Air Ministry Marker Post

Clearing back some weeds, I found this in the bottom of the garden, now I know it is a boundary marker post but my question is did each airfield have unique numerical systems or were the numbers unique for each post in the UK. Or to put it another way, is this post 5A for its airfield or is it actually post 5A?

Grateful for any information.

AM Post 3a.jpg
 
It means your garden belongs to the RAF and they can use it as they see fit, always on the look out for somewhere to dump the odd rockape sqn.
 
As you might expect, someone somewhere has made a study of these:



:cool:

. . . now, I like researching the obscure but even that is a Google too far . . .
Fantastic, thank you, my geekometer has just gone galactic :)
 
Clearing back some weeds, I found this in the bottom of the garden, now I know it is a boundary marker post but my question is did each airfield have unique numerical systems or were the numbers unique for each post in the UK. Or to put it another way, is this post 5A for its airfield or is it actually post 5A?

Grateful for any information.

View attachment 455178
Ah, well now, it is a little known fact - and it is a fact nonetheless, that all operational airfields in use during WW2 were fitted with underground explosive charges codenamed crabsticks. The purpose of these charges was to destroy the airfields in the event that UK mainland was occupied by the chaps with smarter uniforms.
The marker in your picture identifies the Datum Point of such explosive demolition charges and you are therefore the lucky owner of about 20 tons of buried nitro glycerine explosives.
Have a nice day.
 
Ah, well now, it is a little known fact - and it is a fact nonetheless, that all operational airfields in use during WW2 were fitted with underground explosive charges codenamed crabsticks. The purpose of these charges was to destroy the airfields in the event that UK mainland was occupied by the chaps with smarter uniforms.
The marker in your picture identifies the Datum Point of such explosive demolition charges and you are therefore the lucky owner of about 20 tons of buried nitro glycerine explosives.
Have a nice day.
Just as well that it is a married quarter then ^~
 
Clearing back some weeds, I found this in the bottom of the garden, now I know it is a boundary marker post but my question is did each airfield have unique numerical systems or were the numbers unique for each post in the UK. Or to put it another way, is this post 5A for its airfield or is it actually post 5A?

Grateful for any information.

View attachment 455178
Could it be a survey marker point.

I was once tasked to a suspect device next to a helipad in FYROM, it turned out to be a small concrete point that I later found out from GEO were used as reference to survey an area.

The RAF WO who tasked us was mightily embarrassed, but I’ve never ridiculed anybody for making a genuine call when it comes to EOD. I can’t speak for those he worked with though.
 
How interesting. Are there any plans/photos of the airfield when built readily available? If your stone lies at a boundary, then there's the answer. If not, then, erm, not :)
Its definitely an Air Ministry boundary marker, most of the hangars are industrial units now, but the grass strip is still in operation (just). I was just curious about numbering?
 

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