Alexander Blackman BBC Interview

He did it, he was a c*nt, he got found guilty, it transpired that he was a c*nt with issues, he got found a bit less guilty. He did the crime, then his time, he has been rehabilitated, he is trying to get on with his life the best way he can by making a few bob for his family.

Done, dusted, move on ^~
 

Poppycock

Clanker
My edits in bold:

He did it, he may have been a c*nt, but the senior commanders were warned about that and they chose to ignore those warnings, he got found guilty after Colonel Lee was prevented from giving mitigating evidence, it transpired that he may have been a c*nt, but he did have combat stress/fatigue issues that the senior command were warned about but chose to ignore, he got found a bit less guilty. He did the crime, then his time, he has been rehabilitated, he is trying to get on with his life the best way he can by making a few bob for his family.

Done, dusted, let him move on but ffs do something about the senior command that really didn't know what they were doing in Helmand and cared even less about the consequences of that for those under their command ^~
 
My edits in bold:
Senior Commanders, should be held to account, but hell will freeze over first, the mitigating evidence wouldn’t have changed the facts of what he did. But I don’t disagree with the gist of your edit.
 
My edits in bold:
I’m don’t know enough about the involvement of senior officers in this case or the concerns which were expressed but I still don’t think what happened was an aberration. If people are in combat for prolonged periods of time* I think instances like this will occur.

It seems to me like they happened throughout history yet we are shocked that the people we charge with killing people become comfortable (too comfortable for us to be happy about it) with killing people.

*and I don’t see how rotating troops regularly enough to stop this from happening is realistic or even useful
 

Poppycock

Clanker
*and I don’t see how rotating troops regularly enough to stop this from happening is realistic or even useful
I think that's probably right, but I've never been close enough to anything to know the answer.

I do bet that if the senior officers who ignored the warnings had been put in the dock at Blackman's trial and made to answer for their lack of actions on the warnings, I bet the next lot of senior officers would find a solution pretty damn quickly. Giving them medals & promotions instead means nothing's been learnt (apart from switching helmet cams off) and this is very likely to happen again - the poor c*nt on the front line getting hung out to dry when things go tits up.
 
The yanks in the Pacific,facing a particularly vicious enemy,tended to do the same.
The Moosies don't tend to treat prisoners very well.
 
There have been references to LOAC, The Geneva Convention and probably a few others made above.

I think that is part of the problem.

We expect our Armed Forces to rigorously adhere to various Laws, Conventions, treaties and Principles, yet conveniently forget that the opposing force could not give a flying about those Laws, Conventions, Treaties and Principles.

Is that really fair ?

I have heard all the arguments about We are better than that, or That makes us just the same as them. Which might be true, but when you throw Soldiers into a sh!thole, it is highly likely that a small minority of them will go off the reservation and that should come as no surprise to anyone.

As for Blackman - He did what he did, served his time and time for him to move on.
 
Do be careful, I don't believe that the moral or ethical issues on which we can be judged can be factored as a number.
Good point, numbers is not the moral issue.

Thing is, when this actually hit the headlines, my gut reaction was that it didnt bother me in the slightest. Not whoops of joy , rounds of applause etc, just a sort of 'Good - another dead terrorist '.

I knew it was technicaly murder and that he had broken the Rules of Engagement and Geneva Convention ( both of which I most definitely understand the need for ) but I was glad he didnt call in a helicopter, putting their lives at risk.

And so how do I square this all up ?

I dont think the Geneva Conventions , much unchanged since they were first agreed and written, anticipated worldwide Jihad and are unfit to be used as the arbiter of right and wrong in this new situation.

ISIS et al are not a conventional army fighting with conventional rules, win or lose able to re-enter decent society after ceasefire.
They are a plague, a cancer in the world and should be destroyed every time they rear up. Taking them prisoner is pointless as they will kill again when released, and we do have a habit of releasing them.

I gave up believing in Redemption a long time ago.
 
There have been references to LOAC, The Geneva Convention and probably a few others made above.

I think that is part of the problem.

We expect our Armed Forces to rigorously adhere to various Laws, Conventions, treaties and Principles, yet conveniently forget that the opposing force could not give a flying about those Laws, Conventions, Treaties and Principles.

Is that really fair ?

I have heard all the arguments about We are better than that, or That makes us just the same as them.
I think it’s more than that, I think that as a society we can just about get our heads around the fact that our soldiers, sailors and airmen may have to kill people, but we’re not comfortable with them being okay about it. It’s almost expected that they’ll be somehow traumatised by the act. We really can’t get our heads around the fact that some of them might even enjoy it.

We seem to have made a virtue of the reluctant warrior.
 
The difference between us and them is that we're not the same as them. Nor should we be.
Which I addressed in my comment.

I also addressed in my comment that if you put Soldiers in a sh!thole, it is beyond belief to believe that a very small percentage of them will not snap.

Regardless of Laws, Conventions, Treaties or Training.
 
Which I addressed in my comment.

I also addressed in my comment that if you put Soldiers in a sh!thole, it is beyond belief to believe that a very small percentage of them will not snap.

Regardless of Laws, Conventions, Treaties or Training.
we shouldnt be surprised by it, but we should lock them up for it.

it'd say its no different to civvy street. we're not surprised that some people break the law, often there are mitigating reasons why they did so, but we still accept that we lock them up.
 
Downgraded I believe to manslaughter. Which is just a tad strange given he was caught on camera moving the victim to the site of the murder, was film carrying out the murder and then telling his lads to keep schtum as he had committed a crime. Deliberate unlawful killing being murder...

The grounds for his verdict and sentence being overturned/downgraded should have been mitigation of punishment and not a defence of his actions as a crime.
Moved the victim behind a low wall ensuring he couldn't be seen by ISTAR assets, IIRC.
 
And Blackman got locked up for it.
he did.

i was on the outrage bus when this first broke, mainly because there were those that argued he'd done nothing wrong. once i manage to fight my way to the front and get off again i engaged my brain a bit and started to think it though.

personally i can understand him shooting the guy, i'm not actually that bothered about it, but i also believe that he knew what he was doing was wrong*. as such he got caught doing it on camera so he needs to go though due process and face the law; because we are a civilised society and dems the rules.

i think he got of lightly, in my opinion it was murder and he got lucky on the manslaughter conviction. that said, given the fact that i can understand why he did it and dont care about the guy he killed, then i'm glad he managed to get off lightly.

i wish him all the best but think he might have to go a long way to get out from under the shadow of it.



* or at least that it was against the law. the manslaughter decision seemed to hinge on the idea that his state of mind was significantly skewed by his exposure to combat....well, duh! of course it was, my opinion is just that this is a natural phenomena. but i still think he knew that what he was doing could have consequences if caught
 
Which I addressed in my comment.

I also addressed in my comment that if you put Soldiers in a sh!thole, it is beyond belief to believe that a very small percentage of them will not snap.

Regardless of Laws, Conventions, Treaties or Training.
Which is why the discipline system should come down on them like a ton of bricks - especially those who're in a position of authority and have the responsibility for ensuring others don't breach the standards of a professional military.
 

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