AJAX - the ‘NOT the CR2 upgrade’ thread

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
One hell of a dust signature.

You get that with dirt bikes in the same terrain, we used to have to mask up when doing motorcross in the desert when I was a lad, but a fair point. You do get the benefit that it would be immune to pressuure triggered IEDs or mines, as well as not leaving tracks to follow. On top of that there's the benefit it can travel across multiple terrains without modification (snow, sand, marsh, water). The main issues would be noise (louder than an electric bike but about the same as a petrol/diesel bike), payload and endurance.

Like I said, not entirely serious, but not entirely flippant either.
 
I think that there are other areas that we could concentrate our expertise in terms of value/income to the UK besides MBTs.
DELETE: besides . .
INSERT: as well as . .

It is not an either/or situation . . . it is suggested, that we should be able to again develop a domestic/UK (English!), armd vehicle capability, without necessarily depriving other areas of R&D.
 
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You get that with dirt bikes in the same terrain, we used to have to mask up when doing motorcross in the desert when I was a lad, but a fair point. You do get the benefit that it would be immune to pressuure triggered IEDs or mines, as well as not leaving tracks to follow. On top of that there's the benefit it can travel across multiple terrains without modification (snow, sand, marsh, water). The main issues would be noise (louder than an electric bike but about the same as a petrol/diesel bike), payload and endurance.

Like I said, not entirely serious, but not entirely flippant either.

I'll send the P.35 docs in and take my consultant few shall I? That did nearly everything that thing does, if not all of it, with far more utility.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
You get that with dirt bikes in the same terrain, we used to have to mask up when doing motorcross in the desert when I was a lad, but a fair point. You do get the benefit that it would be immune to pressuure triggered IEDs or mines, as well as not leaving tracks to follow. On top of that there's the benefit it can travel across multiple terrains without modification (snow, sand, marsh, water). The main issues would be noise (louder than an electric bike but about the same as a petrol/diesel bike), payload and endurance.

Like I said, not entirely serious, but not entirely flippant either.
It's essentially a dirt bike without the wheels - with all the pertinent pluses and minuses. Quick over ground, but you need one per man and some airburst is really going to ruin the day.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It's essentially a dirt bike without the wheels - with all the pertinent pluses and minuses. Quick over ground, but you need one per man and some airburst is really going to ruin the day.

Yeah, the only things I'd add is you can maintain a higher speed over ground than you would on a bike and f*** me it would be fun
 
As for electric panzer, it has been done already, Ferdinand Porsche designed the Elefant in WW2
A pair of 300 ps Maybach petrol engines turning a Dynamo each, in turn powering an electric motor on each rear drive sprocket.
The French built electric drive tanks in WWI, and I'm talking about hundreds of production tanks that saw service, not just engineering prototypes.
St._Chamond.jpg


Pretty much everybody who built tanks at least looked at electric drive if they didn't actually build a few. The reason why they seldom went beyond prototype stages was that they had to be much larger and heavier than tanks that had a conventional gearbox.

Modern power electronics may make them more practical now so we may see them come back eventually.
 
The French built electric drive tanks in WWI, and I'm talking about hundreds of production tanks that saw service, not just engineering prototypes.
St._Chamond.jpg


Pretty much everybody who built tanks at least looked at electric drive if they didn't actually build a few. The reason why they seldom went beyond prototype stages was that they had to be much larger and heavier than tanks that had a conventional gearbox.

Modern power electronics may make them more practical now so we may see them come back eventually.
If I recall correctly, the Porsche version of the Tiger 1, the hulls of which were converted into the Ferdinand/Elefant Panzerjager, also had petro-electric transmission. Fitting the engine and electric drive into the hull - all forward to create space for casemate - caused the engines to be too tightly accommodated, which created major issues with cooling. The tank destroyer performed impressively when it was able to move, but had a pretty appalling record for reliability and the cliche of most being lost to breakdown or abandonment, as opposed to the effect of enemy action, is true in the case of the Elefant.
Edit: the Maus had a petro-electric drive also.
On the plus side, Dr Porsche's liking for (then) faddish design features really helped the Allies.
 
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Poor wording on my part. If we look at a lot of EV proposals, rather than there being one big motor, there are two/four positioned close to where the wheels are. In what's termed 'the wheel corner' rather than in the wheel itself.

I had in mind, given the weight difference between a car and an MBT, a motor could be mounted close to a wheel or group of wheels.

Another factor in terms of component positioning is going to be protection - batteries have a nasty habit of burning fiercely.

Does the UK still build diesel-electric trains? The size of engine and motor units used in the two/three carriage small trains could be appropriate as a starting point. (ETA: Not involving batteries at all, of course).
 
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2 years late on a significantly shorter development timescale doesn't sound so bad....
My understanding is that it Terrier was a very ambitious timeline; something of an opportunity purchase when headroom was found in the equipment programme as other programmes slipped.

Titan and Trojan were very much the last hurrah for Scotswood Road, with design and production processes that hadn’t changed much since the 50s.
 

riksavage

War Hero
Phew....I was worried then!



Hang on......so getting from this-
Side%20view%20Challenger%203%20tank%20DATE%20UNKNOWN%20CREDIT%20RBSL.jpg


to IOC is still going to take 6 years??
That turret is made up of a combination of discarded flat pack furniture and glued together kitchen rolls. It was done to impress the cheque signing finance wonks. I saw the back of it and spotted a Blue Peter badge! Plus, the RBSL project manager was heard complaining the box it came in was missing a screw and Allen key
 
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