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Nicola getting a long overdue clipped ear

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WRONG, rice is a grain. so it's beer, so is barley wine. You thick ****.
No need for foul language.
Sake (Japanese: 酒, [sake]), also spelled saké (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ SAH-kay US also /ˈsɑːki/ SAH-kee),[1][2] also referred to as Japanese rice wine,[3] is an alcoholic beverage made by fermenting rice that has been polished to remove the bran. Despite the name, unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in fruit (typically grapes), sake is produced by a brewing process more akin to that of beer, where starch is converted into sugars, which ferment into alcohol.
The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, where the conversion from starch to sugar and then from sugar to alcohol occurs in two distinct steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer; while most beer contains 3–9% ABV, wine generally contains 9–16% ABV,[4], and undiluted sake contains 18–20% ABV (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).
Wikipedia.
 

morsk

LE
Too long. 'Tosser' 'll do!
Hahaha I was thinking after road closed it would just say "Fookin Queers" in big letters. I am not a Yorkshireman, but I do know they dont waste words. Or anything.
 
No need for foul language.
Sake (Japanese: 酒, [sake]), also spelled saké (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ SAH-kay US also /ˈsɑːki/ SAH-kee),[1][2] also referred to as Japanese rice wine,[3] is an alcoholic beverage made by fermenting rice that has been polished to remove the bran. Despite the name, unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in fruit (typically grapes), sake is produced by a brewing process more akin to that of beer, where starch is converted into sugars, which ferment into alcohol.
The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, where the conversion from starch to sugar and then from sugar to alcohol occurs in two distinct steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer; while most beer contains 3–9% ABV, wine generally contains 9–16% ABV,[4], and undiluted sake contains 18–20% ABV (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).
Wikipedia.
Wiki is not a credible source, and rice is also used as an ingredient in many popular beers, Bud, Cobra, Kingfisher etc. Am I expected to believe the rice in them magically undergoes a different proccess to the rice in sake? Also some beers have had higher ABV than the modal in your cut and paste.

  • Sam Adams Utopias - 29% ABV. ...
  • BrewDog Tactical Nuclear Penguin - 32% ABV. ...
  • Struise Black Damnation VI, Messy - 39% ABV. ...
  • BrewDog Sink The Bismarck - 41% ABV. ...
  • Schorschbräu Schorschbock 42% - 42% ABV. ...
  • Schorschbräu Schorschbock 57% - 57% ABV. ...
  • Brewmeister Armageddon - 65% ABV. ...
  • Brewmeister Snake Venom - 67.5% ABV


Also it's the NAAFI

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FB_IMG_1568515869240.jpg
 

dwills

War Hero
Nicola getting a long overdue clipped ear

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
Classic failure to understand what was going to happen, how it was going to affect someone, and the likely suffering, welcome to nationalist policies.
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, where the conversion from starch to sugar and then from sugar to alcohol occurs in two distinct steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously.
Sake - being Japanese - is seriously weird.

They use an Aspergillus fungus (one of the less toxic ones) to convert the starch into sugar!

To quote from further down the same Wikipedia text.
Kōji-kin[edit]
Kōji-kin (Aspergillus oryzae) spores are another important component of sake. Kōji-kin is an enzyme-secreting fungus.[15] In Japan, kōji-kin is used to make various fermented foods, including miso (a paste made from soybeans) and shoyu (soy sauce).[15] It is also used to make alcoholic beverages, notably sake.[15] During sake brewing, spores of kōji-kin are scattered over steamed rice to produce kōji (rice in which kōji-kin spores are cultivated).[16] Under warm and moist conditions, the kōji-kin spores germinate and release enzymes called amylases that convert the rice starches into glucose.[17] This process of starch conversion into simpler sugars (e.g. glucose or maltose) is called saccharification.[18] Yeast then turns this glucose into alcohol via fermentation.

When assessing its safety, it is important to note that A. oryzae lacks the ability to produce toxins, unlike the closely related Aspergillus flavus.[15] To date, there have been only several reported cases of animals (e.g. parrots, a horse) being infected with A. oryzae.[19] In these cases, however, the animals infected with A. oryzae were already weakened due to predisposing conditions like recent injury, illness, or stress, and were therefore especially susceptible to infections in general.[19] Aside from these cases, there is no evidence to indicate A. oryzae is a harmful pathogen - unlike A.fumigatus Aspergillus fumigatus - Wikipedia

So thats OK then!
 
Sake - being Japanese - is seriously weird.

They use an Aspergillus fungus (one of the less toxic ones) to convert the starch into sugar!

To quote from further down the same Wikipedia text.
Kōji-kin[edit]
Kōji-kin (Aspergillus oryzae) spores are another important component of sake. Kōji-kin is an enzyme-secreting fungus.[15] In Japan, kōji-kin is used to make various fermented foods, including miso (a paste made from soybeans) and shoyu (soy sauce).[15] It is also used to make alcoholic beverages, notably sake.[15] During sake brewing, spores of kōji-kin are scattered over steamed rice to produce kōji (rice in which kōji-kin spores are cultivated).[16] Under warm and moist conditions, the kōji-kin spores germinate and release enzymes called amylases that convert the rice starches into glucose.[17] This process of starch conversion into simpler sugars (e.g. glucose or maltose) is called saccharification.[18] Yeast then turns this glucose into alcohol via fermentation.

When assessing its safety, it is important to note that A. oryzae lacks the ability to produce toxins, unlike the closely related Aspergillus flavus.[15] To date, there have been only several reported cases of animals (e.g. parrots, a horse) being infected with A. oryzae.[19] In these cases, however, the animals infected with A. oryzae were already weakened due to predisposing conditions like recent injury, illness, or stress, and were therefore especially susceptible to infections in general.[19] Aside from these cases, there is no evidence to indicate A. oryzae is a harmful pathogen - unlike A.fumigatus Aspergillus fumigatus - Wikipedia

So thats OK then!
Still tastes like shït though
 
Sake - being Japanese - is seriously weird.

They use an Aspergillus fungus (one of the less toxic ones) to convert the starch into sugar!

To quote from further down the same Wikipedia text.
Kōji-kin[edit]
Kōji-kin (Aspergillus oryzae) spores are another important component of sake. Kōji-kin is an enzyme-secreting fungus.[15] In Japan, kōji-kin is used to make various fermented foods, including miso (a paste made from soybeans) and shoyu (soy sauce).[15] It is also used to make alcoholic beverages, notably sake.[15] During sake brewing, spores of kōji-kin are scattered over steamed rice to produce kōji (rice in which kōji-kin spores are cultivated).[16] Under warm and moist conditions, the kōji-kin spores germinate and release enzymes called amylases that convert the rice starches into glucose.[17] This process of starch conversion into simpler sugars (e.g. glucose or maltose) is called saccharification.[18] Yeast then turns this glucose into alcohol via fermentation.

When assessing its safety, it is important to note that A. oryzae lacks the ability to produce toxins, unlike the closely related Aspergillus flavus.[15] To date, there have been only several reported cases of animals (e.g. parrots, a horse) being infected with A. oryzae.[19] In these cases, however, the animals infected with A. oryzae were already weakened due to predisposing conditions like recent injury, illness, or stress, and were therefore especially susceptible to infections in general.[19] Aside from these cases, there is no evidence to indicate A. oryzae is a harmful pathogen - unlike A.fumigatus Aspergillus fumigatus - Wikipedia

So thats OK then!
But it’s still not beer.
 

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