Airbus Announces Termination of A380 Production

I flew back from my scenery and cuisine holiday with Emirates yesterday. BKK-DXB in a 777-300ER and DXB-BHX in an A380.

What a difference. The 777 rattled, banged and roared down the runway before lurching into the air. The A380 just hummed a little more loudly and lifted off smoothly.

I have a pair of Bose Quiet Comfort headphones that I wear when flying. With them on I could just hear the 777 engines faintly in the background. The A380 was completely silent.
 
I flew back from my scenery and cuisine holiday with Emirates yesterday. BKK-DXB in a 777-300ER and DXB-BHX in an A380.

What a difference. The 777 rattled, banged and roared down the runway before lurching into the air. The A380 just hummed a little more loudly and lifted off smoothly.

I have a pair of Bose Quiet Comfort headphones that I wear when flying. With them on I could just hear the 777 engines faintly in the background. The A380 was completely silent.
The A380 - even (relatively) old ones - are so much more quieter compared to the to the 777. There's no question about that, and I have been on a few to know the difference.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Agreed.

I'm not pro-BREXIT but the writing's been on the wall for A380 for some time.

Regards,
MM
I didn't say it was Brexit @widow11 pay attention,Governments even unelected ones dont spend their money they spend ours.
A quick shufti at your points shows dumb for what it is!
 
I didn't say it was Brexit @widow11 pay attention,Governments even unelected ones dont spend their money they spend ours.
A quick shufti at your points shows dumb for what it is!
Did you mean to quote me @ugly?

Regards,
MM
 
The Airbus A380 one of Europe’s great prestige project, and another technological marvel, like Concorde, has bitten the dust. Orders for the giant passenger jet gone, not just new ones, but existing orders. The last customer Emirates cancelling its remaining request.

Sadly nobody wants the A380 any more, even at a discount. Two used models now beeing parted out instead of sold on the used market, the parts worth more than the whole. Boeing had cautioned Airbus when plans for a joint designed and built massive aircraft were cancelled, but the Europeans decided to build one anyway.

Development costs for the A380 were estimated at around €15 billion! Almost a third financed by government loans from Germany, France and Spain. Government loans to be repaid from the sale of aircraft. Government loans that now will no longer be repaid. The amount that will have to written off unclear, but Airbus still owes the German government about €759 million.

The A380 mess does contain lessons. A380 flights were uneconomical because Insurance companies weren’t willing to insure an A380 flight at a reasonable premium because the concentration of risk was too high. Some also claim hub and spoke model is not getting any larger, and smaller more economical twins are taking people direct to desired destinations instead of to transit hubs where the huge capacity made sense.

No 380 was ever sold to the US. With A380 production gone, Airbus now faces more than 3,000 job losses, and respective governments face huge debt write-offs. It was a gamble which unfortunately seems not to have paid off.
 
The Airbus A380 one of Europe’s great prestige project, and another technological marvel, like Concorde, has bitten the dust. Orders for the giant passenger jet gone, not just new ones, but existing orders. The last customer Emirates cancelling its remaining request.

Sadly nobody wants the A380 any more, even at a discount. Two used models now beeing parted out instead of sold on the used market, the parts worth more than the whole. Boeing had cautioned Airbus when plans for a joint designed and built massive aircraft were cancelled, but the Europeans decided to build one anyway.

Development costs for the A380 were estimated at around €15 billion! Almost a third financed by government loans from Germany, France and Spain. Government loans to be repaid from the sale of aircraft. Government loans that now will no longer be repaid. The amount that will have to written off unclear, but Airbus still owes the German government about €759 million.

The A380 mess does contain lessons. A380 flights were uneconomical because Insurance companies weren’t willing to insure an A380 flight at a reasonable premium because the concentration of risk was too high. Some also claim hub and spoke model is not getting any larger, and smaller more economical twins are taking people direct to desired destinations instead of to transit hubs where the huge capacity made sense.

No 380 was ever sold to the US. With A380 production gone, Airbus now faces more than 3,000 job losses, and respective governments face huge debt write-offs. It was a gamble which unfortunately seems not to have paid off.
Accurate assessment, but many of the jobs that you mention that will be lost in the manufacturing supply chain can be saved by taking up the slack as the production rate for the A320 family increases over the next few years.

The project didn't lack for ambition and for that alone we should remember it fondly.
 
If HUB airports are falling out of favour as most of us prefer to fly direct from regional airports and the airlines have cottoned on to this does this mean that the third runway at Heathrow will be binned or is it still a government vanity project ?.
 
If HUB airports are falling out of favour as most of us prefer to fly direct from regional airports and the airlines have cottoned on to this does this mean that the third runway at Heathrow will be binned or is it still a government vanity project ?.

If hub airports are falling out of favour when will I be able to board a 787 at Birmingham (UK) and disembark at Bangkok? I suspect the answer is 'never' so I'll just have to carry on flying the A380 out to DXB thence onwards to BKK.
 
The Airbus A380 one of Europe’s great prestige project, and another technological marvel, like Concorde, has bitten the dust. Orders for the giant passenger jet gone, not just new ones, but existing orders. The last customer Emirates cancelling its remaining request.

Sadly nobody wants the A380 any more, even at a discount. Two used models now beeing parted out instead of sold on the used market, the parts worth more than the whole. Boeing had cautioned Airbus when plans for a joint designed and built massive aircraft were cancelled, but the Europeans decided to build one anyway.

Development costs for the A380 were estimated at around €15 billion! Almost a third financed by government loans from Germany, France and Spain. Government loans to be repaid from the sale of aircraft. Government loans that now will no longer be repaid. The amount that will have to written off unclear, but Airbus still owes the German government about €759 million.

The A380 mess does contain lessons. A380 flights were uneconomical because Insurance companies weren’t willing to insure an A380 flight at a reasonable premium because the concentration of risk was too high. Some also claim hub and spoke model is not getting any larger, and smaller more economical twins are taking people direct to desired destinations instead of to transit hubs where the huge capacity made sense.

No 380 was ever sold to the US. With A380 production gone, Airbus now faces more than 3,000 job losses, and respective governments face huge debt write-offs. It was a gamble which unfortunately seems not to have paid off.
I bet those government loans will be written-off, and Airbus job losses will fall disproportionally in the UK.
 
If hub airports are falling out of favour when will I be able to board a 787 at Birmingham (UK) and disembark at Bangkok? I suspect the answer is 'never' so I'll just have to carry on flying the A380 out to DXB thence onwards to BKK.
You can fly on Thompson Airways from BHX to U-Tapao (in Rayong province south east of Bangkok) in Thailand, as well as from LGW (Gatwick) and MAN to UTP (U-Tapao). Winter season charters, time will tell whether Thompson run the flights next year.
 
You can fly on Thompson Airways from BHX to U-Tapao (in Rayong province south east of Bangkok) in Thailand, as well as from LGW (Gatwick) and MAN to UTP (U-Tapao). Winter season charters, time will tell whether Thompson run the flights next year.

A bit inconvenient as I need to travel on to Chiang Mai from BKK.
 
If HUB airports are falling out of favour as most of us prefer to fly direct from regional airports and the airlines have cottoned on to this does this mean that the third runway at Heathrow will be binned or is it still a government vanity project ?.
It's all gone very quiet on that front...
 
Accurate assessment, but many of the jobs that you mention that will be lost in the manufacturing supply chain can be saved by taking up the slack as the production rate for the A320 family increases over the next few years.

The project didn't lack for ambition and for that alone we should remember it fondly.
With the first A320 put into operation in 1988, 20+ years after the first 737 was delivered the 320 is certainly a best seller for Airbus. The 8,000th of the A320 family A318, A319 A320 and A321 was in Feb 2018. The A320 Neo coming off the production lines in Tianjin and delivered to Air China. At end-February 2018, a total of 8,029 aircraft had been delivered.

It was, like Concord an ambitious project, and, produced a fine aircraft. But as we have seen before, and will see again, they have to satisfy prevailing market conditions.
 
With the first A320 put into operation in 1988, 20+ years after the first 737 was delivered the 320 is certainly a best seller for Airbus. The 8,000th of the A320 family A318, A319 A320 and A321 was in Feb 2018. The A320 Neo coming off the production lines in Tianjin and delivered to Air China. At end-February 2018, a total of 8,029 aircraft had been delivered.

It was, like Concord an ambitious project, and, produced a fine aircraft. But as we have seen before, and will see again, they have to satisfy prevailing market conditions.
Will this be start of a trend of accelerated retirement of the A380?

Lufthansa to almost halve A380 fleet – Business Traveller

Between 2022 and 2023 Germany’s national airline will reduce its A380 fleet from 14 to eight aircraft.

It means six A380s will be sold to Airbus during the previously named period for what Lufthansa says is “economic reasons.”

Lufthansa will in future concentrate on operating long-haul flights with twin-engined aircraft.







News
Lufthansa to almost halve A380 fleet
13 Mar 2019 by Alex McWhirter


Germany’s Lufthansa is following in the footsteps of Air France.
Between 2022 and 2023 Germany’s national airline will reduce its A380 fleet from 14 to eight aircraft.
It means six A380s will be sold to Airbus during the previously named period for what Lufthansa says is “economic reasons.”
Lufthansa will in future concentrate on operating long-haul flights with twin-engined aircraft.
Besides an existing order of B777-9s which will enter the fleet in 2020, Lufthansa today said it would order no fewer than 20 B787-9s and 20 Airbus A350-900s.
The cost of the investment at list prices is US$12 billion.
Lufthansa says that “as is usual with such orders, Lufthansa Group has negotiated a significant price reduction. The parties have agreed not to disclose the actual purchase price.”
Although Lufthansa’s A380s will continue in service for a number of years they will eventually have to be retired.
And in any case Airbus stated recently that its A380 production line will close in 2021.
Speaking yesterday [Thursday] Carsten Spohr, Chairman of Lufthansa’s Executive Board, said:
“Two more A380s will be moved [from their current Frankfurt base] to Munich in summer 2020.”
“The decision as to where our eight [remaining] A380s will be based from 2023 onwards has not yet been made. We’ll take that decision roughly one year in advance.”
Qatar Airways has also said that its A380s will be retired in 2024 after ten years of service.
 
It's all gone very quiet on that front...
The new runway was binned last time out because of airport-related air pollution caused by ground, not air, traffic - the area around Heathrow is already on or exceeding legal limits. That part of the M25 is already hellish and the increase in traffic caused by a new runway would only compound matters.

A lot of hopeful noise was made about how much leaner cars have become since the last time that the runway was booked that. Then VW hit problems with emissions in the US.

The reality is that it's been known for years that cars aren't as clean as claimed.

We have though the DVLA a database of vehicles in the UK - make, models, emissions classes. We have through the MOT system the mileages. The figures haven't added up for years, it's just been too hot a political potato to come out and say something.

The reality is that - no pun intended - given where we are at the moment a third runway at Heathrow should never get off the ground. I know that the air traffic control people also say that it has to be Heathrow but Gatwick is the far better option environmentally.
 

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