Aftercare of deployed troops

#2
Psychiatric aftercare is pathetic in the British Forces, hell Psychiatric care in Iraq and Afghansitan is totally inadequate especially with whats happening out there now!!

After 16 AABde come back, watch and see more troops fall by the wayside as PTSD strikes and the MoD leave them to wallow in it without any help or backing! :evil:
 
#3
I'm sure a few of our friends on this thread will soon be outlining how recent initiatives are contributing to the ongoing psychiatric welfare of all (Reg and TA) troops returning from ops.
 
#4
dui-lai said:
Psychiatric aftercare is pathetic in the British Forces, hell Psychiatric care in Iraq and Afghansitan is totally inadequate especially with whats happening out there now!!

After 16 AABde come back, watch and see more troops fall by the wayside as PTSD strikes and the MoD leave them to wallow in it without any help or backing! :evil:
And what psychiatric support do think is currently deployed in Afghanistan in support of UK personnel? I've heard its quite robust and that all Comds are fully engaged in ensuring that the Post Op Stress Management plan is activated in keeping with the LANDSO. Troops are briefed before leaving Theatre on what to expect and what help is available if they are having difficulty coping after the Op.

Troops are undergoing decompression (with CPN support) and normalisation in barracks before going on POTL.

What additional support would you provide?
 
#5
I know this is needed, but is someone able to sort out the shirkers from those who are genuine :? :?
Otherwise its just going to be a waste of resources and the old leg pullers
will be in heaven :x
 
#6
neanderthal said:
dui-lai said:
Psychiatric aftercare is pathetic in the British Forces, hell Psychiatric care in Iraq and Afghansitan is totally inadequate especially with whats happening out there now!!

After 16 AABde come back, watch and see more troops fall by the wayside as PTSD strikes and the MoD leave them to wallow in it without any help or backing! :evil:
And what psychiatric support do think is currently deployed in Afghanistan in support of UK personnel? I've heard its quite robust and that all Comds are fully engaged in ensuring that the Post Op Stress Management plan is activated in keeping with the LANDSO. Troops are briefed before leaving Theatre on what to expect and what help is available if they are having difficulty coping after the Op.

Troops are undergoing decompression (with CPN support) and normalisation in barracks before going on POTL.

What additional support would you provide?
I don't know why you bother replying. He's just another know(feck)-all who enjoys gobbing off for the sake of it.
 
#7
Sky-Monkey said:
neanderthal said:
dui-lai said:
Psychiatric aftercare is pathetic in the British Forces, hell Psychiatric care in Iraq and Afghansitan is totally inadequate especially with whats happening out there now!!

After 16 AABde come back, watch and see more troops fall by the wayside as PTSD strikes and the MoD leave them to wallow in it without any help or backing! :evil:
And what psychiatric support do think is currently deployed in Afghanistan in support of UK personnel? I've heard its quite robust and that all Comds are fully engaged in ensuring that the Post Op Stress Management plan is activated in keeping with the LANDSO. Troops are briefed before leaving Theatre on what to expect and what help is available if they are having difficulty coping after the Op.

Troops are undergoing decompression (with CPN support) and normalisation in barracks before going on POTL.

What additional support would you provide?
I don't know why you bother replying. He's just another know(feck)-all who enjoys gobbing off for the sake of it.
I see, I've been nowhere and done feck-all and like the sound of my gob :roll:

I've seen first hand the Psych care on offer, its not the nurses fault but there is still this attitude about Psych care and counselling in the Army!

I know that after some numerous tours in both theatres, I have never been offered any and some of my friends who are Infantry/teeth arms have never been offered any either.

After this type of combat seen in Afghan, if the care on offer isn't adequate enough then we will see some very sad personal cases!

Neanderthal, what is needed is compulsory counselling, especially those exposed to combat and death. The attitude of the British Officer, especially Infantry/teeth arm to counselling is scandolous and treat it with contempt. If their reluctance to use this valuable assesst is not overcome, then the services will lose some very good soldiers
 
#8
dui-lai said:
I see, I've been nowhere and done feck-all and like the sound of my gob :roll:

I've seen first hand the Psych care on offer, its not the nurses fault but there is still this attitude about Psych care and counselling in the Army!

I know that after some numerous tours in both theatres, I have never been offered any and some of my friends who are Infantry/teeth arms have never been offered any either.

After this type of combat seen in Afghan, if the care on offer isn't adequate enough then we will see some very sad personal cases!

Neanderthal, what is needed is compulsory counselling, especially those exposed to combat and death. The attitude of the British Officer, especially Infantry/teeth arm to counselling is scandolous and treat it with contempt. If their reluctance to use this valuable assesst is not overcome, then the services will lose some very good soldiers
Totally agree with you there DL recent experiences with an individual going totally off the rails with the best case of PTSD I have ever heard and no support from his unit. Only came to light when he was in custody with the police.

Don't agree with the bit about friends in the infantry/teeth arms - You haven't got any friends have you? :twisted:
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#9
dui-lai said:
Psychiatric aftercare is pathetic in the British Forces, hell Psychiatric care in Iraq and Afghansitan is totally inadequate especially with whats happening out there now!!

After 16 AABde come back, watch and see more troops fall by the wayside as PTSD strikes and the MoD leave them to wallow in it without any help or backing! :evil:
Poo Boy has a point.

The majority of vagrants I come across are ex-forces and recount how 'well' the MoD have helped them. A good proportion of 'clients' I see, have military connections, again left to flounder in life's $hitpit. As the MoD have had their 'pound of flesh' but wont pay back in kind when the bloke has handed his MOD 90 in and he's out the barracks gate.

The MoD take no responsibility, but if you serve 20 years plus you will know and expect that. The MoD is like the ungrateful child when it's time they wont look after the ailing parent.

I shudder to think what will happen to the some of the serving soldierery that will come back the intense war-fighting they have endured in the Middle East. The QEMH and the majority of the military mental health units have gone and they are directed to the NHS that cant even provide care in the community, the kind of people I see every day running about. People who are obviously a danger to themselves and others.

No wonder so many ex-service personel end up in a box under Waterloo Bridge.
 
#10
There's some good evidence that formal interventional counselling is less effective in countering PTSD than informal social action. In other words, going out on the lash with some mates who went through the same sh*t you went through can help more than a professional shrink.

Not that that's an excuse. Knowledge of the warning signs of PTSD amongst SNCOs, WOs and Offrs is dire.

IF
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#11
My Chilwell experience was a 30 min chat from some RMN's who gave little info on procedures on return apart from "Go and see you JP!", who will little or no idea what you have done or seen and will punt you over to a NHS psychiatric unit which will understand even less.
 
#12
dui-lai said:
Neanderthal, what is needed is compulsory counselling, especially those exposed to combat and death. The attitude of the British Officer, especially Infantry/teeth arm to counselling is scandolous and treat it with contempt. If their reluctance to use this valuable assesst is not overcome, then the services will lose some very good soldiers

Mate without being rude
I served with 34 out in Sierra Leone
There was an RTA which, although in full drag the guys did what they could
but sadly the local guy who had been crushed by the UN landrover did'nt
make it.
Now my point is I was dragged back over to the hospital to make 80 feet of walkway or help carry him to the reefer. Now when it was decided that we would carry him the nurse Capt refused point blank to carry his head end as you could still see his face through the body bag (it was clear as there was no black ones and harry blacked shut as the heat ruined the glue holding the zip in place)Respect! 8O
So I big muggins had to carry the head end (and he was looking at you through the plastic) till we got him in a reefer. When we walked back on the ward the RQ was telling all the females "Well you've seen your first dead body does any one need counselling?"(Dunno why it was just the girls) :?
"What about me?" says I
"You'll be right." Says he.
Here endeth the debate about it done, dusted no more said and i just carry on.
My point is it has'nt affected me, luckily but some may say it has them
And the RQ in question was the blonde crusader from your very own RAMC
So its not just teeth arms who dont care but generally those above who are'nt educated about it enough
 
#13
Dui Lai

I wouldn't worry about sky monkey, I have looked through his/her posts and he/she swings wildly between reasonable and downright bone. He/she is probably looking for a bite and I wonder when he/she was last on ops?

Regards aftercare, we should be getting this right, the Army is launching a huge project on reserve mental health, I hope the Regulars get the same service.
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#14
invisiblehelper said:
Ventress, may I ask when you went through Chilwell?
From what you say it sounds like '03, just when things, MH connected, were just starting. Things have changed a little since then. If it was later I would be really interested to know as you should have been told much more!
Jun 03, prior to Telic 2. I hope things ahve improved in that time as 3 years ago it was the Psych help was abysmal.
 
#15
heart stopper said
So I big muggins had to carry the head end (and he was looking at you through the plastic)
Sounds like a good fair ground ride you soft swine. My daughter loves Thorpe Park. Never moans when she gets back in the house.
 
#16
Belated pennyworth....

Did you know that compulsory 'counselling' does untold harm.

In several good quality studies, the research seems to show that those who receive compulsory psychological debriefing end up more poorly on measures of depression, anxiety and general wellbeing which persists a long time after the intervention is conducted.

At best, it makes no difference........fact.

That is why the Surgeon General tells us not to do it.

It remains the duty of the soldier to identify that he is having a problem, the duty of the chain of command to react with compassion and the duty of the mental health services to react with professionalism and proper care. Sometimes this falls down at one of the three points.

To say, quite glibly that mental health care in the Forces is s**t is misrepresenting those of us who try our best to do a good job often in difficult circumstances.
 
#17
nurse_ratched said:
Belated pennyworth....

Did you know that compulsory 'counselling' does untold harm.

In several good quality studies, the research seems to show that those who receive compulsory psychological debriefing end up more poorly on measures of depression, anxiety and general wellbeing which persists a long time after the intervention is conducted.

At best, it makes no difference........fact.

That is why the Surgeon General tells us not to do it.

It remains the duty of the soldier to identify that he is having a problem, the duty of the chain of command to react with compassion and the duty of the mental health services to react with professionalism and proper care. Sometimes this falls down at one of the three points.

To say, quite glibly that mental health care in the Forces is s**t is misrepresenting those of us who try our best to do a good job often in difficult circumstances.
As something I studied for my dissertation, it isn't just 'several' it's every single well regarded and statistically valid study on post trauma, whether it be from miscarriage, RTA, military trauma, the lot.

Can as much as double your chances of having psychological sequelae. Even in the NHS it still gets offered if there's an incident on the ward. Good to see them squirm when you ask to see their evidence base!
 
#18
This was discussed a few months back on the TA board...

http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=32312.html

Nurse's comments about the system falling down on one the three areas is fair, but I know that in a number of cases, it's just falling on all three. Like a previous poster, I too share the concern of what the current Afghanistan op is going to sow if we haven't got this sorted out for those who return with problems.

As for being referred to your GP - I find the average GP has very little comprehension of the issues involved.
 
#20
nurse_ratched said:
It remains the duty of the soldier to identify that he is having a problem, the duty of the chain of command to react with compassion and the duty of the mental health services to react with professionalism and proper care. Sometimes this falls down at one of the three points.
Christ, what a recipe for disaster!
1) Most guys will not admit to a problem
2) The CoC even still today, shows no compassion
3) They are overstretched like all of us

All in all............. :evil:
 

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