Airliner take-off's in high winds

#1
Got a flight to the US tomorrow from Manchester at 09:30, just as the strong winds arrive.
I am resigned to the fact I may be delayed, but am just trying to find out as to what kinds of wind levels would delay a plane?
We are supposed to have the same winds here in Lancashire today, but they don't seem to be too bad and Google is just a mine of conflicting info regarding this.
Any advice to help me plan the day would be much appreciated.
 
#2
Depends on the crosswind. If it's down the runway then no issue.
Airports are generally oriented in line with the local wind direction.
 
#3
Depends on the crosswind. If it's down the runway then no issue.
Airports are generally oriented in line with the local wind direction.
Poop. It's a southerly on an east/west runway.
I shall be camping out in a bar I think.
 
#4
Poop. It's a southerly on an east/west runway.
I shall be camping out in a bar I think.
The airline company will have set crosswind limitations for each aircraft type in its fleet. You and you just be chillin Brah, notin you and you can be doin.
 
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#5
Any advice to help me plan the day would be much appreciated.
Take a paperback per person flying and be thankful you won't have to fill in 20 NoK cards as per RAF SOP for 'the planes not ready what can we do to keep the TA quiet for another hour or two'.
 
#6
Got a flight to the US tomorrow from Manchester at 09:30, just as the strong winds arrive.
I am resigned to the fact I may be delayed, but am just trying to find out as to what kinds of wind levels would delay a plane?
We are supposed to have the same winds here in Lancashire today, but they don't seem to be too bad and Google is just a mine of conflicting info regarding this.
Any advice to help me plan the day would be much appreciated.
Any idea of what type of aircraft you’ll be on?
 
#9
You have to remember that aeroplanes are not designed to work in fast moving air streams. Modern design and wing technology does now allow for over wing air speeds well into double figures but a cross wind of more than 4-5 mph could well see you spending you holiday in sunny Moss Side.
 
#10
Crosswind velocity of +30 knots should be acceptable on modern jet aircraft. Just be thankful you are flying out of Manchester and not Leeds Bradford.
ETA:
From PPrune
B757/B767

Take off;
Dry 40kt
Wet 25kt
Standing water/slush 15kt
Snow, no melting 20kt
Ice, no melting 15kt
Slippery 10kt

Land;
Dry 40kt
Wet 40kt
Standing water/slush 20kt
Snow, no melting 35kt
Ice, no melting 17kt
Slippery 10kt
 
#15
Must be UA then. Not many airlines fly the a single aisle across the pond.
Yup, the only one that did the connections I needed.
And was cheap!
 
#16
The 757 sure does have a pretty cool takeoff, zooms straight up compared to some of the ac out there.
Oh aye. The 757 is my favourite narrow body aircraft. The takeoffs were belting and the roar of the RR211's is spectacular. I don't know if United have stripped some seats out to provide more leg room but I found it pretty cramped when I flew with Jet2.
 
#19
Manchester airport weather now shows the wind arriving about 10am now, I may just get away with it :)
 
#20
The airline company will have set crossword limitations for each aircraft type in its fleet. You and you just be chillin Brah, notin you and you can be doin.
Crossword limits - what is a bloke going to do to pass the time. Charades are an option I suppose but perhaps if the crosswords are limited then you'd better smuggle a couple of these through security instead...


 

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