Air Weapons

#1
I know that i don't need a FAC for an air weapon, but is there a limit on how many i can transport at once or would i need authorisation/clearence to carry weapons in bulk.

If clearence of some sort is required where would i get said clearence?
 
#3
General_Layabout said:
I know that i don't need a FAC for an air weapon*, but is there a limit on how many i can transport at once or would i need authorisation/clearence to carry weapons in bulk.

If clearence of some sort is required where would i get said clearence?
* as long as its rated under 12ft/lbs

I believe air weapons must be in a lockable case when being transported, so chuck em all in a old MFO box and screw the lid down!
 
#4
Barrack Room Lawyer said:
General_Layabout said:
I know that i don't need a FAC for an air weapon*, but is there a limit on how many i can transport at once or would i need authorisation/clearence to carry weapons in bulk.

If clearence of some sort is required where would i get said clearence?
* as long as its rated under 12ft/lbs

I believe air weapons must be in a lockable case when being transported, so chuck em all in a old MFO box and screw the lid down!
No such requirement.
 
#5
EX_STAB said:
No authority required within the UK.
AS yet!!!!!!!



IIRC they should be concealed from view however; ie gun case etc. Although this may not be a mandatory requirement, it still fits best practice.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
No such requirement indeed when moving this kit around. However, all rifles must be made safe, and if out in the open on public land, then in their case, or if in a vehicle - out of sight.

If you are seen by a member of the public waving one around, or they see them in your motor, I sh!t you not, you can get done for causing alarm or distress if they go crying to plod saying they bricked it when they saw you with it.

I am aware of a chap down my way who has recently gone to court for exactly this.

Suffice to say: Use your noggin, keep them out of sight and made safe and you should be fine.
 
#7
Gremlin said:
EX_STAB said:
No authority required within the UK.
AS yet!!!!!!!



IIRC they should be concealed from view however; ie gun case etc. Although this may not be a mandatory requirement, it still fits best practice.
Must be in a secure cover that it cannot be fired - but only if in a public place in possession of a person under 18.
For adults, even for firearms there is no requirement to conceal a firearm or carry it in a gunslip even if in a public place. Of course whether this is advisable or even just good manners is another question but there is no requirement in law.

If anyone wants to argue the point of law perhaps they would be so good as to provide act and section rather than what they "think" the law may or ought to be. :)

(That's not a pop at you Gremmers, I'm just anticipating what is to come. :) )
 
#8
Some interesting reading here:

Airgun Forum

I suspect your average plod would have a orgasm if they pulled you over and looked in the boot of your car and found a pile of "firearms"!
 
#10
Biped said:
No such requirement indeed when moving this kit around. However, all rifles must be made safe, and if out in the open on public land, then in their case, or if in a vehicle - out of sight.

If you are seen by a member of the public waving one around, or they see them in your motor, I sh!t you not, you can get done for causing alarm or distress if they go crying to plod saying they bricked it when they saw you with it.

I am aware of a chap down my way who has recently gone to court for exactly this.

Suffice to say: Use your noggin, keep them out of sight and made safe and you should be fine.
No such requirement. May be good practice but no such requirement in law.

1968 Firearms act as amended said:
19.
Carrying firearm in a public place.
A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse (the proof whereof lies on him) he has with him in a public place
[F1 (a)
a loaded shot gun,
(b)
an air weapon (whether loaded or not),
(c)
any other firearm (whether loaded or not) together with ammunition suitable for use in that firearm, or
(d)
an imitation firearm.
It's irrelevant whether it's in a cover or out of sight.

Out of sight comes under guidance relating to carriage (specifically in regard to arms left in unattended vehicles) and is just that - guidance.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
EX_STAB said:
Biped said:
No such requirement indeed when moving this kit around. However, all rifles must be made safe, and if out in the open on public land, then in their case, or if in a vehicle - out of sight.

If you are seen by a member of the public waving one around, or they see them in your motor, I sh!t you not, you can get done for causing alarm or distress if they go crying to plod saying they bricked it when they saw you with it.

I am aware of a chap down my way who has recently gone to court for exactly this.

Suffice to say: Use your noggin, keep them out of sight and made safe and you should be fine.
No such requirement. May be good practice but no such requirement in law.

1968 Firearms act as amended said:
19.
Carrying firearm in a public place.
A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse (the proof whereof lies on him) he has with him in a public place
[F1 (a)
a loaded shot gun,
(b)
an air weapon (whether loaded or not),
(c)
any other firearm (whether loaded or not) together with ammunition suitable for use in that firearm, or
(d)
an imitation firearm.
It's irrelevant whether it's in a cover or out of sight.

Out of sight comes under guidance relating to carriage (specifically in regard to arms left in unattended vehicles) and is just that - guidance.
It is good practice, and I'm just repeating what I tell my customers. If I say "No requirement", there'll be more problems rather than less.

As I said though, I've had to assist one of my customers who got his air rifle taken off him and is being done for 'Causing alarm and distress' with it, simply because he was seen using it by a member of the public, on HIS OWN property.

I'm sure he'll get off, but the point is, good practice; might as well put it in your personal rule book.
 
#12
Biped said:
EX_STAB said:
Biped said:
No such requirement indeed when moving this kit around. However, all rifles must be made safe, and if out in the open on public land, then in their case, or if in a vehicle - out of sight.

If you are seen by a member of the public waving one around, or they see them in your motor, I sh!t you not, you can get done for causing alarm or distress if they go crying to plod saying they bricked it when they saw you with it.

I am aware of a chap down my way who has recently gone to court for exactly this.

Suffice to say: Use your noggin, keep them out of sight and made safe and you should be fine.
No such requirement. May be good practice but no such requirement in law.

1968 Firearms act as amended said:
19.
Carrying firearm in a public place.
A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse (the proof whereof lies on him) he has with him in a public place
[F1 (a)
a loaded shot gun,
(b)
an air weapon (whether loaded or not),
(c)
any other firearm (whether loaded or not) together with ammunition suitable for use in that firearm, or
(d)
an imitation firearm.
It's irrelevant whether it's in a cover or out of sight.

Out of sight comes under guidance relating to carriage (specifically in regard to arms left in unattended vehicles) and is just that - guidance.
It is good practice, and I'm just repeating what I tell my customers. If I say "No requirement", there'll be more problems rather than less.

As I said though, I've had to assist one of my customers who got his air rifle taken off him and is being done for 'Causing alarm and distress' with it, simply because he was seen using it by a member of the public, on HIS OWN property.

I'm sure he'll get off, but the point is, good practice; might as well put it in your personal rule book.
I'm all for good practice but people are too fond of making up restrictions that don't exist. I think this is damaging so am always keen to point out what the law actually is. I would be surprised if your customer has any case to answer to be honest.

I have heard all sorts of nonsense and especially exageration and extrapolation over the years. i once heard an RFD telling a lad he had to be 200 Yards from a foot path to use an air rifle. Wrong on three counts with that one!
:)
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
There's a helpful little book out there called 'Gun Law', which separates the fanciful from the actualite for the layman.

Well worth a read, as well as the Firearms Act of course ;-)
 
#14
EX_STAB said:
I have heard all sorts of nonsense and especially exageration and extrapolation over the years. i once heard an RFD telling a lad he had to be 200 Yards from a foot path to use an air rifle. Wrong on three counts with that one!
:)
What if you can only find a bridleway that is 400 yards away though :?
 
#15
Gremlin said:
EX_STAB said:
I have heard all sorts of nonsense and especially exageration and extrapolation over the years. i once heard an RFD telling a lad he had to be 200 Yards from a foot path to use an air rifle. Wrong on three counts with that one!
:)
What if you can only find a bridleway that is 400 yards away though :?
I see you're feeling better! :D
 
#16
Cheers for the heads up guys.

I was wondering as i work in transport and there's a possibility of transporting a load, palletised and shrink wrapped, from manufacturer to retailer. Although both parties were saying the same i just thought i'd cover my ass. :thumright: :thumleft:
 
#17
General_Layabout said:
Cheers for the heads up guys.

I was wondering as i work in transport and there's a possibility of transporting a load, palletised and shrink wrapped, from manufacturer to retailer. Although both parties were saying the same i just thought i'd cover my ass. :thumright: :thumleft:
Even if they were firearms subject to control you would still come under the exemption for common carriers.

1968 Firearms Act said:
9.
Carriers, auctioneers, etc.
— (1) A person carrying on the business of an auctioneer, carrier or warehouseman, or a servant of such a person, may, without holding a certificate, have in his possession a firearm or ammunition in the ordinary course of that business.
(2) It is not an offence under section 3(1) of this Act for an auctioneer to sell by auction, expose for sale by auction or have in his possession for sale by auction a firearm or ammunition without being registered as a firearms dealer, if he has obtained from the chief officer of police for the area in which the auction is held a permit for that purpose in the prescribed form and complies with the terms of the permit.
(3) It is an offence for a person [F1 knowingly or recklessly to make a statement false in any material particular] for the purpose of procuring, either for himself or for another person, the grant of a permit under subsection (2) of this section.
(4) It is not an offence under section 3(2) of this Act for a carrier or warehouseman, or a servant of a carrier or warehouseman, to deliver any firearm or ammunition in the ordinary course of his business or employment as such.
 
#20
Barrack Room Lawyer said:
I believe air weapons must be in a lockable case when being transported, so chuck em all in a old MFO box and screw the lid down!
No, in a public place, they should be in a case, gun slip or otherwise covered, and unloaded (unless you're controlling pigeons for the council or have some other reasonable excuse for not having them in such a state).

The case or slip need not be locked however.

Also, I suggest people look up the definition of "weapon" and "firearm". They are quite different, and the majority of air guns and sporting firearms are not weapons.
 

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