Al-sweady inquiry.

#4
I will try not to be but my question still stands a investigation of the type will always take a long time and cost money surely its better that we take that cost to clear our good name rather than brush it aside?

Unless you beleive in th inherrent goodness of the British army and feel that any aqusations of this type can be disgraded simply on the reasoning that we are the good guys and wouldnt do this sort of thing?
 
#5
From the BBC site;

The Saville Inquiry into the deaths of 13 people on Bloody Sunday has lasted 12 years and cost £195m, making it the longest and most expensive public inquiry in UK history.

Opinion is split over whether the inquiry has been an essential examination of one of the most infamous events of the Northern Ireland Troubles or a pointless waste of money.

Earlier this year, Northern Ireland Justice Minister David Ford said the inquiry had "enriched lawyers but not necessarily achieved anything for the families".

And what did that achieve?
 
#6
I will try not to be but my question still stands a investigation of the type will always take a long time and cost money surely its better that we take that cost to clear our good name rather than brush it aside?

Unless you beleive in th inherrent goodness of the British army and feel that any aqusations of this type can be disgraded simply on the reasoning that we are the good guys and wouldnt do this sort of thing?
Tried Google Translate but came back as gibberish. Are you missing keys from your keyboard?


Sent from ma hoose.
 
#7
I will try not to be but my question still stands a investigation of the type will always take a long time and cost money surely its better that we take that cost to clear our good name rather than brush it aside?

Unless you beleive in th inherrent goodness of the British army and feel that any aqusations of this type can be disgraded simply on the reasoning that we are the good guys and wouldnt do this sort of thing?
Nine years on,witnesses with agendas,lawyers cashing in..........and to paraphrase what some ex-squaddie was saying this morning "civilians sitting at home now cannot make judgements about what was happening at that time"
 
#8
...Northern Ireland Justice Minister David Ford said the inquiry had "enriched lawyers but not necessarily achieved anything for the families"....
shockingly, you may find that the ministers comments are politically self-serving, and may represent a part of an interpretation of the truth.

i know, take a seat, some deep breaths and you'll be ok in a couple of minutes.

the unpleasent truth for the minister is that, apart from two 'fallout' issues of the Saville Inquiry - that of compensation and criminal prosecutions - the families of those killed on BS are reasonably happy with the results of the inquiry, there is now little cry of 'cover-up' or ' pre-planned masacre', just an understanding that it was the result of a snowballing of malice by a very few, a ****-up by more, and moral cowardice by a much greater number.

you can, imv, have a legitimate discussion about whether the whole thing needed to have cost £100m, but it would be unwise to suggest that it achieved nothing at all - because its not true.
 
#9
I will try not to be but my question still stands a investigation of the type will always take a long time and cost money surely its better that we take that cost to clear our good name rather than brush it aside?

Unless you beleive in th inherrent goodness of the British army and feel that any aqusations of this type can be disgraded simply on the reasoning that we are the good guys and wouldnt do this sort of thing?
Have you got verbal norovirus?
 
#10
Perhaps we could kill two birds with one stone here and expand the scope of the inquiry to look at the behaviour of our political leaders also.
 
#14
well one would have hoped that the RMP would have conducted a thorough investigation at the time.
If I was to take a guess, I would imagine that the RMP met a wall of silence and lack of full cooperation from those units involved. Also a time lag between being informed and arrival at an op base to try to recover forensics and crime scene photos etc.

This would have made it v difficult to get to the real truth. Who would come forward in an infantry unit and say that they witnessed murder or torture by other unit members.

As I said, only my guess, not an informed statement.


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T

Tinman74

Guest
#15
If I was to take a guess, I would imagine that the RMP met a wall of silence and lack of full cooperation from those units involved. Also a time lag between being informed and arrival at an op base to try to recover forensics and crime scene photos etc.

This would have made it v difficult to get to the real truth. Who would come forward in an infantry unit and say that they witnessed murder or torture by other unit members.

As I said, only my guess, not an informed statement.


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Difficult, not impossible. To say that all Infanteers would ignore murder and torture is the mind set and typical stereotype I have come to expect.

If thats the case why has there not been more cases?
 
#16
I am not for 1 minute saying that they have done or covered up what is alleged. I know as much as you do.

I would imagine that if it did happen then a lot of reasonably high ranking people would have a lot to loose.

A young private would be very brave and ready to sacrifice his career in that Bn to be one of the few whistleblowers.

Lets hope the British Army is vindicated and this is not shown to be true.


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#17
Is it not one of those 'police' things that you also weigh up the credibility of your witnesses? Having seen a so called grieving father stand over the body of his newly dead son and say 'you pay me compensation...' I'll repeat my position that you don't throw good money after bad and only a clown would think it justified to spend MILLIONS on this.
It's more for CPS and ultimately the courts to make a decision on the credibility if evidence gathered and those giving it.

If the Police made carte blanche decisions on who they thought were credible or not then that would be open to complaints of bias.

I agree that compensation should only be paid to deserving cases and it should only be a proportionate amount. On the other hand if wrong doing has occurred then the offenders should be suitably punished and recompense paid.


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#18
You are preaching to the converted, the 6 RMP were friends and colleagues of mine and I was in Iraq at that time. I carried a coffin onto a plane at Basra.

As for having faith in CPS then that is a different subject but that is who I have to work with. No choice, as I said compensation should be proportionate. Blame the Government, courts and solicitors for the merry go round of ever increasing payments not the Police or the Army.


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#19
You are preaching to the converted, the 6 RMP were friends and colleagues of mine and I was in Iraq at that time. I carried a coffin onto a plane at Basra.

As for having faith in CPS then that is a different subject but that is who I have to work with. No choice, as I said compensation should be proportionate. Blame the Government, courts and solicitors for the merry go round of ever increasing payments not the Police or the Army.


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Proportionate to whom? If it's proportionate to the victim's likely life earnings then that might make it a bargain for the perpetrator which will remove all deterrent value.
 

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