AH in Herrick

#2
:omfg:
nails or a screw loose????.... nails me thinks..!
A truly heroic effort!!!!
Sterling work gentlemen!
 
#3
I'm speechless. A big hand of respect to all those involved!

..... the pilots also leaving the helicopters to give covering fire.
Puts "Soldier first" into a whole new perspective!
 
#4
mega,
outstanding courage.
I heard the yanks have done this a few times in Iraq as well.
must be one hell of a ride strapping yourself to the outside of that machine!!!!

its a crying shame that this act was in vain.

my condolences to the family, friends and comrades of that man.

RIP
 
#5
dancing_colonel1 said:
mega,
outstanding courage.
I heard the yanks have done this a few times in Iraq as well.
must be one hell of a ride strapping yourself to the outside of that machine!!!!

its a crying shame that this act was in vain.

my condolences to the family, friends and comrades of that man.

RIP
One would tend to disagree that it was in vain - the family need to lay their loved one to rest, but i take your point that the men risked their lives to rescue someone who couldnt thank them in person
 
#6
Most will have been following this in current affairs and there has been suggestion there, that this may have been in vain?

If I may just take the liberty to re-post my response here:

subbsonic said:
Many have spoken from the heart, and more eloquently than I about why we should never leave a comrade in the hands of this tribal enemy.

Any cost-benefit analysis should consider the free publicity that the adversary will get if that warfighter's body is towed around in front of the worlds TV by a horse, or Toyota pick-up.

At home the effect on the media and the politicians will be instantaneous, they will go into shock. Worse a grieving relative could appear claiming there is no justification for the war.

Many families sat at home, fearing their loved ones might be next.
In the textbooks they use the phrase " shatter their cohesion"

What price a strategic propaganda defeat for the United Kingdom?

The men and women of the JHC and the Marines of 45 Commando decided, probably instictively and in the heat of battle, to act immediately in defence of a fallen comrade. Could there be any greater sign of respect for LCPL Frost ?

At the tactical level this was the right thing to do.
At the strategic level, this was the only thing to do.

This Immediate Action is a tribute to the professionalism of all our armed forces. I think we have all just had more than our return on investment.

This year again, I will be wearing my Poppy with pride and a large slice of humility. Can someone tell me where I send the cheque for a barrel ?
surely a very proud day for any remaining glider pilots?
Much respect to all from TWA who had a hand in this :thumright:
 
#7
Fair play to all involved, deserve every bit of praise they have coming to them, whether it was in the RTS or not.

What I don’t get though, is why did the aircrew get out and start providing fire support? Why didn’t they just lift into the hover and provide fire support from the big noisy ****** under the nose??

RIP LCpl Ford.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
20NOV1917 said:
dancing_colonel1 said:
mega,
outstanding courage.
I heard the yanks have done this a few times in Iraq as well.
must be one hell of a ride strapping yourself to the outside of that machine!!!!

its a crying shame that this act was in vain.

my condolences to the family, friends and comrades of that man.

RIP
One would tend to disagree that it was in vain - the family need to lay their loved one to rest, but i take your point that the men risked their lives to rescue someone who couldnt thank them in person
Even so, i bet he was looking down, and saying "f**k me lads, nice one!"

Cant wait to read the citations...!
 
#11
EX_STAB said:
Are RM elegible for DFC?

If ever there was a case, this is it.
Only if they sat in the cab i reckon, not ON it, MC is the ground equiv so..... Blddy good on em and big swingers! :numberone:
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
Apparently this is something they train for? If so, would it still merit a hatful of medals? I mean no disrespect whatsoever, but am thinking of a precedent being set. If these guys get DFC's/CGC's/MC's etc for this one, will the next people to do this get the same?
 
#13
chrisg46 said:
Apparently this is something they train for? If so, would it still merit a hatful of medals? I mean no disrespect whatsoever, but am thinking of a precedent being set. If these guys get DFC's/CGC's/MC's etc for this one, will the next people to do this get the same?

Train for? I don't seem to recall that this sort of thing was on the AH CTT or in any of the exercises taught at Wallop.


......"Wallop tower, this is Carnage 1, finals for the HALs, 2 on board, 2 strapped to the outside........"




Disrespect shown.

Chiseller.
 
#16
Two_Forward_One_Back said:
What I don’t get though, is why did the aircrew get out and start providing fire support? Why didn’t they just lift into the hover and provide fire support from the big noisy f***** under the nose??
The two AH that landed were out of cannon and rockets!!!

Another AH gave cover.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
The Lord Flasheart said:
chrisg46 said:
Apparently this is something they train for? If so, would it still merit a hatful of medals? I mean no disrespect whatsoever, but am thinking of a precedent being set. If these guys get DFC's/CGC's/MC's etc for this one, will the next people to do this get the same?

Train for? I don't seem to recall that this sort of thing was on the AH CTT or in any of the exercises taught at Wallop.


......"Wallop tower, this is Carnage 1, finals for the HALs, 2 on board, 2 strapped to the outside........"




Disrespect shown.

Chiseller.
then i apologise unreservedly, because i have absolute respect for anyone who does something like this, wouldnt surprise to see all of these get a high level award, they deserve it.

However...

Richard_North wrote:
This is how its done, apparently:



Hi res photo here:

www.pentagon.mil/news/...01d_hr.jpg - you can see exactly how he does it.

Report also of it having been done in April 2002 in Afghanistan

I've heard of this before - apparently the Israelis found that some doors on their AH-1 Cobras (ammunition hatch springs to mind, but what do I know) could be sat on; so they added a strap that would act as a seatbelt. This allowed them to carry out buddy-CSAR, so that a downed Cobra could have its crew rescued by another, rather than having to watch the race between the transport helicopter or the angry mob arriving first. Apparently one of the newer Russian gunships had a void that was tweaked to do the job - HOKUM or HAVOC, can't remember which.

Anyway, the Israelis got their shiny new Apaches a decade or more ago, and promptly started looking for a way to achieve the same thing; looks like it's become a known trick for Apache users...

All credit to the blokes who did it, mind you...
is what i was getting at.
 
#18
Does having Royal strapped to the outside affect the disarming procedure?

Are they primed with stella for example as an arming procedure? :thumleft:

Visions of groundies approaching the cab with baseball bats in the event of a hangfire :threaten: :mrgreen:
 
#20
Chaps, quick q, any of you remember any ex Scots DG who would have been in NI in 90-91, poss a Lt Col in 99?? Please PM me if you have any ideas.... Ta muchly
 
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