All American Week — 82nd Airborne Division

#1
Paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division present their colors during the Division Review May 18, at Pike Field, Fort Bragg, N.C. The Division Review is held as part of the All-American Week.
 

Attachments

#3
A couple of pictures of the 82nd AB's tribute to those Paratroopers KIA in the Global War on Terror.
 

Attachments

#4
Interesting beret shaping. Or not.
Again, half of this unit has to sit down to urinate. What physical jerks are required to become a US Skygod?
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#5
Interesting beret shaping. Or not.
Again, half of this unit has to sit down to urinate. What physical jerks are required to become a US Skygod?
I have never knowingly written anything on this site that even generally supports Trip, but I do have to ask.

Are you sponsored by Crayola?

I only ask, because you seem to crayon over any number of threads with your pseudo-machismo almost intact.
 
#6
Thanks Trip, brings back memories.
 
#7
I have never knowingly written anything on this site that even generally supports Trip, but I do have to ask.

Are you sponsored by Crayola?

I only ask, because you seem to crayon over any number of threads with your pseudo-machismo almost intact.
Careful, he's proper str8, innit. It says so in his name.
 
#8
I remember stuff like this. I used to get out of it all the time though. Being Audie Murphy height I was almost always an odd man out and then given the "lucky sob, ok get out of here..."
 
#9
Interesting beret shaping. Or not.
Again, half of this unit has to sit down to urinate. What physical jerks are required to become a US Skygod?
If you consider that we have an (airborne) Engineer Brigade that alone outnumbers the total Brit para force you'd understand. I have my own views on females in the airborne but I will concede I've met some jumpmasters of the opposite sex that were tough as hell.
 
#11
I have my own views on females in the airborne but I will concede I've met some jumpmasters of the opposite sex that were tough as hell.
And the good thing is, you can tell whether it's worth tapping by the noise it makes on the way down.

...a deep bass humming noise means slack as a clown's pocket, and probably had half the company. A high-pitched, flute-like melody on the other hand...




On a serious note, I've noted a very high proportion of US soldiers with either airborne or ranger badges - are these run as cadres for all combat MOS?
 
#12
It always amazes me, when looking at the shear manpower available to the yanks war machine!

Though I do have to question the course standards when checking out the WRAC arrses on these 2.
Being females they're probably at division level as support staff or in the MI BN.
 
#13
And the good thing is, you can tell whether it's worth tapping by the noise it makes on the way down.

...a deep bass humming noise means slack as a clown's pocket, and probably had half the company. A high-pitched, flute-like melody on the other hand...
Lol.

On a serious note, I've noted a very high proportion of US soldiers with either airborne or ranger badges - are these run as cadres for all combat MOS?
The airborne school runs at least four companies--Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta--if I remember correctly, year round for a 3-week course. That means there are a lot of slots available, so there are a lot of spaces available to fill [rather than stand the training companies down]. Officers get slots often when they're still in officer training (ROTC) or the academies, sometimes soldiers who re-enlist are given a slot, sometimes it's an enlistment incentive, as a requirement to be slotted in an airborne unit and so on. Those who get wings but never go to an airborne unit are called "Five Jump Chumps" (5 jumps the minimum requirement).
 
#14
All very fascinating stuff, but what are the physical standards, or qualifying tests, necessary to get on this course?
Besides filling in the forms and turning up.
 
#15
All very fascinating stuff, but what are the physical standards, or qualifying tests, necessary to get on this course?
Besides filling in the forms and turning up.
Let's put it this way when in mid-85 I went to Airborne School on Ft Benning they'd just ended the ability of the cadre to physically hit you, shortly after my stint they stopped sending trainees to the 'pit' for punishment in the Georgia heat, in '87 the first female cadre was brought on, running shoes were substituted for combat boots during PT (probably a good thing) and so on.

Army airborne training is just a cattle call now, a shadow of what it once was during the Vietnam era.
 
#16
Let's put it this way when in mid-85 I went to Airborne School on Ft Benning they'd just ended the ability of the cadre to physically hit you, shortly after my stint they stopped sending trainees to the 'pit' for punishment in the Georgia heat, in '87 the first female cadre was brought on, running shoes were substituted for combat boots during PT (probably a good thing) and so on.

Army airborne training is just a cattle call now, a shadow of what it once was during the Vietnam era.
I remember talking to a Danish airborne engineer. In the early 90s the Danish airborne selection criteria were ruled to be discriminatory. The physical requirements were drastically reduced to allow women to become paratroopers. A lot of the existing Paras left in disgust; a number continued soldiering in the Foreign Legion.
 
#18
If you consider that we have an (airborne) Engineer Brigade that alone outnumbers the total Brit para force you'd understand. I have my own views on females in the airborne but I will concede I've met some jumpmasters of the opposite sex that were tough as hell.
You may well have a large Engineer Brigade but they would be put on their fat arses, nae bother, by our boys.
 
#19
Let's put it this way when in mid-85 I went to Airborne School on Ft Benning they'd just ended the ability of the cadre to physically hit you, shortly after my stint they stopped sending trainees to the 'pit' for punishment in the Georgia heat, in '87 the first female cadre was brought on, running shoes were substituted for combat boots during PT (probably a good thing) and so on.

Army airborne training is just a cattle call now, a shadow of what it once was during the Vietnam era.
Thanks for the truth Virgil. Explains some of the defensive posts here. Hopefully OIF and OEF will knock the politically correct pussification ideas out of people's heads, and a new generation will emerge.
 
#20
You may well have a large Engineer Brigade but they would be put on their fat arses, nae bother, by our boys.
My father can beat up your father.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top