Ageing (ferociously)

#61
That is the most awkward thing about getting older, you might have thousands of internet fwends, but real life friends shrink as they die faster than they're replaced and you don't really make friends so easily as you did in your younger years
A study was done a few years back showing the age of 25 is when you have the highest number of actual in person friends, after that it’s down hill. You lose what is considered a lifelong friend every seven years until you are eighty, then it picks up again as your children/grandchildren become closer to you in more of a friendship way than purely as a descendent.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#62
A study was done a few years back showing the age of 25 is when you have the highest number of actual in person friends, after that it’s down hill. You lose what is considered a lifelong friend every seven years until you are eighty, then it picks up again as your children/grandchildren become closer to you in more of a friendship way than purely as a descendent.
Don't forget "studies" only represent the sort of people who participate in studies. :D
 
#63

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#64
I've read most of a book called "Younger Next Year" aimed at people our age.
That's what got me motivated to lose weight & regain as much fitness as possible.
Lost nigh on 50lb in a year without making any big changes apart from reducing the beer consumption & walking a lot more.
It's perhaps correct to say that 'regimes' of perhaps gentle to moderate activity works well, while diets do not.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#65
It's perhaps correct to say that 'regimes' of perhaps gentle to moderate activity works well, while diets do not.

It's not fecking rocket surgery - I saw a chubby lass puffing away in our local park this afternoon. Fair play to her, but I felt like saying "lose a couple of stone first, then exercise might be a bit easier".

It actually makes me feel sad when I see fat people jogging etc. God bless em , but they need to shed several stones before going on the exercise kick!
 
#66
Turning 61 this year. 15 year old in the house keeps me on my toes and running around showing him how to do the things I learnt to do.

Not very active at the moment with the spine op and the knacked knee from flying off the mountain bike. I should be back at it again in a couple of months when I get the 6 month all clear for the spine op.

I enjoy shooting with my gang on the range. They are all much younger than me with a spread from early 30's to just over 40. What I really like about it is that they are all former US SF of one flavour or another and they let me (a remf) play on the range with them, teach me bad habits like breaching and room clearing and I coach them with their pistol technique.

I have no intention of going quietly, laying down, or stopping doing stupid stuff - you only get this thing called life one time so I intend to carry on making the best out of it. I want to go up Kilimanjaro in a couple or three years if anyone else is interested.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#67
It's not fecking rocket surgery - I saw a chubby lass puffing away in our local park this afternoon. Fair play to her, but I felt like saying "lose a couple of stone first, then exercise might be a bit easier".

It actually makes me feel sad when I see fat people jogging etc. God bless em , but they need to shed several stones before going on the exercise kick!
Greetings stbob! I have been at the fitness regime all my life, but now it's just exercise for me, mostly walking, very often, and every day if possible and rarely less than 5 to 7k each time. That works wonders for me, I can eat what I want, I have the same waist as when I left the army 20 years ago. I really believe that people who want to feel the benefit should get on their feet, and often. it's the best 'clinic' there is for both mind and body.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#68
Greetings stbob! I have been at the fitness regime all my life, but now it's just exercise for me, mostly walking, very often, and every day if possible and rarely less than 5 to 7k each time. That works wonders for me, I can eat what I want, I have the same waist as when I left the army 20 years ago. I really believe that people who want to feel the benefit should get on their feet, and often. it's the best 'clinic' there is for both mind and body.
I thoroughly agree sights!

You've probably never been seriously overweight (don't get me started on the "bariatric" issue!). The point I was making was this , and speaking from personal experience - if someone is unfit and also overweight, they need to drastically curtail their calorie intake and lose weight first before embarking on any exercise programme - a) the exercise will be much easier and b) safer!
 
#69
It's not fecking rocket surgery - I saw a chubby lass puffing away in our local park this afternoon. Fair play to her, but I felt like saying "lose a couple of stone first, then exercise might be a bit easier".

It actually makes me feel sad when I see fat people jogging etc. God bless em , but they need to shed several stones before going on the exercise kick!
You still not at the jogging stage yet then ?.
 
#73
It's perhaps correct to say that 'regimes' of perhaps gentle to moderate activity works well, while diets do not.
I think it's a bit of both TBH & certainly becoming a "man of leisure" means my carb intake's fallen quite dramatically, as Fish & chips, pizza & pastie rarely feature in my diet these days, rather than five or six days a week (at least with the pasties I had to walk 200yds - the pizza place was next door...)
 
#76
It's perhaps correct to say that 'regimes' of perhaps gentle to moderate activity works well, while diets do not.
Just don't follow my exercise regime of doing sod all for ages and then hiking 13 miles up and down mountains, only to to be siting on the sofa with stabbing pains in my legs from body telling me to give it a rest
 
#77
Sorted.

You know there is a climbing fee? etc, etc?
Oh heck aye - looks like $3k & up for a trek up one of the less cluttered routes with park fees & decent guides etc.
Just had a quick look & the climb itself appears to be a 6-8 day trek, with the latter better for both the views & lessening the effects of altitude sickness (I know I'm OK for at least a couple of days above 12,000 though it gives me chronic insomnia).
I might combine it with a hunt (if there's still hunting to be had...).
 
#78
Just don't follow my exercise regime of doing sod all for ages and then hiking 13 miles up and down mountains, only to to be siting on the sofa with stabbing pains in my legs from body telling me to give it a rest
I did that on Monday, well, 9½miles & was actually OK by the evening.
 

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