AJAX - the ‘NOT the CR2 upgrade’ thread

Some of us are doing what we can to educate and inform on issues like that...

Yes - I would think the RN should have plenty to say about it, having invented the concept and the first working technology as far back as the 1950s...


what strikes me about this is that Link 11/16 was invented to convey higher-level information - tracks on a situation plot - so each ship (and possibly aircraft and some ground callsigns) would have the same Recognised Air (and/or Maritime) Picture on their plot. Each ship makes its own observations with radar, sonar, and looking out of the window, collates them, and shares them with the rest. The whole point is that the processing, essentially the computing, is decentralized, as is the network structure (there has to be one coordinator per network but any node can be leader).

it's very different from sending streaming video, which is effectively raw data.
 
And the "digital" bit is merely the ability to send data back and forth?
I had gained the impression, that the communication abilities, were supposed to be similar the comprehensive capabilities, of the "Fifth Gen" F-35 fighter, with information also going "sideways", with other units/platforms, at the same level . . . not just "up and down" . . . but who the hell is supposed to be (and, at a what level) taking the decisions, I don't know :( .

Edit . . . as subsequently discussed/explained, since my post.
 
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I suppose that there's a lot more space in which to solve integration on a QE than there is on an AFV. Even one the size of AJAX. :-D
But then . . . as I just mentioned (and, probably been refuted in between times ;) ), much the same comms capabilities are accommodated within the F-35 . . . a somewhat smaller platform than AJAX and considerably smaller than QE !!
 
According to Wiki, the British Army was a user of the US Blue Force tracking system. Was it fully integrated into their operations or was it an adhoc solution to improve integration with US forces? Also, is it still in use?
 

Cynical

LE
Book Reviewer
My bug bear was when Staff Officers thought because Bowman was fully secure they could use it like a mobile phone and that transmission length and all the other stuff was yesterday's news!
A habit they had already acquired from SCRA / (Which is easier to spell the Ptarmigan?)

RAC discipline of maximum 15 to 20 second Tx sadly not contagious
 

Cynical

LE
Book Reviewer
each ship (and possibly aircraft and some ground callsigns) would have the same Recognised Air (and/or Maritime) Picture on their plot.
Stating the obvious, the maritime environment has many fewer actors. The Entire Royal navy is what, some 30 to 40 warships pus 40 aircraft.

One armoured battle group is around 200 combat vehicles. If / when the infantry dismounts you can probably double that.

Worse, their lines of sight are obscured, so FM / UHF struggle, so you can end up with an out of date battle picture, which is worse than useless.

Final problem is that there are often non-combatants (who may or may not morph into foes and back).

So things like a Bl;ue Force tracking system may tell you where your side was a few seconds to minutes ago, which may or may not help someone in a command vehicle or post understand what their guys are doing, or at least where they are (and maybe how much CSups they have). However that's not the point - they question is what the enemy is doing...
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
Does the RN have anything similar to the USN’s Cooperative Engagement Capability?

Cooperative Engagement Capability - Wikipedia

Trialled in 2008 where HMS Manchester had a CEC Remote Display (so, able to receive the picture, if not contribute to it) - successful enough that her CO joked about putting an armed sentry in the Ops Room to shoot anyone trying to remove it.

Proposed for the Type 45s, as justification for cutting hulls 7 and 8; "fewer, but more capable ships".

Then the CEC fit was taken as a savings measure. Bah, humbug.


That said, the RN did manage a "forward pass" style engagement in 1982, where Coventry and Broadsword were operating together: Broadsword's Radar 967 picked up an Argentine helicopter, which Coventry's older 992 and 965 sets couldn't see, She put the track across on Link, which provided enough information for Coventry to lock it up with a 909 tracker and successfully engage with Sea Dart despite never holding the target herself.
 
I think CEC has rather gone quiet. Certainly the USN COs I’ve worked with are a bit meh about it.
 
From Defence News on my Google news feed. This is the US Medium Tank program, look what GDLS are trying to flog to the US!
FA7238FE-5013-42AB-8FA3-743C5835BDB1.jpeg
2F61EEA4-7674-4C5C-8DCE-F5CE2FCA4E9A.jpeg
 
Stating the obvious, the maritime environment has many fewer actors. The Entire Royal navy is what, some 30 to 40 warships pus 40 aircraft.

One armoured battle group is around 200 combat vehicles. If / when the infantry dismounts you can probably double that.

Worse, their lines of sight are obscured, so FM / UHF struggle, so you can end up with an out of date battle picture, which is worse than useless.

Final problem is that there are often non-combatants (who may or may not morph into foes and back).

So things like a Bl;ue Force tracking system may tell you where your side was a few seconds to minutes ago, which may or may not help someone in a command vehicle or post understand what their guys are doing, or at least where they are (and maybe how much CSups they have). However that's not the point - they question is what the enemy is doing...
When we had just Bowmanised at 1 Mech we deployed down to WDC with the Step Up HQ with the aim of the exercise to get Bowman SA up and running down to section level. The exercise was going swimmingly and the Brig was very happy and watching his Bde bounce round the plain.

He was just having a brew and shouted me across and enquired 'Which unit is that'? I quickly drilled down and zoomed in to the platform which was a Medic Rover. The Brig seemed happy but then the vehicle sped off and onto the main A road. I thought no dramas but the Brig said do I mind following them which of course I did. 5 minutes later they stopped outside the ale house in West Lavington, I don't know what happened after that as I made an excuse and went outside to laugh!
 
Do like the look of that BAE M8, Composite Rubber Tracks, not too heavy, fairly fast.
One thing I find strange, the big long 105! For a vehicle designed to be air portable, its a big ol’ long gun. I’d have thought a shorter barrelled main gun would have been more practical and a bit of weight saving.
 
Do like the look of that BAE M8, Composite Rubber Tracks, not too heavy, fairly fast.
One thing I find strange, the big long 105! For a vehicle designed to be air portable, its a big ol’ long gun. I’d have thought a shorter barrelled main gun would have been more practical and a bit of weight saving.
The article mentions 2 (or 3) being air portable. I'd imagine that the gun turrets would be turned to face each other, so that the barrels over-hang each other . . . rather than the barrels sticking out of the cockpit, or backwards through the still open stern ramp !! ;) .
 
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