Air Corps

#1
Are there any particular A-levels that are looked for if you want to become an AAC pilot because I'm taking mine next year and was not sure, I'm thinking of Physics, Chemistry, Maths and Geography for A-S but there might be others, also does anyone know if it would be better to go to uni or not because I don't really want to but if it'll help me get into the air corps will. I am thinking of getting so flying lessons in year 12 or 13 but was talking to someone on the internet who said that would mean I would be expected a lot more of and a much steeper learning curve if I do get in, do you think it would put to much pressure on me or not,

Thanks for any helpful comments, it is much appreciated
 
#2
Time spent in education is never wasted, It will always be of use if your plans to become a pilot go wrong, getting some flying hours in will not do any harm, you might not like flying, on your course keep quiet about it best of luck
 
#3
I know what your saying about education but uni to me seems like 4 years of increasing debt and unless it will significantly improve my chances of getting into Sandhurst and Middle Wallop then I'd rather not. By 'on your course keep quiet about it' do you mean don't say that I have flying experience because I was thinking that might increase my initial chance of getting in
 
#4
Have a look at the rates of pay for young officers with and without degrees, see if that sways you in any direction.
 
#5
SheepJumpFish said:
I know what your saying about education but uni to me seems like 4 years of increasing debt and unless it will significantly improve my chances of getting into Sandhurst and Middle Wallop then I'd rather not. By 'on your course keep quiet about it' do you mean don't say that I have flying experience because I was thinking that might increase my initial chance of getting in
They won't care that you have a few PPL hours, you will still have to do the same course and aircrew selection as the other students,some of who may be aircrew, but not pilots, with hundreds of hours of flying time.as for UNI you have to think what you are going to do after you leave the forces. It will give you another string to your bow if things go wrong. And take it from me four years is not a long time. I did not go to Uni untill was 39 as I joined the Army aged 15. I was aircrew for 7 years and loved ever minute
 
#6
Could you give a link possibly for the pay rates, and I know it won't make a significant difference having a few hours but it might show that I'm capable, if I can't join the army for some reason then I will go to uni but I don't see it as helping me too much if I do get into the army
 
#7
SheepJumpFish said:
Could you give a link possibly for the pay rates, and I know it won't make a significant difference having a few hours but it might show that I'm capable, if I can't join the army for some reason then I will go to uni but I don't see it as helping me too much if I do get into the army
You could always try typing "army rates of pay" into Google? With the level of initative you have shown thus far, I would abandon your Air Corps aspirations and set your sights on becoming the next Pope instead; which is far more likely to happen. =(

http://www.armedforces.co.uk/armypayscales.htm
 
#8
oooo spikey!
 
#9
Well thankyou for the link but I did look briefly and could not find a comparison between people who have gone to uni and those who haven't. I do not see any point in your stupid comments about becoming the next Pope as I think the church would find it rather undesirable to have an atheist as their leader or whatever he does, also you saying something like that after one display of a lack of initiative seems a wee bit hasty as you can not judge on one sentence whether I would be competent enough to becoming a pilot.
 
#11
Lampard said:
Non Graduate Officer Cadet £15,268
Graduate Officer Cadet / Second Lieutenant £24,133

http://www.armyjobs.mod.uk/benefits/pay/Pages/Officer.aspx

That took me about 30 seconds on Google.

Armyjobs....Pay...Regular Officer...Oh look..

So...why only look briefly?
Just had a mooch at that.

So: Officer Cdt non grad - 14k whilst at RMAS
Officer Cdt grad - 24k whilst at RMAS?

Then 3 years seniority (basically get an extra pip quicker)?
 
#12
Correct, though if someone could come and verify that'd be tip top.
As far as i'm aware that's right, though.
 
#13
SheepJumpFish said:
Well thankyou for the link but I did look briefly and could not find a comparison between people who have gone to uni and those who haven't. I do not see any point in your stupid comments about becoming the next Pope as I think the church would find it rather undesirable to have an atheist as their leader or whatever he does, also you saying something like that after one display of a lack of initiative seems a wee bit hasty as you can not judge on one sentence whether I would be competent enough to becoming a pilot.
The comparison was simply to look at the different levels of pay for each rank. In very simple terms (which you clearly need) - graduates get additional seniority for their time at university and therefore get promoted earlier and therefore paid more. As for your lack of aspiration about becoming Pope - maybe I will take your advice if you ever get to RMAS and manage to pass the course. Since that is currently no more than an aspiration on your part at present, let's just leave it there. You will, however, be well advised to lighten up a little and be prepared to take a bit of stick if you ever want to survive in the Army.
 
#14
These days virtually 100% of all RMAS entrants are graduates. Whether that is a good or bad thing I dont know. What I do know is that although a huge number of graduates have mickey mouse degrees and can barely write their own names ; without one you are treated as a second class citizen. Also the AAC must be just about the hardest outfit to get into for officer pilots. Plus if you do get in you get a very short flying career. Options might be to join another regiment and go AAC on "secondment" like Prince Harry or for a dedicated flying career join the RAF.
 
#16
Go to uni, those that have been to uni tend to shine more - a lot of non grad struggle on the maturity side and with other aspects of the CC, however saying that, there are some very good non grads but they are the vast minority of non grads. The pay and promotion are significantly better - as a non grad you will be a one pip wonder for a long time in comparison to your graduate counter parts.

As far as the AAC goes - selecting maths and physics in only fine if you're good at them. Pick subjects you'll excel in; it's better to have the grades. Same goes with a degree - do something you'll enjoy and do well in. And back to the uni thing - go to uni, join the OTC or if you want to fly, the UAS and get your flying experience for free. Steer clear of the civvy world as far as flying goes - a trial flight to see if you like it isn't going to matter but a PPL might screw you over as military flying is very different to civvy flying in many respects and unless you have the ability to ignore your PPL training and fly as the military want you will struggle. Civvy flying will help in the early stages, if anything up to circuit work but after that it's useless - so save your cash and go to uni and do it for free.
 
#17
So they get paid more than you, they've also got to pay off all that debt. So they get three years seniority, you're three years younger than them. It all really depends on you as a person. The main AOSB will tell you if your mature enough to handle it at 18 or not. Maybe you should get the main board out of the way first then make your decision.
 
#18
Major_Clanger said:
Go to uni, those that have been to uni tend to shine more - a lot of non grad struggle on the maturity side and with other aspects of the CC, however saying that, there are some very good non grads but they are the vast minority of non grads. The pay and promotion are significantly better - as a non grad you will be a one pip wonder for a long time in comparison to your graduate counter parts.

As far as the AAC goes - selecting maths and physics in only fine if you're good at them. Pick subjects you'll excel in; it's better to have the grades. Same goes with a degree - do something you'll enjoy and do well in. And back to the uni thing - go to uni, join the OTC or if you want to fly, the UAS and get your flying experience for free. Steer clear of the civvy world as far as flying goes - a trial flight to see if you like it isn't going to matter but a PPL might screw you over as military flying is very different to civvy flying in many respects and unless you have the ability to ignore your PPL training and fly as the military want you will struggle. Civvy flying will help in the early stages, if anything up to circuit work but after that it's useless - so save your cash and go to uni and do it for free.

Major Clanger is 100% on the button. I joined as a non-grad in the early 90s, and if I could go back and make any changes then the one I'd choose would be to go to University. The mindset of "I want to get stuck in straight away" evaporates at about week 3 of groundschool (well it did for me anyway), and make no bones about it, those that get all the prizes, come top of the flying courses and go on and do the best in the mob tend to be graduates. Not for one moment rubbbishing the non-grads / SNCO pilots of the AAC / ex-rankers, but that's what I've seen from my perspective.

His points about civvy flying are spot on as well. Civvy flying is all about getting you and yr aeroplane from A to B, whereas mil flying is about using your aircraft and crew as a weapons system (maybe not the TriStar fleet but that's another thread!!!!) Give PPL-ing a go for a couple of hours to see if you like it (and also to make sure you aren't one of these clowns who freezes / can't think / gets stressed in the airborne environment) but chucking large sums of cash at it would be a waste of money in the longer term I'd suggest.

Feel free to PM me if I can offer any further advice.
 
#19
It sounds a bit Walty but there are some cracking flight sims for computers now to teach yourself the rudiments and see if you have any coordination and air sense. You can also learn a fair bit about energy management and the angle of attack.
 
#20
duffdike said:
It sounds a bit Walty but there are some cracking flight sims for computers now to teach yourself the rudiments and see if you have any coordination and air sense. You can also learn a fair bit about energy management and the angle of attack.
Duffdike
Not Walty in the slightest mate. Friends of mine who have made the leap to Virgin tell me that line conversion is pretty much all done on simulators, with your 1st "live" trip being an Orlando run with 400+ shellsuits in the back!

But then they also tell me that they shag lots of hosties, so who am I to believe?? Sighhh, reminds me of this advert

Virgin 25th Advert
 

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