African Infantryman of the Year

HSF

LE
Ok, I've been forced to look at some dodgy youtube videos. My browser history is not looking good. I've not seen any mention of being able to apply the safety after the AK is cocked, but this chap seems to be doing it, releasing it and then firing:-

It appears that I may have been doing the AK a bit of disservice and maybe it's not as basic as I thought.
The only defence that I can offer is that maybe our training team was a bit sniffy about it (this was in the days of THAT rifle) or the Chinese copy really was crap. I would be interested to hear from those that know and maybe bury 30 years of ignorance.
Very low teck but funcional.You can see how the safety could be moved by accident in yoiur maggot
 
Very low teck but funcional.You can see how the safety could be moved by accident in yoiur maggot
That anti-scratch trick wouldn't have worked on the AK47 that I owned in Saudi, which was fully - all of it - machined steel. A bit heavier than most of the things found around the world, but it was not going to break or bend. It was jewelry, and if I'd been able to get it back to the UK it would be worth many collector pennies. I gave it to mah buddy when ah left, together with the brand-new Browning 9mm ah acquired. The Norinco 9mm Browning copy I'd foolishly bought from a spiv was hopefully buried in the desert.
 

TamH70

MIA
That anti-scratch trick wouldn't have worked on the AK47 that I owned in Saudi, which was fully - all of it - machined steel. A bit heavier than most of the things found around the world, but it was not going to break or bend. It was jewelry, and if I'd been able to get it back to the UK it would be worth many collector pennies. I gave it to mah buddy when ah left, together with the brand-new Browning 9mm ah acquired. The Norinco 9mm Browning copy I'd foolishly bought from a spiv was hopefully buried in the desert.

Milled O.G. Russian AK47? It sounds like it must have been a Type 2. V. Nice. Extremely expensive in the States as every bastard wants one.

Here's a Gun Jesus video on it:

 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Only stripped one. We were introduced to them in a "know your enemy" sort of way, unfortunately no ammo available.
But I really cannot see how you could make one ready without knowing it.
I am sure you have more experience with them than myself.


ETA:- it was along time ago but I seem to recall that one of them was a Chinese copy. Are the change levers on these even more basic (if that's at all possible)?
Ok, I've been forced to look at some dodgy youtube videos. My browser history is not looking good. I've not seen any mention of being able to apply the safety after the AK is cocked, but this chap seems to be doing it, releasing it and then firing:-

It appears that I may have been doing the AK a bit of disservice and maybe it's not as basic as I thought.
The only defence that I can offer is that maybe our training team was a bit sniffy about it (this was in the days of THAT rifle) or the Chinese copy really was crap. I would be interested to hear from those that know and maybe bury 30 years of ignorance.
As the safety is part of the safety/selector lever, most stuff you're likely to find will be how to make them go Afrikaans.

The lever provides three functions, as the name indicates it allows the wpn to be set to safe, auto or semi, it blocks the bolt from coming back far enough to pick up a rd, (although enough to check the chamber,) and it acts as a dustcover for the bolt handle groove.

In the safe position it locks the trigger.
Some people have claimed that it's dangerous because there's no hammer safety, but as the hammer is held by the trigger which is blocked, in effect it freezes the hammer.
Any rifle worn enough for the hammer to release if dropped should be stuffed up the arse of the armourer whose job it is to ensure reliability.
That said, I've never heard of any AK or variant discharging if dropped, besides the DS solution is don't drop your fcuking rifle.

I've shot most 7.62 x 39 versions and a number of 74 types, they're all similar and all have their pecadillos.
The Romanian PM had a fwd pistol grip on the wooden forend, these were always scratched or work where they mixed it with the bottom of the magazine when changing mags, so those used by the Bn had that feature removed.

The Hungarian AMD had a similar problem with it's plastic fwd grip, but in general it's probably the most uncomfortable version of the to use with it's single wire folding stock and a muzzle report enhancer.
The only louder one I know is the AKSU with muzzle device removed.
At night...

I'm happy with most others, the Chinese Type 56 has no major failings, I guess it's personal choice.
 
Milled O.G. Russian AK47? It sounds like it must have been a Type 2. V. Nice. Extremely expensive in the States as every bastard wants one.

Here's a Gun Jesus video on it:

I only have one photo of it, and a poor one, but can't find it at the moment (wait out). A bit of Internet Research showed that it was most likely to have been made for the Poles in 1949. It had a folding butt. When I got it in 2003, it was still in cosmoline, and quite perfect in condition, as were the 2 accompanying magazines. It had never been cleaned up, let alone shot. How the hell it had come to be in Saudi in that condition after all that time escapes me, but the more recent history was decidedly murky, and I took it for $100. The chap who had it also had thousands of rounds of very old, very dodgy ammunition, made with Arabic stampings on the heads, which I declined (good, well-functioning gear was easily available at the time), and a gold-plated, pearl-handled thing clearly produced for a Saudi Princess. My mucker (who recently exposed himself in retirement as a CIA operative, the twat) got a 9mm Browning in brand-new condition, as did I, from him. Neither had ever been been used, and were very sticky to operate, needing some filing and wire-brushing to work properly.

Apologies for a Saudi dit in the A-I-O-T-Y thread.
 

TamH70

MIA
They were not the only milled AK's though.
True, but it won't have been an Eygptian gat, for instance. Their version, the Maadi rifle, was based on the AKM and that one was stamped.
 
Very low teck but funcional.You can see how the safety could be moved by accident in yoiur maggot

Also bearing in mind the first click down from Safe is full auto. Semi auto is a bit counter intuitive as it requires another click all the way down.
 
Also bearing in mind the first click down from Safe is full auto. Semi auto is a bit counter intuitive as it requires another click all the way down.
It was an article of faith for us during my time that this was because Russian soldiers were trained to spray and pray, but when the combat footage from Chechnya, Dagestan, etc. started to come out I saw a much more varied approach depending on situation, unit and morale, etc.

I later read that Kalashnikov had designed it as he did so that soldiers who're heavy-handed through the excitement of combat would be more likely to hit Repetition first off rather than waste ammo. That would certainly fit with the design philosophy of a lot of Soviet personal equipment - designed by clever people to be used by stupid ones.
 
Can't argue with that. LET410 another example. It has spoilers that pop up on the good side if it loses a donk so the farm boy tovarichi pilots hit the ground more or less wings level.
 

NSP

LE
It was an article of faith for us during my time that this was because Russian soldiers were trained to spray and pray, but when the combat footage from Chechnya, Dagestan, etc. started to come out I saw a much more varied approach depending on situation, unit and morale, etc.

I later read that Kalashnikov had designed it as he did so that soldiers who're heavy-handed through the excitement of combat would be more likely to hit Repetition first off rather than waste ammo. That would certainly fit with the design philosophy of a lot of Soviet personal equipment - designed by clever people to be used by stupid ones.
Also because Russia is very cold in winter and so squaddies wear thick gloves - and so are more likely to push the lever all the way down from impaired dexterity, even if intending the first stop, so semi-auto (the "safer" setting) came after full auto.
 
I later read that Kalashnikov had designed it as he did so that soldiers who're heavy-handed through the excitement of combat would be more likely to hit Repetition first off rather than waste ammo. That would certainly fit with the design philosophy of a lot of Soviet personal equipment - designed by clever people to be used by stupid ones.

I recall being "excited", as you put it, while using a small metal gun and being very surprised indeed to discover it was on auto. It was suggested that we get used to the idea of pushing all the way down then "up" one click in order to be sure of firing single shots. The Soviet design was more sensible, so far as the change-lever goes anyway.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
Just watched a documentary about the auxiliaries who were formed in 1921 to replace the tans. They had little leadership and were more or less left to themselves .
this lead to them wearing their revolver holsters slung low like a cowboy,
also to lots of cases of chaps shooting themselves in the foot . made I smile as they were mostly officers .
 
Just watched a documentary about the auxiliaries who were formed in 1921 to replace the tans. They had little leadership and were more or less left to themselves .
this lead to them wearing their revolver holsters slung low like a cowboy,
also to lots of cases of chaps shooting themselves in the foot . made I smile as they were mostly officers .
The Auxiliary Division of the RIC were formed in July 1920 four months after the Black and Tans. They were a paramilitary field force unit like the Support Unit of the BSAP in Rhodesia. They did not replace the Black and Tans whose role was to reinforce the reguar officers of the RIC.

They were formed into 100 man companies stationed around the main trouble spots of Ireland and their leaders were elected from within the company - usually ex majors or Captains with most of the rank and file being ex Lt's a large number of them having being comissioned from the ranks. They were all officers. I haven't heard about lots of them shooting themselves in the foot, although reading the IWOI thread there seem to have been a number of deaths in both the RIC and the British Army as a result of ND's.
 
It was an article of faith for us during my time that this was because Russian soldiers were trained to spray and pray, but when the combat footage from Chechnya, Dagestan, etc. started to come out I saw a much more varied approach depending on situation, unit and morale, etc.

I later read that Kalashnikov had designed it as he did so that soldiers who're heavy-handed through the excitement of combat would be more likely to hit Repetition first off rather than waste ammo. That would certainly fit with the design philosophy of a lot of Soviet personal equipment - designed by clever people to be used by stupid ones.
The AK was designed as part of a set of weapons all using the same intermediate cartridge. The SKS was to be the standard infantry carbine while the RPD was the light machine gun.

The AK was to be the submachine gun. Keep in mind that the Soviets issued SMGs more widely than was the practice in Western countries. They saw them as weapons intended to provide fire superiority in the final phases of an assault. This is the reason they had picked the 7.62 x 25mm pistol cartridge as their standard SMG round (and so used in their pistol as well), it gave a bit better range than 9mm. During the trials in which the AK took part the PPSh-41 SMG was included for comparison purposes because that was the weapon the that the AK (among other entrants) would be replacing.

There is known to have been a requirements document, but I'm not aware of anyone who has been able to find it. It seems reasonable however to assume that if the AK was supposed to be an SMG then the primary mode of fire was intended to be full automatic, which may have possibly influenced making "auto" the first selector position. This is speculation on my part however, and the early prototypes of the AK actually had separate small safety and auto selectors on the left side above and ahead of the trigger.

Some time later after acceptance, it was decided to make the AK the standard rifle rather than just an SMG, so the SKS was retired from front line service and everyone got an AK. Again, I haven't seen any one able to cite primary source documents on why this decision was made.

While it may seem obvious to us now that everyone should be given an "assault rifle" (or "avtomat" in Russian terms), that wasn't obvious in the 1940s when this design work was going on. It was it seems only later that someone asked why they needed two different weapons when one could do both jobs.
 
JAS terror group in Nigeria

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Members of the South African Defence Force patrol their area in Alexandra township, Johannesburg:

SADF.jpg


It looks as though the lad at the front has even eaten his boot polish. His mates are 'socially distancing' to avoid being eaten by him as well.
 

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