Ageing (ferociously)

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#1
Hi, my name's Goaty - and I'm not old, just 61. ( ;-D )

Saw this, it resonated,thought it might be of interest;

Age against the machine: the secret to enjoying a long life


Three years ago, Carl Honoré, the journalist whose series of books, starting with In Praise of Slow in 2004, has made him the guru of slow living, had an epiphany. Like a true Canadian, though one born in Scotland and domiciled in London, he adores ice hockey, and still plays hard and fast at the age of 51. But one day, at a tournament in Gateshead, someone pointed out that he was the oldest player among the 240 competitors. “I knew that I was one of the oldest, but being told in such raw terms that I was the oldest – it just shook me. It knocked me for six in a way that shocked me.”

1. If you think of yourself as old, you will be old. The media will bang on about dementia and loneliness, but ignore them. Concentrate on the upside.

2. Take yourself out of your comfort zone. Resist being pigeonholed; keep experimenting; challenge yourself and society’s stereotyping of you.

3. Try to stay healthy. Eat well and take lots of exercise – it’s good for brain and body. Exercise doesn’t have to mean playing competitive ice hockey; the odd brisk walk will keep you in shape.

4. Look for positive role models. Helen Mirren, David Attenborough and, best of all, Michelangelo, who lived until the ripe old age (in 16th-century terms) of 88 and spent the final 20 years of his life designing and overseeing the construction of St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Now that’s a way to go out.

5. Seek to become the person you always wanted to be. One reason many people are at their happiest in their 60s is that they feel freer and less beholden to others. They contain all their previous selves and can start to make sense of them.

6. Don’t just maintain social connections with your own age group: mix across the generations as much as you can. Inter-generational contact has become increasingly difficult, but if we can do it we benefit – and society benefits.

7. Be willing to let stuff go. If that friendship isn’t working, drop it. Streamline your life. There is less time left, so make it count.

8. Ageing should be a process of opening rather than closing doors. “We will lose some things – speed, stamina, a bit of mental agility – but in many other respects we gain,” says Honoré. We learn new skills, have greater social awareness, are likely to be more altruistic, are “lighter” in our approach to life – because we are less hung up on creating a good impression – and can see the bigger picture. It may be that we are in a position to make a greater contribution to society in our 60s and 70s than in our so-called prime.

9. Honesty is the best policy. Don’t try to pretend you are not 75 or 85 or whatever age you are. “As soon as we start lying about our age, we’re giving the number a terrible power – a power it doesn’t deserve,” says Honoré. People do it because there are so many ageist assumptions attached to age, but the way to fight back is to subvert those assumptions.

10. Society tells us that sex, love and romance belong to the young, but it’s not true. Plenty of older people continue to experience the joy of sex. But there are no rules: have as much – or as little – as you want. Some older people see it as a blessed release to escape the shackles of falling in love (and lust), but others can’t imagine life without it. Whatever turns you on.

11. Ignore people who say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. You can. Despite the common perception that creativity is the preserve of the young, we can get more creative as we get older. Our neural networks loosen up and we have the confidence and freedom to challenge groupthink. Honoré was encouraged last year when the Turner prize abolished its age limit for artists. Michelangelo could have been a contender.

12. Don’t pretend death isn’t coming. Embrace it – just not yet. “It’s useful to know our lives are bookended,” says Honoré. “When time is running out, it becomes more precious. It gives life shape and, in some ways, meaning.” Don’t dwell morbidly on it, but don’t shy away from it either. The closer you get to it, the less you are likely to fear it and the greater your focus will be on the things that really matter.

----------------------- ends -------------------------

It's a thing. Take from it what you will, but don't shoot the piano player.
 
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#2
I've read most of a book called "Younger Next Year" aimed at people our age.
That's what got me motivated to lose weight & regain as much fitness as possible.
Lost nigh on 50lb in a year without making any big changes apart from reducing the beer consumption & walking a lot more.
 
#3
Hi, my name's Goaty - and I'm not old, just 61. ( ;-D )

Saw this, it resonated,thought it might be of interest;

Age against the machine: the secret to enjoying a long life


Three years ago, Carl Honoré, the journalist whose series of books, starting with In Praise of Slow in 2004, has made him the guru of slow living, had an epiphany. Like a true Canadian, though one born in Scotland and domiciled in London, he adores ice hockey, and still plays hard and fast at the age of 51. But one day, at a tournament in Gateshead, someone pointed out that he was the oldest player among the 240 competitors. “I knew that I was one of the oldest, but being told in such raw terms that I was the oldest – it just shook me. It knocked me for six in a way that shocked me.”

1. If you think of yourself as old, you will be old. The media will bang on about dementia and loneliness, but ignore them. Concentrate on the upside.

2. Take yourself out of your comfort zone. Resist being pigeonholed; keep experimenting; challenge yourself and society’s stereotyping of you.

3. Try to stay healthy. Eat well and take lots of exercise – it’s good for brain and body. Exercise doesn’t have to mean playing competitive ice hockey; the odd brisk walk will keep you in shape.

4. Look for positive role models. Helen Mirren, David Attenborough and, best of all, Michelangelo, who lived until the ripe old age (in 16th-century terms) of 88 and spent the final 20 years of his life designing and overseeing the construction of St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Now that’s a way to go out.

5. Seek to become the person you always wanted to be. One reason many people are at their happiest in their 60s is that they feel freer and less beholden to others. They contain all their previous selves and can start to make sense of them.

6. Don’t just maintain social connections with your own age group: mix across the generations as much as you can. Inter-generational contact has become increasingly difficult, but if we can do it we benefit – and society benefits.

7. Be willing to let stuff go. If that friendship isn’t working, drop it. Streamline your life. There is less time left, so make it count.

8. Ageing should be a process of opening rather than closing doors. “We will lose some things – speed, stamina, a bit of mental agility – but in many other respects we gain,” says Honoré. We learn new skills, have greater social awareness, are likely to be more altruistic, are “lighter” in our approach to life – because we are less hung up on creating a good impression – and can see the bigger picture. It may be that we are in a position to make a greater contribution to society in our 60s and 70s than in our so-called prime.

9. Honesty is the best policy. Don’t try to pretend you are not 75 or 85 or whatever age you are. “As soon as we start lying about our age, we’re giving the number a terrible power – a power it doesn’t deserve,” says Honoré. People do it because there are so many ageist assumptions attached to age, but the way to fight back is to subvert those assumptions.

10. Society tells us that sex, love and romance belong to the young, but it’s not true. Plenty of older people continue to experience the joy of sex. But there are no rules: have as much – or as little – as you want. Some older people see it as a blessed release to escape the shackles of falling in love (and lust), but others can’t imagine life without it. Whatever turns you on.

11. Ignore people who say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. You can. Despite the common perception that creativity is the preserve of the young, we can get more creative as we get older. Our neural networks loosen up and we have the confidence and freedom to challenge groupthink. Honoré was encouraged last year when the Turner prize abolished its age limit for artists. Michelangelo could have been a contender.

12. Don’t pretend death isn’t coming. Embrace it – just not yet. “It’s useful to know our lives are bookended,” says Honoré. “When time is running out, it becomes more precious. It gives life shape and, in some ways, meaning.” Don’t dwell morbidly on it, but don’t shy away from it either. The closer you get to it, the less you are likely to fear it and the greater your focus will be on the things that really matter.

----------------------- ends -------------------------

It's a thing. Take from it what you will, but don't shoot the piano player.
I'd say that 10 of the 12 points you listed are not exclusive to ageing, they are sound advice for life no matter what age you take them on board.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#4
It's a thing. Take from it what you will, but don't shoot the piano player
' this is my piano...it plays good choons...you hum it, I'll play it!'

 
#5
The closer you get to it, the less you are likely to fear it and the greater your focus will be on the things that really matter
Love it.
 
#6
I have settled into the "morose old sod" thing.
The ever young Mrs.B&B just hits me with the cattle prod to encourage me through the day.
Just once, first thing, before she goes to work.
She is a blessing.


Lost nigh on 50lb in a year without making any big changes apart from reducing the beer consumption & walking a lot more.
Spot on with this.
Mine was/is wine.
 
#7
Agree with th op. I went out on the mountain bike this morning. Stopped at the gym for 40 minutes of light weight work.
Uphill on the way home, I pass the local surgery and ask at the pharmacy if they have my hypertension meds. Doc insists on taking my BP. It’s 120/80.
Even after about exercise.
Yes I try to eat less crap and I have cut down on the drink, but I still waste 40 tabs a day.
I’m 64 and three quarters. :) My partner is 38. I still wear denim.
 
#8
Agree with th op. I went out on the mountain bike this morning. Stopped at the gym for 40 minutes of light weight work.
Uphill on the way home, I pass the local surgery and ask at the pharmacy if they have my hypertension meds. Doc insists on taking my BP. It’s 120/80.
Even after about exercise.
Yes I try to eat less crap and I have cut down on the drink, but I still waste 40 tabs a day.
I’m 64 and three quarters. :) My partner is 38. I still wear denim.
40 fags a day? Good effort!

I stopped about 4 years ago but even at my heaviest smoking days, l couldnt put away 40 in a day.

Where do you find the time?

You must feel like shit all the time mate.
 
#9
40 fags a day? Good effort!

I stopped about 4 years ago but even at my heaviest smoking days, l couldnt put away 40 in a day.

Where do you find the time?

You must feel like shit all the time mate.
10 years ago come February 5th, I was smoking 50+ a day.
I haven't touched them since, or even been tempted to. I did however put on 4 stone, which is most of what I'm working at removing.
 
#10
40 fags a day? Good effort!

I stopped about 4 years ago but even at my heaviest smoking days, l couldnt put away 40 in a day.

Where do you find the time?

You must feel like shit all the time mate.
I live in a Muslim country so I get by on lots of fish chicken and coffee.
Please allow me some disgraceful aging benefits.
I do try to exercise often as hard as my arthritis will allow. Swimming cycling and gym.
I know the risks. ;)
 
#12
I'm 66, own two Moto Guzzi's and plan to buy a new one this year.
I do a dozen or more rallies a year and there are people there 10 years older than me. 2 recently got married.
I drink beer and whisky everyday and smoke occasionally (about 100 last year.
I don't do running but enjoy walking even if just around the village I live in.
The funniest thing about being retired is I now meet many other retired people whilst walking who I never met before.
The only negative thing is that unfortunately very few young people get into rallying/touring on motorbikes.
My father made 95, I want to beat that.
 
#13
I'm 66, own two Moto Guzzi's and plan to buy a new one this year.
I do a dozen or more rallies a year and there are people there 10 years older than me. 2 recently got married.
I drink beer and whisky everyday and smoke occasionally (about 100 last year.
I don't do running but enjoy walking even if just around the village I live in.
The funniest thing about being retired is I now meet many other retired people whilst walking who I never met before.
The only negative thing is that unfortunately very few young people get into rallying/touring on motorbikes.
My father made 95, I want to beat that.
My next door neighbour had a California. Went to loads of rallys. Never missed the V twin at Fordingbridge.
 
#14
If you have children, you can do everything on the list, but will still age mentally followed by physically, it is generally unavoidable. Having children makes you (ideally) mature with responsibility and you hold a position in your spawns life until you go to your grave. Add grandkids, great grandkids to the equation and you are going to keep moving further into the age abyss, responsible parenting sücks the life out of you and never ends, circle of life and all that. The only reason I brought this up is that lately I’ve noticed friends without kids seem to be aging at a slower rate, still more active and ambitious, just an observation.
 
#16
If you have children, you can do everything on the list, but will still age mentally followed by physically, it is generally unavoidable. Having children makes you (ideally) mature with responsibility and you hold a position in your spawns life until you go to your grave. Add grandkids, great grandkids to the equation and you are going to keep moving further into the age abyss, responsible parenting sücks the life out of you and never ends, circle of life and all that. The only reason I brought this up is that lately I’ve noticed friends without kids seem to be aging at a slower rate, still more active and ambitious, just an observation.
I have never married and never had children. This was a decision I made in 1967 at 14 and rarely regretted it.
 
#18
Unfortunately that won't be possible. He died a few years ago. His name was Keith Mason.
Oh yes. I remember Keith. Really good bloke much missed.
I wondered why you specified Fordingbridge as the rally has moved on.
It is the problem with growing old that people fall off the twig with increasing regulality, Three last year.
 
#19
If you have children, you can do everything on the list, but will still age mentally followed by physically, it is generally unavoidable. Having children makes you (ideally) mature with responsibility and you hold a position in your spawns life until you go to your grave. Add grandkids, great grandkids to the equation and you are going to keep moving further into the age abyss, responsible parenting sücks the life out of you and never ends, circle of life and all that. The only reason I brought this up is that lately I’ve noticed friends without kids seem to be aging at a slower rate, still more active and ambitious, just an observation.

That has a grain of truth in it.

However, I know a woman in her late 40s, she has 7 children - slim, vigorous, always smiling, runs her own business. Few other examples as well.
My cousin (of my age)- never had children, looks sad and fights for women's rights.
 
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#20
I've read most of a book called "Younger Next Year" aimed at people our age.
That's what got me motivated to lose weight & regain as much fitness as possible.
Lost nigh on 50lb in a year without making any big changes apart from reducing the beer consumption & walking a lot more.
50lb is really rather impressive.
 

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