AK 47

#1
Kalashnikov is now on the BEEB news being presented with an award by the Rooshin President Medyev.
I know the internal mechanism is entirely different from the German Stumgurwer which externally it 'Resembles' and is said to have been the inspiration for the AK 47.
Was the AK really designed by an infantryman on 'Sick Leave' or is there more to the tale ?
john
 
#2
jonwilly said:
Was the AK really designed by an infantryman on 'Sick Leave' or is there more to the tale ?
john
Mikhail Kalashnikov was a tank driver/mechanic and later a senior sergeant (tank commander) serving on the T-34s, not an infantryman.
That's my 10 cents :)
 
#3
The Trigger Mechanism is a copy of John C. Garands Patent.
 
#4
The AK47 magazine lips (a critical part of the design) are identical to those on the German SG 44. Clearly Kalashnikov took elements from a number of older models, but this is very common in firearms design anyway.
 
#5
jonwilly said:
Kalashnikov is now on the BEEB news being presented with an award by the Rooshin President Medyev.
I know the internal mechanism is entirely different from the German Stumgurwer which externally it 'Resembles' and is said to have been the inspiration for the AK 47.
Was the AK really designed by an infantryman on 'Sick Leave' or is there more to the tale ?
john
Didnt this 'give birth' to the SLR also?
 
#6
762baynet said:
jonwilly said:
Kalashnikov is now on the BEEB news being presented with an award by the Rooshin President Medyev.
I know the internal mechanism is entirely different from the German Stumgurwer which externally it 'Resembles' and is said to have been the inspiration for the AK 47.
Was the AK really designed by an infantryman on 'Sick Leave' or is there more to the tale ?
john
Didnt this 'give birth' to the SLR also?
The SG44 passed design features to both the AK47 and (eventually, via SAFN49) SLR. The AK copies the mag and bolt carrier/piston, the FN designs followed up the tilt-locking bolt and hinged receiver.

Arguably, the SG44 also influenced many other modern small arms - e.g the G3 series in terms of metal stamping technology, etc.
 
#7
The German Assault Rifle was kept alive after the second world war by the Spanish company CETME until FN started to design the FAL which owes more to the Russian SVT/SKS gas system and the GermanMP44/AK47 bolt The Fal/SLR was designed by Dieudonne Saive, who had worked with JM Browning in his latter years on the design of the HP35 9mm pistol, it was tried in 7.92mm short but changed to 7.62 for the NATO/US trials in the early 1950s
 
#8
And amazingly, Mikhail Kalashnikov is still alive, in (I think) his early nineties.
 
#11
BIPOLAR77 said:
seen the ak 100 or the an94?

very nice
Can you put up a pic.

I must say I prefer the original AK47 to any later models or varients from other countries. Great bit of kit.
 
#14
The AK101 and derivatives are just 5.56mm NATO versions of the AK74. The commercial SAIGA series of straight-pull rifles are basically made up of 101 family parts.

The AN94 is a new weapon with a complex recoil/reloading system designed to give a two-round burst fire before recoil kicks in. Its so complex and expensive to make that its been binned as a contender for general army issue and is only used by Russian "them" and other forces with generous budgets.
 
#16
it leads me to pose the question was the 101 designed for the polish army?

since they are now part of nato which weapon system will they adopt? one the already know?
 
#17
Some years ago Kalashnikov visited the UK and came to see the small arms collection at Warminster. During his tour, he picked up their Stg(44) and said "Of course, you realise that this is where it all began?". I had this from someone who was there.

AK is not a copy of the Stg by any means, but it is clear that Kalashnikov was inspired by it and probably had samples in hand during his design process.
 
#18
I imagine most weapons developed in the post war years owed quite a bit to the Stg44! The Germans certainly seemed to have made considerable leaps in the technology they developed before and during WW2.
 
#19
Gun_Nut said:
Some years ago Kalashnikov visited the UK and came to see the small arms collection at Warminster. During his tour, he picked up their Stg(44) and said "Of course, you realise that this is where it all began?". I had this from someone who was there.

AK is not a copy of the Stg by any means, but it is clear that Kalashnikov was inspired by it and probably had samples in hand during his design process.
I understand he also visited the Pattern Room in Herbie's time and remarked they had more variations of the AK than he did!
 

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