Aldershot..'Overwhelmed by Nepalese'

I have had the misfortune of living next to a Gurkha family for the last five years in the MQs in Aldershot, he is a member of the welfare department for 10 Reg, however all I have seen him do is use a military vehicle to drive his kids and wife round every day.

We have had huge problems with them having other families living there and through complaint they have been removed three times and at one point they had people living in their garage, DHE refused to belive this until they finally investigated and caught them. The biggest issues are the noise, the fires in the garden and the fact that even though the families living there have gone its still like living next to a hotel.

Nothing like naming and shaming.....if i could be bothered i would do something about it but as i fly out to Afghan tomorrow i cant. But if what you say is happening then give 10 Regt Welfare a ring or the Rear Party CO who is the QM. But be careful, as a long time serving Gurkha Regt member, you may experience the G Factor and nothing will be done about it!!!
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
But it makes him look edgy, a bit of a rebel and therefore not gagging to be a moderator.


It's probably on page one of the Ladybird book of Reverse Psychology.

Time you changed your record, the needle must be getting tuck in hat grove.

Jussus but that was a bite !
Fcuking shame you've fallen off the wagon already.
 
In all seriousness the norm in Aldershot, with DHE being loath to actually do anything about it

When outbuildings start being used for accommodation, (endemic in parts of west London) it's clearly gone beyond putting up visiting friends and relatives, and become a source of income.

According to Rushmoor Council there has been a 'significant' rise in housing benefit paid in the last couple of years, post Joanna.

That's understandable. But as a result, there is serious money to be made by Nepalese 'landlords', and it wouldn't be too surprising if the practice has been extended to SFA.
 
This is why it's an incredibly stupid idea to recruit colonial soldiers to fight your wars. If you cannot convince your own native citizens to do so, it's probably not a good idea or worth fighting in the first place.

That's a very intelligent assessment by you. Should I have the names of both my Great Grandfathers removed from the WWI memorials then?
How about handing back all the Grandfathers, fathers and assorted uncles medals?
After all, I wouldn't want you to be offended by the thought that loads of foreigners had fought, and many died for 'your' country.
 
This is why it's an incredibly stupid idea to recruit colonial soldiers to fight your wars. If you cannot convince your own native citizens to do so, it's probably not a good idea or worth fighting in the first place.


Whilst I wouldn't argue with your second point- especially as a contemporary issue, it's perhaps worth mentioning that Gurkhas were not colonial soldiers in the sense of the word. Nepal was pretty much a closed, independent country.

Before 1947 (-ish) even British officers weren't allowed to enter the country.
 
Sat having a chat with about 20 ex-Gurkas outside the High Court today. They were up hearing a decision on whether they will be allowed to keep their kids here or not, I think. There was no press coverage (I was waiting to film Andrew Marr going in) and I haven't seen anything about the case recently. They later came out of court and seemed pretty happy and gave the impression they had won.

Sadly when they were all gathered around outside the court with their traditionally dressed wives - they looked very awkward and out of place. I can see why many of them gathered around public places in Aldershot may seem slightly incongruous. The old boy's I spoke to said that they struggle to live on their pensions ( less than a 10th of UK Soldiers') and don't exactly have hobbies.

Tricky.
 
If they had stayed in Nepal they wouldn't be struggling to live on their pensions. Maybe you could send them all round to that nice Ms Lumley.
 

X59

LE
Sat having a chat with about 20 ex-Gurkas outside the High Court today. They were up hearing a decision on whether they will be allowed to keep their kids here or not, I think. There was no press coverage (I was waiting to film Andrew Marr going in) and I haven't seen anything about the case recently. They later came out of court and seemed pretty happy and gave the impression they had won.

Sadly when they were all gathered around outside the court with their traditionally dressed wives - they looked very awkward and out of place. I can see why many of them gathered around public places in Aldershot may seem slightly incongruous. The old boy's I spoke to said that they struggle to live on their pensions ( less than a 10th of UK Soldiers') and don't exactly have hobbies.

Tricky.

Be careful what you wish for.
 
Sat having a chat with about 20 ex-Gurkas outside the High Court today. They were up hearing a decision on whether they will be allowed to keep their kids here or not, I think. There was no press coverage (I was waiting to film Andrew Marr going in) and I haven't seen anything about the case recently. They later came out of court and seemed pretty happy and gave the impression they had won.

Sadly when they were all gathered around outside the court with their traditionally dressed wives - they looked very awkward and out of place. I can see why many of them gathered around public places in Aldershot may seem slightly incongruous. The old boy's I spoke to said that they struggle to live on their pensions ( less than a 10th of UK Soldiers') and don't exactly have hobbies.

Tricky.

Unfortunately their claim of "will be allowed to keep their kids here or not" gives a misleading impression. These 'kid's' that they are trying to win immigration appeals for, are often in their twenties and thirties, with families of their own.

The deal giving Gurkhas Indefinite Leave to Enter/Remain in UK didn't extend to their over-18 offspring- the Gurkhas are unhappy with that.

They are unhappy with a lot of things, so much so that some Nepalese who have emigrated to the US and Australia (yes there are a number) and have gone down the tradition immigrant path, are starting to look at their UK compatriots as whingers who are wanting everything on a plate.

The claim of Gurkha poverty in this country seems only to date from when the service charities announced they were strapped for cash as a result of the Gurkha influx.

A Gurkha of pensionable age living in UK gets approx £1000 a month, made up of pension credits and housing benefit. Not exactly a fortune, but better that a lot of OAPs in this country.

Difficult to believe that they are that poor when the money remitters in Aldershot appear to be doing very well remitting funds to Nepal and that aged Gurkhas are having to be warned that when they are visiting back home for periods exceeding thirteen weeks that they must declare the fact to DWP.

As for one-tenth of British soldiers pension, that's a new high. Previous claims have run from one-third, right through to one-eight. Gurkhas making higher claims usually also have inflated ideas of how much a British service pensioner gets and when it starts.
 
Regardless of all the negative comments on this subject.

& there are some very valid ones too, that need serious action!

My own take on the situation is, that I would rather be inundated by Nepalese Gurkha families in Aldershot.
Than by the rest of the dross from Asia & the Middle East that is foisted on us!
 

X59

LE
Regardless of all the negative comments on this subject.

& there are some very valid ones too, that need serious action!

My own take on the situation is, that I would rather be inundated by Nepalese Gurkha families in Aldershot.
Than by the rest of the dross from Asia & the Middle East that is foisted on us!

Reasonable point of view, but second and third generation descendants seldom demonstrate the same good qualities as their forefathers.

The dross from Asia & the Middle East foisted on us are good examples.
 
Another point is, that it is depressing reading the comments of the know it all's, who haven't been to the Shot for 10 years but are experts on the subject.

Plus all the local Chav Dross whinging about the Neps (as they call them), When their own total contribution to the country is to sponge & claim all their (entitlements) while never having lifted their fingers to try & find employment.
 
Despite the fact that I have little time for Ms Lumley, I don't think she is getting a fair deal here.

Although this might seem another Daily Mail anti-foreigner/immigration rant, the DM doesn't do articles showing Gurkhas in a bad light and if the sub-editors get their way, they never will.

Instead, this article is simply another round in the on-going pensions claim now that the Gurkha groups are very unhappy with the recently announced results of the parliamentary inquiry - a case of 'be careful of
what you wish for', perhaps.

Lumley clearly doesn't have many fans in Rushmoor but she has especially been a persona non grata with Major Dewan and BGWS since she opted out of supporting the BGWS pension claim and stopped returning his calls.

Lumley has joined Gerald Howarth and Jackie Doyle-Price as people who started out with the best intentions of helping the Gurkhas but failed to keep up with the treadmill of on-going and increasing demands and thus have found themselves on the receiving end of ungrateful invective from the very people they set out to assist.
 

ACAB

LE
Despite the fact that I have little time for Ms Lumley, I don't think she is getting a fair deal here.

Although this might seem another Daily Mail anti-foreigner/immigration rant, the DM doesn't do articles showing Gurkhas in a bad light and if the sub-editors get their way, they never will.

Instead, this article is simply another round in the on-going pensions claim now that the Gurkha groups are very unhappy with the recently announced results of the parliamentary inquiry - a case of 'be careful of
what you wish for', perhaps.

Lumley clearly doesn't have many fans in Rushmoor but she has especially been a persona non grata with Major Dewan and BGWS since she opted out of supporting the BGWS pension claim and stopped returning his calls.

Lumley has joined Gerald Howarth and Jackie Doyle-Price as people who started out with the best intentions of helping the Gurkhas but failed to keep up with the treadmill of on-going and increasing demands and thus have found themselves on the receiving end of ungrateful invective from the very people they set out to assist.

I believe that is the Law of Un-intended Consequences.
 

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