ALCOHOL ABUSE IN ARMED FORCES

#1
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/11/03/nbingedrink103.xml

I hope the link works. Today´s Telegraph has an article that highlights the hazardous culture of binge drinking in the armed forces. This is something that has always worried me, but then I´ve thought that it was a problem throughout our modern chav society and the modern armed forces reflects society. However, apparenty 17% of males in the military have a severe drinking problem compared with just 6% in civvy strasse. It goes on to talk about the ambivalent attitude of the chain of command and the institutionalised drinking that sustains this culture. I agree that there is a problem, do you? Any ideas how to change the culture?
 
#2
Only 17% ? times have changed, mind you i guess the other 83% are on OPs
 
#3
Must be bullsh1t, it says RAF recruits are 'better educated' :)
 
#5
its comparing the Army with the 'general population. It doesn't specify if the 'general population' is the equal age range. It also talks about
Nine per cent of service women reported severe alcohol problems compared to one per cent of female civilians.

Two thirds of men and half of women in the military also admitted to hazardous drinking, where they consume more than 10 pints a week.
Its down to what people are admitting, not what clinical signs there are of heavy drinking. When questioned plenty of people will lie about their drinking habits, either claiming they can drink more than they actually do, or (especially at pulhheems time) claim far less.

This should be seen like any other survey (as thats all it appears to be) - remember that statistics can prove anything you want them to.

Not too long ago there was a confession that the dangerous drinking levels had been 'made up' by a committee using educated guesswork.
 
#6
Bloody media, if I was able to walk at the moment I'd give them a piece of my mind, but since I can't I best crack open another beer.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#7
At pulheems time, when asked how much you drink, just say "as much as the Doc".

Most doctors I worked with were absolute pish heads, but somehow their records always showed consumption in line with medical guidance.
 
#8
Jorrocks said:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/11/03/nbingedrink103.xml

I hope the link works. Today´s Telegraph has an article that highlights the hazardous culture of binge drinking in the armed forces. This is something that has always worried me, but then I´ve thought that it was a problem throughout our modern chav society and the modern armed forces reflects society. However, apparenty 17% of males in the military have a severe drinking problem compared with just 6% in civvy strasse. It goes on to talk about the ambivalent attitude of the chain of command and the institutionalised drinking that sustains this culture. I agree that there is a problem, do you? Any ideas how to change the culture?
Limit the quantity of wine and port at Regimental Dinners? Doctors advise 21 units of alcohol per week - In my Mess, that is easily put down at the Table!
 
#9
Sir_Burton_Dassett said:
Jorrocks said:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/11/03/nbingedrink103.xml

I hope the link works. Today´s Telegraph has an article that highlights the hazardous culture of binge drinking in the armed forces. This is something that has always worried me, but then I´ve thought that it was a problem throughout our modern chav society and the modern armed forces reflects society. However, apparenty 17% of males in the military have a severe drinking problem compared with just 6% in civvy strasse. It goes on to talk about the ambivalent attitude of the chain of command and the institutionalised drinking that sustains this culture. I agree that there is a problem, do you? Any ideas how to change the culture?
Limit the quantity of wine and port at Regimental Dinners? Doctors advise 21 units of alcohol per week - In my Mess, that is easily put down at the Table!
Back in the late 80s, there was a move to ban alcohol as prizes at regimental sports events. Exercise smokers are now a thing of the past, so an effort is being made. Limiting booze at dinner nights is probably out of the question. I think the answer comes down to leadership and example - excessive drinking is not big and not clever and not good for your career.
 
#11
theoriginalphantom said:
its comparing the Army with the 'general population. It doesn't specify if the 'general population' is the equal age range.
Perhaps they mean the Population of General Officers (Generals) in the Army. Now if you try and keep up with them!!
 
#12
Outstanding said:
theoriginalphantom said:
its comparing the Army with the 'general population. It doesn't specify if the 'general population' is the equal age range.
Perhaps they mean the Population of General Officers (Generals) in the Army. Now if you try and keep up with them!!
no way do they have a lower alcohol consumption than the rest of us!
 
#13
Jorrocks said:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/11/03/nbingedrink103.xml

I hope the link works. Today´s Telegraph has an article that highlights the hazardous culture of binge drinking in the armed forces. This is something that has always worried me, but then I´ve thought that it was a problem throughout our modern chav society and the modern armed forces reflects society. However, apparenty 17% of males in the military have a severe drinking problem compared with just 6% in civvy strasse. It goes on to talk about the ambivalent attitude of the chain of command and the institutionalised drinking that sustains this culture. I agree that there is a problem, do you? Any ideas how to change the culture?
They've taken the Bussitil and Gregory case right out of context. In fact, they've failed to provide any link between that incident and the attitude of the management of the Army towards alocohol.

The Army should be as robust on alcohol abuse as it is on drug abuse though.
 
#14
I could give you a case Provost, but to many media on site, but i dont agree, though what is the management of the Army, does it mean whitehall or down to camp level on Operations.

If at Ops level then yes they are to blame or were in the case i knowabout and more than one died through it.
 
#15
Appreciate your point Scarletto. The heavy drinking culture has died down since 'ah wer' a lad. I have to admit that we used to really go for it.

By management, I refer to all. But to be honest, as other posters have pointed out elsewhere, there has been an 'anti-alcohol' campaign in the mob on for a long time now.

Strangely enough though, here's been more deaths caused over the decades in the Army by alcohol, than there have been by drugs. I'd also bet that there are more alcoholics in the Army than Drug Addicts as well. But I'll stand by my opening comment and say that I reckon that we were more prone to a yellow handbag than the lads are today. They're a lot busier for one thing.
 
#16
Young Men and women with spare cash and an element of free time and freedom of action will gravitate towards an ale or two. Always have, suspect they always will. We have all experienced this and would probably all agree that some of the effects are not welcome. It is all about being responsible even when shot away!

Creating an issue out of it will most likely simply cause a storm in a wineglass.
 
#17
Because the advice shown in Benders and Corrie are fantastic.

The Wobbly, (Sorry) drink problem in the Forces is terrible. (hic)
 
#18
theoriginalphantom said:
its comparing the Army with the 'general population. It doesn't specify if the 'general population' is the equal age range. It also talks about
Nine per cent of service women reported severe alcohol problems compared to one per cent of female civilians.

Two thirds of men and half of women in the military also admitted to hazardous drinking, where they consume more than 10 pints a week.
Its down to what people are admitting, not what clinical signs there are of heavy drinking. When questioned plenty of people will lie about their drinking habits, either claiming they can drink more than they actually do, or (especially at pulhheems time) claim far less.

This should be seen like any other survey (as thats all it appears to be) - remember that statistics can prove anything you want them to.

Not too long ago there was a confession that the dangerous drinking levels had been 'made up' by a committee using educated guesswork.
This report is being produced by the Academic Centre for Defence Mental Health at Kings, which produces high quality peer reviewed work on armed forces related topics-

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/projects/acdmh/

It will almost certainly be age standardised against the civilian population.

I believe that they have used this questionnaire-

http://www.testandcalc.com/etc/tests/audit.asp

Complete at your own risk!
 
#19
Provost_Marshal said:
Appreciate your point Scarletto. The heavy drinking culture has died down since 'ah wer' a lad. I have to admit that we used to really go for it.

By management, I refer to all. But to be honest, as other posters have pointed out elsewhere, there has been an 'anti-alcohol' campaign in the mob on for a long time now.

Strangely enough though, here's been more deaths caused over the decades in the Army by alcohol, than there have been by drugs. I'd also bet that there are more alcoholics in the Army than Drug Addicts as well. But I'll stand by my opening comment and say that I reckon that we were more prone to a yellow handbag than the lads are today. They're a lot busier for one thing.
P-M - I think we should explain that a yellow handbag was a colloquiallism for a 10 - pack of Herforder Pils as ooposed to a lifestyle statement. :D

I agree with most of you comments, however when I left (10 years ago) the CoC was really worried about the rise of the drugs culture. Also in any Units I served in turning up p1ssed or making a nuisance of yourself whilst p1ssed was a straight to the Guard Room situation.
 
#20
How many of the general population live and work closely together? Many never see their work colleagues out of hours and only socialise at works christmas do's (and we all know what happens there) imagine if they did that every week. I noticed the reduction in socialising when moving from "front line" stations to those where it was more of a nine to five job, with the personnel spread far and wide over a large area. Yes it is a problem, yes it has always been a problem (from my own experience in the healthfarm in essex, 80% of all inmates were there due to alcohol related crimes) and no doubt it will still be a problem in years to come. I have no real solution but it has to start somewhere and must include all levels of responsibility
 

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