Airlines liable for falling body?

#61
Quite often now, the media reports about these stowaways falling from planes.
Sooner or later someone on the ground will be killed. Already property must have been damaged.
So are the airlines liable?

If the chances of the stowaway being still alive on landing were zero - then the safest thing to do would be for the airplane to lower its wheels whilst over the English Channel (or North Sea) - to allow the body to fall into the sea.

But as there is a tiny chance the stowaway may survive (according to related articles on the BBC site) - that makes the ethics of this more complicated.

Body of 'aeroplane stowaway' found in garden
"If the chances of the stowaway being still alive on landing were zero "

Seems this one survived

Stowaway who survived tragic flight hidden in landing gear now works at Heathrow
 
#62
So ban all flights from Africa then?
SA stowaway found dead at Heathrow

British Airways has confirmed a body was found in the landing gear bay of a Boeing 747 which arrived at Heathrow on a flight from Cape Town. ...
at approximately 20:40, ... an unidentified person was detected scaling the perimeter fence at Cape Town International Airport (CTIA).

The airport immediately responded and as a security patrol officer attempted to apprehend the man he ran in the direction of a British Airways aircraft already in its holding pattern ready for takeoff. The security officer could not approach the aircraft for safety reasons.

A search of the airfield was immediately conducted but the person was not found. Acsa then contacted British Airways, in addition to various other parties. The aircraft proceeded to London. Further sweeps were conducted of the runway and the broader airfield.
 
#63
The U.K. fines lorry drivers who are found with stowaways hiding in their lorry, after going thru the tunnel
(How much per stowaway?)
Security should be tighter for air line companys. .and the responsabilités
I'm not sure what the current level of fine is but it used to be £2k per stowaway.
About 15 years ago a lorry driver friend was arrested in France after he and another driver witnessed people opening his "tilt" and climbing in whilst the vehicle was parked in a rest area, they alerted the authorities before moving off and the police found, I think it was about 21 stowaways in his trailer, he was immediately arrested (the stowaways were released), charged and fined about £10k. On another occasion when he came back from France into Poole, Customs found 2 stowaways tied under his trailer, he was fined £4k for those, thats when he gave up intercontinental driving, he's still driving but now only on UK routes.
 
#65
This has been going on for years. There were two bodies found on a street corner in Hounslow a long time ago and there was a great deal of puzzlement about their origin until someone looked up at an aircraft flying directly overhead as it was coming in to land at Heathrow and put two and two together and made it amount to four.

This latest instance apart, if you researched the issue, you would probably find there have been a lot more since those days. The only way to stop it happening would be at the source where the aircraft originated from and if after all this time, it’s still going on, that’s hardly likely to change now.

Call it a soft option but, I did wonder if one way to try and prevent these deaths and the problem of people doing this in the first place would be to install cameras and lighting into the wheel bays so that the crew can inspect them after take off and check that they are empty.

If after takeoff, you then check the camera’s in the bays and find you do have someone onboard, it’s simply a matter of turning around and returning to your point of origin to disembark the stowaway. It would be a kick in the nuts for the passengers having to put up with the delay and the individual in the wheel bay has still got to make it out of the aircraft alive hanging onto whatever they can as the aircraft lands.

If it was commonly known that this procedure took place in long haul aircraft immediately after takeoff, then perhaps people would give up trying to hitch hike in a situation that is in most instances, guaranteed to end in their early demise from this world.
 
#66
If after takeoff, you then check the camera’s in the bays and find you do have someone onboard, it’s simply a matter of turning around and returning to your point of origin to disembark the stowaway. It would be a kick in the nuts for the passengers having to put up with the delay and the individual in the wheel bay has still got to make it out of the aircraft alive hanging onto whatever they can as the aircraft lands.
Cost of Fuel - landing fees - probable need to dump fuel to land on long haul -

May I suggest a switchable 115V AC supply to the gear bays routed along likely hand and foot holds.
Inspect - open door apply power - wave good bye to ex stowaway - close doors - continue with minimal interference to passengers and crew

If it was commonly known that this procedure took place in long haul aircraft immediately after takeoff, then perhaps people would give up trying to hitch hike in a situation that is in most instances, guaranteed to end in their early demise from this world.
You see were on the same page after all
 
#68
Cost of Fuel - landing fees - probable need to dump fuel to land on long haul -

May I suggest a switchable 115V AC supply to the gear bays routed along likely hand and foot holds.
Inspect - open door apply power - wave good bye to ex stowaway - close doors - continue with minimal interference to passengers and crew



You see were on the same page after all
I did say in my post that my idea was the soft option! :)
 
#69
Mate of mine was on the BA flight out of Cape Town to LHR a while back, and they circled the bay for 2 1/2 hrs dumping fuel before returning due to 'technical issues'.
I was on a Tristar that spent about 90 seconds dumping fuel - Unimpressive Had it not been for the fact it was A) sat in the hanger and b) it was an attempt to defuel** so all 3 pumps were throwing it as fast as they could - oh did I mention the pumps were disconnected but nobody filled in the paper work 100 litres a second across the floor from all 3 Engines


** Yes yes I suppose technically it was still being defueled
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
#71
Well excuse me for not wanting a frozen corpse hitting my house at terminal velocity.
If you are worried about that then move. Also check that new house isn’t on flight path.
However perhaps designers could cure this problem by just making the housing just large enough for the undercarriage to fit and nothing else.

Failing that they could incorporate spikes like the old Iron Maiden so when these fools squeeze in and the under carriage is retracted they are impaled on said spikes and held securely in place so no further mishaps can happen in the future.
Ground crew responsible for checks on plane are then responsible for prising off body from spikes and for safe disposal of said rubbish.
I expect Boeing and Airbus to incorporate this on their next models.
 
#73
If you are worried about that then move. Also check that new house isn’t on flight path.
However perhaps designers could cure this problem by just making the housing just large enough for the undercarriage to fit and nothing else.

Failing that they could incorporate spikes like the old Iron Maiden so when these fools squeeze in and the under carriage is retracted they are impaled on said spikes and held securely in place so no further mishaps can happen in the future.
Ground crew responsible for checks on plane are then responsible for prising off body from spikes and for safe disposal of said rubbish.
I expect Boeing and Airbus to incorporate this on their next models.
Electrify the spikes and he should be medium to well done by the time they land.
 
#78
SA stowaway found dead at Heathrow

British Airways has confirmed a body was found in the landing gear bay of a Boeing 747 which arrived at Heathrow on a flight from Cape Town. ...
at approximately 20:40, ... an unidentified person was detected scaling the perimeter fence at Cape Town International Airport (CTIA).

The airport immediately responded and as a security patrol officer attempted to apprehend the man he ran in the direction of a British Airways aircraft already in its holding pattern ready for takeoff. The security officer could not approach the aircraft for safety reasons.

A search of the airfield was immediately conducted but the person was not found. Acsa then contacted British Airways, in addition to various other parties. The aircraft proceeded to London. Further sweeps were conducted of the runway and the broader airfield.
So ban flights from Africa seems to be growing in statue, especially after other comments on here around drug smuggling etc.
 
#79
If the body was actually frozen, before it fell from the sky, then I doubt it would have time to defrost on the way down.
So when it hits the ground, does it shatter into many pieces (like a glass bottle)?

Then if it defrosts, you'd find all the pieces and wonder at how such a thing occurred.
Absolutely. Then as it warms up all the bits start to combine to reform into a terrifying dusky Terminator that absolutely will not stop until he's sold you a pair of Gucki sunglasses.
 
#80
Apparently Arsenal scouts have descended on the Clapham back garden to see if the Kenyan stowaway is available for next season. A source said: “He’s quick down the wing, comes without baggage and will make a big impact when he arrives.”
Fair enough, but he will have to reconsider his "I just scored a goal celebration", landing face down at 120MPH is really going to mean a short career for him.
 

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