Airbus Announces Termination of A380 Production

Gulfstream or Challengers can give you long haul comfort for VIPs.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
We have a dedicated VIP role-fit which can be fitted to a Voyager in about 12 hours. This has 'business class' seating for ministers and a VVIP en-suite bedroom.

We also have Ro-Ro VIP compartments for the C-17 or C-130J, as the USAF does.

Frankly, a small fleet of VIP configured business jets to replace our BAe146s would be of more use to a dedicated long-haul VVIP jet in my view.

Regards,
MM
With something G 4/5/550 size you also have the option of conversion to an aeromedical fit for CCAST missions without having to use a C17/Voyager etc.
 
With something G 4/5/550 size you also have the option of conversion to an aeromedical fit for CCAST missions without having to use a C17/Voyager etc.
Agreed.

Sadly, we don’t have the money.

Regards,
MM
 
We have a dedicated VIP role-fit which can be fitted to a Voyager in about 12 hours. This has 'business class' seating for ministers and a VVIP en-suite bedroom.

We also have Ro-Ro VIP compartments for the C-17 or C-130J, as the USAF does.

Frankly, a small fleet of VIP configured business jets to replace our BAe146s would be of more use to a dedicated long-haul VVIP jet in my view.

Regards,
MM

Times have changed! I remember coming back from Aldergrove after an emergency tour to be flown back in a C130. On boarding the plane there was a bit of a WTF moment on seeing four cattle-class type (civvy for the use of) seats bolted to the floor facing backwards at the front of the fuselage. Eighty odd knackered smelly paratroopers boarded the plane, and then a man, his wife, and two children were led up the forward port-side door into the comparative luxury of their crappy seats.

The worst thing for the 'VIPs' was that their view of the fuselage (looking backwards) was of a load of tired gungy reprobates scowling at them. I did feel sorry for them until we got the horror-boxes (replete with a warm carton of Orangina) and they got hot meals (to put on the fold-out trays in their armrests).
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Agreed.

Sadly, we don’t have the money.

Regards,
MM
What would be the cost saving if you didn't have to mobilise a C17/Voyager etc for a single patient or go to the civil air ambulance market for permissive area aero-meds. Cost to Canary Islands for an air ambulance is approx £25k to places like Niarobi £70 to 80k. The other problem is when the forces lost their hospitals they also lost some niche aeromedical skills which have had to be contracted out to the civil market.
 
What would be the cost saving if you didn't have to mobilise a C17/Voyager etc for a single patient or go to the civil air ambulance market for permissive area aero-meds. Cost to Canary Islands for an air ambulance is approx £25k to places like Niarobi £70 to 80k. The other problem is when the forces lost their hospitals they also lost some niche aeromedical skills which have had to be contracted out to the civil market.
Buying say 5 x specially configured G550 would cost probably upwards of £750M. The aeromed pods employed on the C-17s (a type we very rarely use for aeromed and one we have in service anyway) probably cost a few hundred thousand £. Another advantage is that we can aeromed mass casualties or carry other cargo simultaneously.

In terms of aeromed, I’m not aware of any aeromed we’ve contracted out but am happy to be corrected.

Very few nations have an aeromed capability and ours certainly exceeds the majority. Indeed, the US and numerous other nations came to the UK to be briefed on RAF infectious disease aeromed capabilities after what we did during the Ebola crisis.

Regards,
MM
 
Last edited:

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Buying say 5 x specially configured G550 would cost probably upwards of £750M. The aeromed pods employed on the C-17s (a type we very rarely use for aeromed and one we have in service anyway) probably cost a few hundred thousand £. Another advantage is that we can aeromed mass casualties or carry other cargo simultaneously.

In terms of aeromed, I’m not aware of any aeromed we’ve contracted out but am happy to be corrected.

Very few nations have an aeromed capability and ours certainly exceeds the majority. Indeed, the US and numerous other nations came to the UK to be briefed on RAF infectious disease aeromed capabilities after what we did during the Ebola crisis.

Regards,
MM
PM sent to you.

DM
 
Buying say 5 x specially configured G550 would cost probably upwards of £750M. The aeromed pods employed on the C-17s (a type we very rarely use for aeromed and one we have in service anyway) probably cost a few hundred thousand £. Another advantage is that we can aeromed mass casualties or carry other cargo simultaneously.

In terms of aeromed, I’m not aware of any aeromed we’ve contracted out but am happy to be corrected.

Very few nations have an aeromed capability and ours certainly exceeds the majority. Indeed, the US and numerous other nations came to the UK to be briefed on RAF infectious disease aeromed capabilities after what we did during the Ebola crisis.

Regards,
MM
Many, many moons ago (1986) there was no Aeromed available in Belize (I would think nothing had changed, although hopefully local hospital services have improved since). IIRC there was an arrangement with an Aeromed company in Miami to get serious cas that could not be treated within the country to a decent hospital in the US. Flash to bang was only a few hours as opposed to waiting for the trooper to arrive.

Digressing a bit IIRC part of the agreement for a fishing licence in the Falklands is that the companies have to have an Aeromed arrangement in their contracts. A number of times when I was there the RAF would pick up serious cas from ships and get back to MPA just as the Aeromed jet arrived from (normally) Santiago. One poor guy was in a terrible state, having been hit from face to abdomen by a wire that snapped on a squid jigger.
 
Buying say 5 x specially configured G550 would cost probably upwards of £750M. The aeromed pods employed on the C-17s (a type we very rarely use for aeromed and one we have in service anyway) probably cost a few hundred thousand £. Another advantage is that we can aeromed mass casualties or carry other cargo simultaneously.

In terms of aeromed, I’m not aware of any aeromed we’ve contracted out but am happy to be corrected.

Very few nations have an aeromed capability and ours certainly exceeds the majority. Indeed, the US and numerous other nations came to the UK to be briefed on RAF infectious disease aeromed capabilities after what we did during the Ebola crisis.

Regards,
MM
A while back admittedly but GW2 we were operating a Britannia Airways 757 ex AKT to “as directed” in the UK. The forward 2/3rds was fitted for litters with the aft 1/3rd seating.
 
The trouble with airbus - especially the French bits - is it cant decide if its a private company or nationalised industry
The new German boss threw in the towel after only a few months - On being aslked what the hardest part of running Airbus was he reputedly replied "The French"
I used to work for Hoechst - so this explained some rather "David and Goliath" takeovers by the French
How the French Do Business: Airbus and the Not-So-Invisible Hand - SPIEGEL ONLINE - International
 
A familiar story.

When the US Marines were shopping for a new fleet of helicopters for the Presidential Flight, I believe they favoured a Eurocopter. No chance of that getting funding but I think Trump cancelled the order entirely when he saw the price. He now has to manage the 5 minute flight from Washington to Andrews without a USB charging port for his phone.

Similarly, the US Air Force looked in to buying A380s as the replacement for Air Force One. The distinguished gentlemen of the US government added a clause to the requirement spec stating that the planes had to be built in America, for security reasons of course. Not feasible to build an Airbus factory in America just for 3 planes so POTUS may well be the last person ever to fly on a 747.

The USAF were interested in the cargo version of the A380, I think to replace their very large cargo planes (Galaxy ?). In a fit of engineering genius, the Tefal Heads at Airbus made the floor separating the two decks structural. It can't be removed so the A380-C could not carry outsized loads and, as has been mentioned, other aircraft can carry containerised air freight more efficiently.
You mean the Leonardo AW101 Merlin or Team US101

Anyhow then Eurocopter was not invited as sort of the bid lest what could they offer ? H225M (EC725 / AS532 / AS332) Likes of the Japanese Emperor flies in VIP H225M flown by the JGSDF , and Thai Royal Family fly in H225 operates by the RTHAF etc etc but somehow the Suepr Puma / Cougar / Caracal would not cut it as you cannot stand up really inside.

Cheers
 
I’ve flown on Emirates A380 several times and Qantas A380 .. bloody love it.

Very stable especially in turbulence also economy on an A380 is akin to premium economy on Virgin Atlantic and I’ve flown on Premium.

Malaysian Airlines had a revamp the other year in lieu of economic troubles largely to do with Mh370 and MH17. They hired a former chief executive from Ryanair to do the revamp and he shortly left / pushed out.
He was responsible for their decision to remove their A380 ( I was at Farnborough 2012 to see their new A380 fly my photos below )and bring in A350XWB , 737MAX etc. Also cutting a lot of European capital city routes as well. In a weird form or fashion ...bringing in regional airline mentality when in fact should have been concentrating on their long range connecting both sides of the globe.

Cheers

F1865B65-2EF4-473B-B2B7-0B7353F5B736.jpeg
CADC2FD5-06AD-4E79-95CD-41DB20D8BD0F.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Flown on a large number of airlines in various classes, flown a number of VVIP aircraft kitted out to suit Arabian Royalty. If its a comfortable seat, good food, attentive service and a good selection of drinks one will generally have a pleasant flight.

Worst seat pitch ever on Air France in the back of a 747, hardest seat on a Quatari 380 in the back, best flat bed on Delta 1st class 767, most pissed 1st class on a Ethiopian Airlines Comet when introduced to Tej, a type of Honey wine.

Shame about the 787, but sadly the wrong plane at the wrong time, an impressive technological achievement. The 350 will probably do better.

Have a son who is presently on an Airbus fleet and has flown the 320,321,and 330’s, and would like to fly the 350 which mates of his in other airlines reckons is great, while a younger son who is a Tech 2 with Delta and works on everything Delta has, but has done the 757/767 course the 777 course and the Airbus 350 course, and says he is surprised with the amount of tech faults Delta is having with this new aircraft, while the older Boeings he reckons are more primitive but more reliable.

Air travel has come a long way, from my first ever flight as a young boy on an Empire Flying boat from Lake Naivasha in Kenya to port Bell in Uganda. I was given unlimited ice-cream by a very kind Hostess as I was an unaccompanied minor, and sadly lost it all in the turbulence as we descended for landing on Lake Vic at Port Bell. But it was a first class service I never forgot
 
Flown on a large number of airlines in various classes, flown a number of VVIP aircraft kitted out to suit Arabian Royalty. If its a comfortable seat, good food, attentive service and a good selection of drinks one will generally have a pleasant flight.

Worst seat pitch ever on Air France in the back of a 747, hardest seat on a Quatari 380 in the back, best flat bed on Delta 1st class 767, most pissed 1st class on a Ethiopian Airlines Comet when introduced to Tej, a type of Honey wine.

Shame about the 787, but sadly the wrong plane at the wrong time, an impressive technological achievement. The 350 will probably do better.

Have a son who is presently on an Airbus fleet and has flown the 320,321,and 330’s, and would like to fly the 350 which mates of his in other airlines reckons is great, while a younger son who is a Tech 2 with Delta and works on everything Delta has, but has done the 757/767 course the 777 course and the Airbus 350 course, and says he is surprised with the amount of tech faults Delta is having with this new aircraft, while the older Boeings he reckons are more primitive but more reliable.

Air travel has come a long way, from my first ever flight as a young boy on an Empire Flying boat from Lake Naivasha in Kenya to port Bell in Uganda. I was given unlimited ice-cream by a very kind Hostess as I was an unaccompanied minor, and sadly lost it all in the turbulence as we descended for landing on Lake Vic at Port Bell. But it was a first class service I never forgot
The 350 is supposed to be good - only ever heard good things about it. I would like to try it out at some point.

And also, the Comet? Christ, you must have been flying around for a while!
 
Snip/

Digressing a bit IIRC part of the agreement for a fishing licence in the Falklands is that the companies have to have an Aeromed arrangement in their contracts. A number of times when I was there the RAF would pick up serious cas from ships and get back to MPA just as the Aeromed jet arrived from (normally) Santiago. One poor guy was in a terrible state, having been hit from face to abdomen by a wire that snapped on a squid jigger.
I feel his pain.

Sounds just like that one time a stretched bungee slipped and pinged me on the thumb.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Flown on a large number of airlines in various classes, flown a number of VVIP aircraft kitted out to suit Arabian Royalty. If its a comfortable seat, good food, attentive service and a good selection of drinks one will generally have a pleasant flight.

Worst seat pitch ever on Air France in the back of a 747, hardest seat on a Quatari 380 in the back, best flat bed on Delta 1st class 767, most pissed 1st class on a Ethiopian Airlines Comet when introduced to Tej, a type of Honey wine.

Shame about the 787, but sadly the wrong plane at the wrong time, an impressive technological achievement. The 350 will probably do better.

Have a son who is presently on an Airbus fleet and has flown the 320,321,and 330’s, and would like to fly the 350 which mates of his in other airlines reckons is great, while a younger son who is a Tech 2 with Delta and works on everything Delta has, but has done the 757/767 course the 777 course and the Airbus 350 course, and says he is surprised with the amount of tech faults Delta is having with this new aircraft, while the older Boeings he reckons are more primitive but more reliable.

Air travel has come a long way, from my first ever flight as a young boy on an Empire Flying boat from Lake Naivasha in Kenya to port Bell in Uganda. I was given unlimited ice-cream by a very kind Hostess as I was an unaccompanied minor, and sadly lost it all in the turbulence as we descended for landing on Lake Vic at Port Bell. But it was a first class service I never forgot
Empire Boat, feck me you're old
 

Latest Threads

Top