ... just an egg shell body held together by pop rivets over what looks like a really sturdy base … Hi Hi.
I was impressed by the subtle touch of the steering wheel pointing towards the head ready for instant decapitation as the result of a head on collision and bits of the wiring harness discretely hanging under the bodywork . I wonder if more than ten of these death traps were produced .

I give you ... the ATOM ...



ETA Later discovered 44 were manufactured .... Linky ... Fairthorpe Cars - Wikipedia
They weren't looked upon as death traps in those days, just economical motoring
 
They weren't looked upon as death traps in those days, just economical motoring
My dad had one, and I do remember being able to have a protracted conversation whilst waiting for the brakes to work whilst going downhill, fortunately, there weren't many other cars around then
 
They weren't looked upon as death traps in those days, just economical motoring
My Post was very much tongue in cheek and some subsequent models made by Fairthorpe were indeed impressive , presumably based on lessons learned with the ATOM …. I agree there certainly was a need to produce economical new cars in a time of real austerity .

I can remember in the early 60’s and long before MOT Tests driving cars , some pre war , which were absolute death traps including iffy steering , brakes and body corrosion in which you could actually see the road through holes in the floor pan .

I actually knew someone killed in a head on crash by a steering wheel being pushed towards the driver’s seat as he was propelled forward because seat belts were not fitted .
 
My Post was very much tongue in cheek and some subsequent models made by Fairthorpe were indeed impressive , presumably based on lessons learned with the ATOM …. I agree there certainly was a need to produce economical new cars in a time of real austerity .

I can remember in the early 60’s and long before MOT Tests driving cars , some pre war , which were absolute death traps including iffy steering , brakes and body corrosion in which you could actually see the road through holes in the floor pan .

I actually knew someone killed in a head on crash by a steering wheel being pushed towards the driver’s seat as he was propelled forward because seat belts were not fitted .
My reply wasn't meant to be taken seriously. Truthfully, I have driven several death traps on the road in my youth, mainly involving things like rotten chassis and non functioning brakes. I wouldn't do it now but in my youth it was socially acceptable. I have personally repaired a holed Mini floor with metal mesh and body filler (not proud of that one)
 
My Post was very much tongue in cheek and some subsequent models made by Fairthorpe were indeed impressive , presumably based on lessons learned with the ATOM …. I agree there certainly was a need to produce economical new cars in a time of real austerity .

I can remember in the early 60’s and long before MOT Tests driving cars , some pre war , which were absolute death traps including iffy steering , brakes and body corrosion in which you could actually see the road through holes in the floor pan .

I actually knew someone killed in a head on crash by a steering wheel being pushed towards the driver’s seat as he was propelled forward because seat belts were not fitted .

My first car, bought off a lad I knew, for £50 with 10 months MOT....... got my money's worth out of it, a Morris 1000 van.

Disasterous fail, rotten chassis, petrol tank held on with twisted wire coathangers etc.

Wish I'd had the money to restore it.

Sold it to a local pikey for £30, and I heard he'd been seen for a long while after, driving it around.
 

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