Airbus -v- Boeing II: Farnbrough Week

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
I'm not sure why EADS are demanding "that the UK government allow it to compete against BAE for a greater share of UK defence and aerospace contracts." The govt should allow them to bid for as much business as the British defence industry wins in France.
 
#3
I used to work for EADS, it sells itself as an Anglo-Franco-German-Spanish venture but all senior management that are not French are French sycophants!! And the only reason that they have workers in the UK now is due to the large contracts that they have with the MoD!! EADS (mainly due to poor management, stiff competition from Boeing and overdue projects) are in trouble despite £1.6bn profit last year and they are threatening UK jobs in an attempt to threaten the UK Govt (See:pushover) into offering them an olive branch!!

Just goes to show that the UK Defence industry is recognised as a cash cow to large corporations!
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
It's also not like they're being deliberately excluded. Anyone can bid and, in theory, win. The problem is they're so used to the French method of contract awards they think its a conspiracy against them.

And the UK defence industry is THE game to play if you're a defence company. Its the one place where there really is an equal chance of winning. Well worth the effort if your own domestic market's weak.
 
#5
Couldn't find the previous thread so started a new one. Anyway, lots of orders likely to be announced over the next week, but the outlook for the UK Airbus workers looking a bit cloudy - here's a sysnopsis:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/5185036.stm
good link . The video report to the right was interesting. The on camera reporter did try and explain the various market assumption of each company ,noted that the UK had the second largest aircraft industry . The reporter interviewed some official that mention that a tax of 37 quid was going to be placed on low cost air carriers( Boeing's market) to encourage people to use a larger Airplane. What !

Did I hear that correctly ?
 
#7
http://www.richardaboulafia.com/shownote.asp?id=223


This is the newsletter from Richard Aboulafia of the Teal Group . He was very hard on Airbuses decision to build the A380 but he seems hard on others as well

1. ITAR. Despite a century-long alliance and ongoing joint operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, the UK is somehow deemed untrustworthy, nearly de-railing JSF, the most important arms agreement in decades. Perhaps the State Department and other US agencies associate the RAF with Group Captain Lionel Mandrake, the liaison officer in Doctor Strangelove who didn’t help General Jack D. Ripper nuke Russia
4. Anti-Airbus jihads. The last two years saw two John Mica anti-Airbus proposals. If I recall correctly they mandated the spray painting of US-based Airbus jets with “Don’t fly—fureign plane.” The latest Mica proposal halting federal funds for A380-related airport upgrades actually makes some sense. But it’s probably too tainted by Mica’s earlier protectionist efforts to go ahead.
.


meanwhile He has good advice for both AirBus an Boeing

Previous Airbus airframes have been heavily in-sourced. Airbus might find that outsourcing and offshoring (not always the same thing) now make a lot of sense. It cuts production costs, helping the business case for the new EADS investors. It moves companies to the top of the food chain, improving return on invested capital. It would help access risk sharing cash (that’s why Italy should be Airbus’s real target, and why China is a dry well) and new manufacturing techniques. Most importantly, it gets program risk off your books, helping to calm jittery new EADS investors, getting them behind the A370.
In the interests of fairness, here’s some free (and obvious) advice to Boeing: as soon as the 787 is out the door, launch the 797 narrowbody. Do to the A320 what the 777 and 787 are doing to the A330/340.
 
#8
Bouillabaisse said:
It's also not like they're being deliberately excluded. Anyone can bid and, in theory, win. The problem is they're so used to the French method of contract awards they think its a conspiracy against them.

And the UK defence industry is THE game to play if you're a defence company. Its the one place where there really is an equal chance of winning. Well worth the effort if your own domestic market's weak.
Sorry mate, utter bollox, i know of one defence agency that consistently put in bids that were more beneficial to the MoD than those of their competitors, yet still BAeS won the contracts, and then subcontracted that work to the loser. So basically the MoD paid out more than they would have, for the same work but with the pencil dicks at BAeS getting a nice big payout for doing fu&k all.
Am I bitter? yes i f*cking well am. :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:
Rant Out
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
I'm not saying defence procurement is perfect but my point is that EADS shouldn't be trying to trade jobs for contracts in this way with MOD. What do you want? The best bit of kit the MOD can afford for what little money it has or the EADS kit whether its any good or not so that BAE workers keep their jobs?
 
#12
I have just watched the Airbus display at Farnborough of the A340 and A380.
I have to say I'm very impressed by the A380, seems to be a very agile (for its size) aircraft and it wouldn't suprise me to see a military version roll off due to the nature of the underbody!

I hope it works for them!

OS
 
#13
Emirates Airlines Says It Is Looking at Both Revamped Airbus 350XWB and the Boeing Dreamliner

They also have 43 A380 on order who are these Guys The whole population of the UAE must leave every other day than come back home.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_A380

To get a sense of Emirates' buying power, the company's decision to order 42 Boeing 777 jets last November was Boeing's largest single order for the 777. Emirates is scheduled to get one 777 delivered every month for the next five years. At list prices, the deal would be worth up to $9.7 billion (euro7.8 billion).
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/060718/britain_air_show_emirates.html?.v=1
 
#14
"Angus Robertson said: "Clearly there have been issues with the project procurement and development, however they do not diminish the strategic requirement for Nimrod or the fact that RAF Kinloss and its personnel are best placed to receive the new aircraft." "

The strategic requirement to keep at least one job in Kinloss - i.e. the local MP's
 
#17
Cheers Andy, i do wonder sometimes how many personnel in posts within the procurement side of things are looking toward their golden handshake from the MoD, and a walk in job with wasteofspace. I feel sorry for John Smith the MP for the vale of glamorgan who has fought hard to retain jobs there, with absolutely no support from other local Liarbour muppets. Maggie might have screwed the miners but this lot are doing it to everyone else in south trogland, just a conspiracy theory but i think Adam Ingram is scottish!
 
#18
Cuddles said:
"Angus Robertson said: "Clearly there have been issues with the project procurement and development, however they do not diminish the strategic requirement for Nimrod or the fact that RAF Kinloss and its personnel are best placed to receive the new aircraft." "

The strategic requirement to keep at least one job in Kinloss - i.e. the local MP's
Oohh, you cynic!

Litotes
 
#19
There I was, a heat-stricken recovering anglophile. Who told Britain they were a serious aviation player? UK aviation has had 100 years of quaint obsolescence and gifted amateurism, producing value destroyers like the Avro 146, a six or eight engine jet comfortably seating 100 hobbits in 3-3 configuration (that was Britain’s final civil jet, last delivered in 2003). The RAF just retired the last Canberra recon plane which I believe was coal-powered. Watching the Nimrod fly past produces knowing chuckles between people familiar with its cash-devouring history. And there, parked off in the distance is the crowning achievement: a Concorde. Mach 2, taxpayers zero, to steal someone else’s joke.

I’m neglecting BAE’s Hawk trainer, still alive after 30 improbable years, and a few curiosities like the twice-a-year Islander line. And I understand the emotional pride that goes with national aircraft. Arguably all of Britain’s aviation horrors of the last century are justified by the almighty Spitfire and Hurricane, which basically saved liberal democracy and Western Civilization. And watching US-invented V-22s fly past Big Ben felt like watching a cheesy sci-fi film about an alternative Britain, conquered by a barbaric but technologically advanced alien race.
http://www.richardaboulafia.com/shownote.asp?id=224








Read the whole article he is positive about British aviation and AirBus
 

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