Airbus Announces Termination of A380 Production

#1
Airbus has announced that it will end production of its A380 'super-jumbo' in 2021 after final orders are delivered to Emirates. The announcement came after that airline elected to reduce its A380 order to 123 from the original 162 planned.

This is a reflection of some fundamentally poor market analysis by Airbus. After enormous investment in development of the A380, customer interest was far lower than anticipated as airlines modernised their fleets with smaller, twin-engined wide-bodies such as the 777 and 787. Airbus are arguably playing catch up in that market with the A350.

To add insult to injury, there's been no effort to develop a cargo variant. In contrast, production of Boeing 747 (the type the A380 was designed to displace in the high-capacity market) cargo variants will continue beyond 2021.

Overall, the A380 may be viewed as a modern day VC10: an aircraft which proved popular with its passengers but which was based on fundamentally flawed market analysis.

Regards,
MM
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#2
This is business at work, market forces not Brexit although I suspect the BBC will wave it about. I'm surprised but pleased that the Eu hasn't decided to bail it out with our money!
 
#3
This is business at work, market forces not Brexit although I suspect the BBC will wave it about. I'm surprised but pleased that the Eu hasn't decided to bail it out with our money!
Agreed.

I'm not pro-BREXIT but the writing's been on the wall for A380 for some time.

Regards,
MM
 
#4
It seems that scrapping is being considered for four Air Singapore A380s recently returned at the end of their leases*.

It appears that there is no market for used A380s.

*Source: Wikipedia

With four A380s leased to Singapore Airlines having been returned between October 2017 and March 2018, Dr. Peters fears a weak aftermarket and is considering scrapping them, although they are on sale for a business jet conversion,
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#5
Surely the Eu armed forces will take them, oh wait there aren't any (or are there) The Eu will be able to ship all of its refugees from Ireland (although no spuds as there isn't a cargo version yet) come independence day!:-D
 
#6
Wrong aircraft at the wrong time.
Vanity project to challenge the 747.
Too big, too complicated.

Designed for the hub and spoke model when everyone wanted smaller wide-body regional jets.
 
#7
It's probably an opportune time to remind people that the production of engines and wings that will no longer be supplied for an aircraft that will no longer be built, may well be outsourced to another EU country as a result of Brexit.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#8
It's probably an opportune time to remind people that the production of engines and wings that will no longer be supplied for an aircraft that will no longer be built, may well be outsourced to another EU country as a result of Brexit.
We have much to be thankful for, perhaps we can concentrate on stuff customers want!
 
#9
Airbus has announced that it will end production of its A380 'super-jumbo' in 2021 after final orders are delivered to Emirates. The announcement came after that airline elected to reduce its A380 order to 123 from the original 162 planned.

This is a reflection of some fundamentally poor market analysis by Airbus. After enormous investment in development of the A380, customer interest was far lower than anticipated as airlines modernised their fleets with smaller, twin-engined wide-bodies such as the 777 and 787. Airbus are arguably playing catch up in that market with the A350.

To add insult to injury, there's been no effort to develop a cargo variant. In contrast, production of Boeing 747 (the type the A380 was designed to displace in the high-capacity market) cargo variants will continue beyond 2021.

Overall, the A380 may be viewed as a modern day VC10: an aircraft which proved popular with its passengers but which was based on fundamentally flawed market analysis.

Regards,
MM
I think the market changed in ways that were not forecast by the "experts". One of the great hopes was the Chinese market, (hence the designation A380). Apart for 5 jets for China Southern Airlines, that fell totally flat.

Increasing fuel prices and the advent of the uber long-range twins (Boeing 777-300ER and X and ironically the Airbus A330NEO and A350 )sounded the death knell for quite possibly the last of the 4 engine jets in the passenger market.

The passenger Boeing 747-8 series has also been a flop. In simple language, the market has moved on.

A shame, for it is a great airplane to fly in.
 
#10
It's probably an opportune time to remind people that the production of engines and wings that will no longer be supplied for an aircraft that will no longer be built, may well be outsourced to another EU country as a result of Brexit.
In the fantasy world of the Brussels bubble, will massive subsidies be made available to move production of the A380 to one of the "emerging" eastern European EU member states?.

Only joking, but you never know...….
 
#11
When I was this I was about to write "old news" as I thought Airbus 330...

They are simply downsizing the order from the original revision for the 380, obviously thinking of costs and efficiency and as @ugly mentioned, economics at work.

Perhaps testing the water and taking existing statistics of flyers into account along with forecasted growth etc and other stuff that we would have a clue about
 
#13
It has been on the cards for some time so is no surprise really.

An impressive aircraft and with great agility at low speed, but just not wanted in any numbers.

Just as I will always remember Concordes last ever flight into Filton I will remember the A380 poodling about at low speed and great agility together with a spitfire over the airfield.

Same goes for the EAP in pre Eurofighter days.
 
#14
I flew on one a few weeks ago. Brilliant in cattle class especially for those of us who are short of leg.
I too had heard great things about the A380 economy seats but was underwhelmed when I flew in a Singapore Airlines jet. I've found the 787 economy class more comfortable.

Ultimately, I guess it depends on the configuration chosen by the airline.

Regards,
MM
 
#16
AIRBUS simply ignored what the market wanted and adopted the EU thinking 'we are huge, the world will come round to our way of thinking'.
Too big, too niche, too expensive… the world wanted big twins.

See the A400M for the other huge AIRBUS miscalculation - the world wanted a better C-130, not a pretend C-17

FWIW, The 747 was designed with a hump so it could be used as a freighter…
 
#20
It's probably an opportune time to remind people that the production of engines and wings that will no longer be supplied for an aircraft that will no longer be built, may well be outsourced to another EU country as a result of Brexit.
Airbus built a massive 700,000 sq ft facility in Broughton to manufacture the A380 wing - based on anticipated production of 60 units per year. It turned out they were only producing 6 units per year. This over-capacity in production and assembly facilities for the A380 is replicated across their European sites.

Not only that, they found the A380 wings were too large to fly out to Toulouse for assembly. So they built a railroad to the River Dee, where the wings are loaded onto a barge and taken up to Mostyn Port. From there they're ferried to Spain, put on another barge and finally arrive at Toulouse via a complex canal and road haulage system. A unique demonstration of how to assemble an aircraft by committee.
 

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