Airfield runway has just been bombed.

The runway has been damaged, aircraft out on a mission and others want to deploy.

In the past a nightmare scenario for those who will be trying to repair it, but recent advances can cut that time down greatly. The latest iteration of the system is Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Matting used in conjunction with crushed stone as a foreign object debris cover (FOD) for rapid repair of damaged airfield pavements.

In recent trials with the Israelis this was the first time FRP kits had been used in such a large crater configuration, and the first time the kits were tested using the latest F-35 fighters. FRP is the future of 'expedient' runway repair and agile combat support.



 
The runway has been damaged, aircraft out on a mission and others want to deploy.

In the past a nightmare scenario for those who will be trying to repair it, but recent advances can cut that time down greatly. The latest iteration of the system is Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Matting used in conjunction with crushed stone as a foreign object debris cover (FOD) for rapid repair of damaged airfield pavements.

In recent trials with the Israelis this was the first time FRP kits had been used in such a large crater configuration, and the first time the kits were tested using the latest F-35 fighters. FRP is the future of 'expedient' runway repair and agile combat support.



From the link:
"The speed of FRP kit installation is key. For example, an experienced team can interlock the panels, install the anchors and prepare the surface for aircraft traffic in less than two hours"
I'm sure the RE in Germany was faster than that. Any engineers care to comment?
 
From the link:
"The speed of FRP kit installation is key. For example, an experienced team can interlock the panels, install the anchors and prepare the surface for aircraft traffic in less than two hours"
I'm sure the RE in Germany was faster than that. Any engineers care to comment?
Big G is laughing.. Chuck all the empty lager cans in the hole, quick dry cement, a fat POM and planes can fly inside 20 minutes.

(I'm drinking with him in his man cave. I'm glad I don't have work tomorrow)
 

CC_TA

LE
The runway has been damaged, aircraft out on a mission and others want to deploy.

In the past a nightmare scenario for those who will be trying to repair it, but recent advances can cut that time down greatly. The latest iteration of the system is Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Matting used in conjunction with crushed stone as a foreign object debris cover (FOD) for rapid repair of damaged airfield pavements.

In recent trials with the Israelis this was the first time FRP kits had been used in such a large crater configuration, and the first time the kits were tested using the latest F-35 fighters. FRP is the future of 'expedient' runway repair and agile combat support.



Why not just close the autobahn, grab a yellow handbag and wait it out?
 

Q_Man

Old-Salt
I did 7 years in two posts at 39 Engr Regt (Air Sp), 2 years in the Falklands responsible for runway repair and 2 1/2 years in 529 STRE (Air Sp). I have trained, and carried out, runway design, repair and reverse engineering to see what could land / take off and how many. 2 hours seems long, but it depends on the longevity of the repair.

AM2 matting or PSP would be quicker and the method of choice, but again it depends on the size of crater, amount of work to cut back to good and heave to be removed. Even the same sized ordinance dropped from the same height on the same trajectory would have different impacts and resulting craters.

I did attend a week long conference at a USAF base in Florida that demonstrated a number of new methods of repair, none of which we recommended the UK invest in. Same amount of work and time required for the same result, why change what the guys know?

We also trialled rapid set concrete capping in the late 90s but again reverted to the Cold War metal capped fill as a short term and concrete / blacktop repair when time permitted.
 
Why not just close the autobahn, grab a yellow handbag and wait it out?
This yellow handbag?
1629050733012.png


Last seen in the Gaddafi Paderborn 3 years ago.
 
I did attend a week long conference at a USAF base in Florida that demonstrated a number of new methods of repair, none of which we recommended the UK invest in. Same amount of work and time required for the same result, why change what the guys know?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

The method that is.
 
From the link:
"The speed of FRP kit installation is key. For example, an experienced team can interlock the panels, install the anchors and prepare the surface for aircraft traffic in less than two hours"
I'm sure the RE in Germany was faster than that. Any engineers care to comment?
A few loads of hardcore, tampered, top finish, 'JOB DONE', time for NAAFI Break. (All done whilst under enemy fire, OK it was a exercise and blanks were being used).

Ditto for repairing damaged railway tracks. (My field).

Good Lads the Sappers proud to have been attached/worked with them.
 
Big G comment.

Conscript pikeys.
They'll lay a runway faster and cheaper than any Engineer regiment. With the added bonus of behind able to tell the RSM and CO to feck off.
 
I did attend a week long conference at a USAF base in Florida that demonstrated a number of new methods of repair, none of which we recommended the UK invest in. Same amount of work and time required for the same result, why change what the guys know?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

The method that is.

Repackage, and re-sell for more money.

I did know a civil servant engineer type who was doing R&D into rapid setting concrete for runway repair. Basically bulldoze the blast rubble back into the holes, make level, then add some hugely, huge, BFO bags of qwikset concrete, sprinkle with water and add jets a couple of hours later. Clever stuff, but the chemistry was beyond me.
 
I did 7 years in two posts at 39 Engr Regt (Air Sp), 2 years in the Falklands responsible for runway repair and 2 1/2 years in 529 STRE (Air Sp). I have trained, and carried out, runway design, repair and reverse engineering to see what could land / take off and how many. 2 hours seems long, but it depends on the longevity of the repair.

AM2 matting or PSP would be quicker and the method of choice, but again it depends on the size of crater, amount of work to cut back to good and heave to be removed. Even the same sized ordinance dropped from the same height on the same trajectory would have different impacts and resulting craters.

I did attend a week long conference at a USAF base in Florida that demonstrated a number of new methods of repair, none of which we recommended the UK invest in. Same amount of work and time required for the same result, why change what the guys know?

We also trialled rapid set concrete capping in the late 90s but again reverted to the Cold War metal capped fill as a short term and concrete / blacktop repair when time permitted.

Why didn’t the RAF develop their own troops to repair airfields.

It’s not like we ever used them to guard our NAAFIs.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
A couple of photos of repairs to the pan at KIA - twenty years ago (roughly)
1629052907114.jpeg


1629052925239.jpeg
 
Big G comment.

Conscript pikeys.
They'll lay a runway faster and cheaper than any Engineer regiment. With the added bonus of behind able to tell the RSM and CO to feck off.
But their gash job will break the next day necessitating a more involved and expensive repair.
 
From the link:
"The speed of FRP kit installation is key. For example, an experienced team can interlock the panels, install the anchors and prepare the surface for aircraft traffic in less than two hours"
I'm sure the RE in Germany was faster than that. Any engineers care to comment?
39 (Airfields) Regiment at Waterbeach specialised in doing this fifty years ago, using Class 60 Trackway.
For smaller holes (typically cannon fire) there were options to fill with a quick drying two part epoxy resin mix.
 
Quick dit, RAF Binbrook closed in 1988, at least that's when the Lightnings left. It was used for a short while as an RLG for Scampton. Towards the end of this time an RE Sqn had the opportunity to practice their rapid repair skills. This involved digging a hole in the runway or taxiway, can't remember which, placing a charge in it and setting it off to simulate a hit with a 1000lb. Then followed the repair. So there's the RE blowing up things and then repairing them. Pigs, sh1t, happy come to mind.
 
39 (Airfields) Regiment at Waterbeach specialised in doing this fifty years ago, using Class 60 Trackway.
For smaller holes (typically cannon fire) there were options to fill with a quick drying two part epoxy resin mix.

No idea what trackway is, but in RAFG there were BFO rolls of matting and hardcore (fnarr fnarr) a short distance from the runways, RE for the use of.
 

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