Airlines liable for falling body?

#1
Quite often now, the media reports about these stowaways falling from planes.
Sooner or later someone on the ground will be killed. Already property must have been damaged.
So are the airlines liable?

If the chances of the stowaway being still alive on landing were zero - then the safest thing to do would be for the airplane to lower its wheels whilst over the English Channel (or North Sea) - to allow the body to fall into the sea.

But as there is a tiny chance the stowaway may survive (according to related articles on the BBC site) - that makes the ethics of this more complicated.

Body of 'aeroplane stowaway' found in garden
 
#2
So are the airlines liable?
I doubt it. I'd be more concerned about unauthorised access to parked aircraft than about the possibility of a frozen stowaway landing on someone. If a man can get into the aircraft undetected, then things could be put into the aircraft. Al Shabaab is active in that part of the world. The dead man might have done the world a favour by highlighting the fact that there is a serious problem.
 
#3
Apparently Arsenal scouts have descended on the Clapham back garden to see if the Kenyan stowaway is available for next season. A source said: “He’s quick down the wing, comes without baggage and will make a big impact when he arrives.”
 
#4
I doubt it. I'd be more concerned about unauthorised access to parked aircraft than about the possibility of a frozen stowaway landing on someone. If a man can get into the aircraft undetected, then things could be put into the aircraft. Al Shabaab is active in that part of the world. The dead man might have done the world a favour by highlighting the fact that there is a serious problem.
To be fair, even the MSM have raised the risks of a bomb. Could be attached to the undercarriage - no access to the cabin needed.

Another example of yet more lax security.
 
#5
the safest thing to do would be for the airplane to lower its wheels whilst over the English Channel (or North Sea) - to allow the body to fall into the sea.

Thats absolute genius that is
Transatlantic Flights can Slow to 180 Kts and Drop the Dunlops 150NM off shore.
I cant think of any problems that could possibly be incurred by the subsequent increase in Drag and the need to rag the bollox of the Doncs to cruise just above stalling speed until they get to Heathrow.
 
#6
Thats absolute genius that is
Transatlantic Flights can Slow to 180 Kts and Drop the Dunlops 150NM off shore.
I cant think of any problems that could possibly be incurred by the subsequent increase in Drag and the need to rag the bollox of the Doncs to cruise just above stalling speed until they get to Heathrow.
Why leave the gear down? Flush, clean up, throttle up, press on.

Though the real issue remains if someone can get close enough to the aircraft at any airfield to climb the landing gear and hide in the well space , same peace seeking, law abiding asylum seeker could leave something to spoil your day in the same space and feck off sharpish.
 
#7
Why leave the gear down? Flush, clean up, throttle up, press on.

Though the real issue remains if someone can get close enough to the aircraft at any airfield to climb the landing gear and hide in the well space , same peace seeking, law abiding asylum seeker could leave something to spoil your day in the same space and feck off sharpish.
Decelerate from 500Kts drop dunlops raise dunlops accelerate to 500 Kts - guy behind must now do same in order to maintain separation.
Still beggared up fuel economy
Additional cycles increases wear and risk of failure and cost

You've also just turned UK air space into an M25 of stop start traffic (hopefully without a rear ender)
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
Thats absolute genius that is
Transatlantic Flights can Slow to 180 Kts and Drop the Dunlops 150NM off shore.
I cant think of any problems that could possibly be incurred by the subsequent increase in Drag and the need to rag the bollox of the Doncs to cruise just above stalling speed until they get to Heathrow.
Besides, Somerset deserves to be bombed.
 
#9
Decelerate from 500Kts drop dunlops raise dunlops accelerate to 500 Kts - guy behind must now do same in order to maintain separation.
Still beggared up fuel economy
Additional cycles increases wear and risk of failure and cost

You've also just turned UK air space into an M25 of stop start traffic (hopefully without a rear ender)
We really, really need a tongue-in-cheek button/emoji.

The real issue remains, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, access to the a/c particularly when taxiing to and holding for the runway.
 
#10
Decelerate from 500Kts drop dunlops raise dunlops accelerate to 500 Kts - guy behind must now do same in order to maintain separation.
Still beggared up fuel economy
Additional cycles increases wear and risk of failure and cost

You've also just turned UK air space into an M25 of stop start traffic (hopefully without a rear ender)
Ok. So in plain English, you're saying it would increase fuel costs and cause delays?
 
#13
Ok. So in plain English, you're saying it would increase fuel costs and cause delays?
I think what's he's saying is that you are a gormless tw*t....
 
#18
OP; don't forget, after the casts have been cut off and you have filed for compo, that poor git you interrupted having a handy in his garden will want his path mended.
 
#20
If the body was actually frozen, before it fell from the sky, then I doubt it would have time to defrost on the way down.
So when it hits the ground, does it shatter into many pieces (like a glass bottle)?

Then if it defrosts, you'd find all the pieces and wonder at how such a thing occurred.
 
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