Alanbrooke

#62
Harry Secombe once said "The most brilliant stuff that was ever written for the Goons was when Spike went into hospital for depression. He really wrote brilliant stuff while he was in there!"
Some of the goon shows were written by Larry Stephens and Eric Sykes, when spike was really exceptionally ill, at one point during 6 weeks in dock, it allowed Larry and Eric the freedom to expand their off the wall and totally unheard of at the time, crazy, humour to scale heights that even spike would have been proud of. I still listen in hysterics to the LP's of the shows, and its only beacause of my army service, that I fully appreciate the "in" jokes about the army. 60+ years after the goon shows started on the wireless, his presence is still being felt today. Spike Milligan. RIP
 
#63
Sorry. Not throughout his service but when he put your name in the book.
Ok, misread the quote, in the book, no hesitation, instant, no pauses, this was back in about 84. Every one in that line was in awe of him, and quite rightly so, a comic genius un-paralleled in the history of comedy, on the same level as Groucho, both in thought and intellect. As you can gather, I have been greatly influenced by his writings, and his humour. Edit To Add:- The only man on the planet who can in front of millions on live TV, slag off the Prince of Wales, and get away with it, AND, get a knight hood. Genius.
 
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#64
The general issue post WWI was that inflation during the war applied to just about everything except rent from farmland. Thus suddenly you had a major rise in all your costs and no rise in your income. It happened all over the UK, you will find large houses sold to local councils or just plain knocked down because "His Lordship" was skint. The ones who survived more often had other sources of income.
Starting point, he was the sixth son - primogeniture kicks in, not much left down the line
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#67
So, what the hell could have gone wrong with the family finances? Particularly when we are also informed, ", the family own about half of county Fermanagh."
Death duties
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#68
With regard to famous army names the Navy has some identical ones, big families after all. Napier and Buller were also famous grown up fish heads
 
#70
Currently reading "Triumph In The West" by Arthur Bryant which is basically Alanbrooke's diaries with excerpts from other sources and commentary. It is a fascinating read, in parts extremely humorous and in others very very revealing. Some of the arguments with Churchill must have been monumental and I have just read the part, leading up to Overlord, where Churchill went off the reservation with a proposal for the future conduct of operations in the Far East that was totally at odds with the Chiefs of Staff position. It led to them taking the position that unless it was withdrawn all three would resign. It must of made for interesting time. The other notable thing that comes from the book is the extraordinary hours that he kept. Because of Churchill's habit of working late everyone else had to work around that so normal Chiefs of Staff meetings were usually first thing in the morning, then normal office work or committee meetings and then often Churchill would want a private meeting following dinner that would last until the early hours of the morning. Total exhaustion could never have been far away.
 
#72
The other notable thing that comes from the book is the extraordinary hours that he kept. Because of Churchill's habit of working late everyone else had to work around that so normal Chiefs of Staff meetings were usually first thing in the morning, then normal office work or committee meetings and then often Churchill would want a private meeting following dinner that would last until the early hours of the morning. Total exhaustion could never have been far away.
Surely that's the point of those late mess nights, situational familiarisation.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#73
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ugly

LE
Moderator
#74
regarding death duties: Inheritance Tax in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia
If as its been said he didn't inherit the estate its no surprise he didn't have much left. It also depends upon who the estate was left to, if the estate holder was an elder sibling of the Viscount then the elder siblings children would get first dibs and the Viscount would be given a grace and favour residence on the estate. The one I work on now had the same happen, the current livers in of the big house only got there because the elder sister had no children to leave it to! They still had to buy her out of her lump sum from the estate trust over ten years!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#75
#77
REMEbrat - if your Dad (assumption being made that its your Dad who was in the Army) is an ex apprentice, he might well have met Gen Alanbrooke's son who worked there. Im not sure how far back he went there but at least '87.
correct ,and he was the best instructor in PMC! used to swear like a trooper, let us get our heads down for half an hour if we'd just finished PT (normally 3 mins before we went to his class!) and he actuallyy took some classes to the House of Lords when he popped in a few times a year to get his £300! - by the way although i cant remember what he taught (maths?) everyone in his classes passed because he was a teacher who could generate an environment which made you want to learn and do well
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#78
#79
Now that Victor Alanbrooke has died it is time to correct some of the errors perpetuated in this thread over the past 7 years.

FM Alan Brooke was the ninth and last child, a sixth son, of Sir Victor Brooke who owned Colebrooke in Co Fermanagh. He was brought up in France, French was his first language and he was also fluent in Bearnais, the local dialect. When Sir Victor died the title and estate passed to his eldest son, Douglas, thus there was nothing of substance for Alan to inherit.

In 1945 the FM was created a Baron by Churchill and then a Viscount by Attlee, but although he had been ennobled he was impoverished. He recorded in his diary that it would cost him £200 to become a Baron "which appals me. On retirement his gratuity was £311 (Haig had received £100,000 at the end of WW1), his FM's half pay was "inconsiderable" and unlike Alexander, Slim and Robertson, he was not offered a prestigious public appointment. Consequently Alanbrooke was worried about money. He had to sell his house in Hartley Wintney and move into the gardener's cottage. In addition he also sold his valuable collection of ornithological books.

When Alanbrooke died the title passed to his elder son, Tom, and on his death it passed to his half-brother Victor. Victor lived in the former gardener's cottage but unfortunately invested what money he had in the Lloyds of London insurance market and lost virtually everything when it crashed in the 1990s. He was forced to sell the cottage and moved to a smaller house some miles away. In Debretts he described his recreations as "enjoying post Lloyds poverty and rearranging the wreckage for remaining family".

For many years Victor Alanbrooke was a civilian lecturer in the General Studies Department of Princess Marina College at Arborfield. As can be seen in this thread he was much liked by generations of REME apprentices many of whom kept in contact with him to the end of his life.

Alanbrooke was not the first FM to be financially impoverished and ennobled. When General (later FM) Napier returned triumphally from Abyssinia in 1868 he was made a peer and given an annual pension of £2000. But The Times wrote " it was a mistake to make a hereditary peer of a man whose profession makes it impossible for him to leave his family in a position to support it."
 
#80
Now that Victor Alanbrooke has died it is time to correct some of the errors perpetuated in this thread over the past 7 years.

FM Alan Brooke was the ninth and last child, a sixth son, of Sir Victor Brooke who owned Colebrooke in Co Fermanagh. He was brought up in France, French was his first language and he was also fluent in Bearnais, the local dialect. When Sir Victor died the title and estate passed to his eldest son, Douglas, thus there was nothing of substance for Alan to inherit.

In 1945 the FM was created a Baron by Churchill and then a Viscount by Attlee, but although he had been ennobled he was impoverished. He recorded in his diary that it would cost him £200 to become a Baron "which appals me. On retirement his gratuity was £311 (Haig had received £100,000 at the end of WW1), his FM's half pay was "inconsiderable" and unlike Alexander, Slim and Robertson, he was not offered a prestigious public appointment. Consequently Alanbrooke was worried about money. He had to sell his house in Hartley Wintney and move into the gardener's cottage. In addition he also sold his valuable collection of ornithological books.

When Alanbrooke died the title passed to his elder son, Tom, and on his death it passed to his half-brother Victor. Victor lived in the former gardener's cottage but unfortunately invested what money he had in the Lloyds of London insurance market and lost virtually everything when it crashed in the 1990s. He was forced to sell the cottage and moved to a smaller house some miles away. In Debretts he described his recreations as "enjoying post Lloyds poverty and rearranging the wreckage for remaining family".

For many years Victor Alanbrooke was a civilian lecturer in the General Studies Department of Princess Marina College at Arborfield. As can be seen in this thread he was much liked by generations of REME apprentices many of whom kept in contact with him to the end of his life.

Alanbrooke was not the first FM to be financially impoverished and ennobled. When General (later FM) Napier returned triumphally from Abyssinia in 1868 he was made a peer and given an annual pension of £2000. But The Times wrote " it was a mistake to make a hereditary peer of a man whose profession makes it impossible for him to leave his family in a position to support it."

I understand Victor had a similar position at AAC Chepstow with the Royal Engineers in the 1960s. He spoke fondly of George Crump who looked after their cross country team and regretted the CO would not allow him leave to see the Dedication Service of his father's stained glass window in the RMC at Sandhurst.

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