Afghanistans hidden toll: Troops invalided out triple

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Skynet, Aug 30, 2009.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Afghanistan's hidden toll: Troops invalided out triple in three years
    Unpublished figures show thousands of ex-soldiers have sought financial help – many suffering with stress disorders. Brian Brady and Nina Lakhani report

    Sunday, 30 August 2009SHARE PRINTEMAILTEXT SIZE
    The numbers of 'post-service' claims has risen by a factor of almost 100, from 15 to 1,455 since 2005

    At its bloodiest, the fighting around Sangin in Afghanistan's Helmand Province, has been likened to Rorke's Drift, the 1879 battle portrayed in the film Zulu. The military discourage the comparison but as one officer puts it: "The only difference is there are no Zulus at Sangin."

    The town has seen some of the deadliest fighting of the campaign. More British soldiers have been killed there and more medals won than anywhere else in Afghanistan. But the benefits the British troops have brought are seized on by officials, including decreased opium production and more Afghans being educated. But the benefits have come at a price, not all of which are as obvious as the monuments to the fallen British soldiers erected by their comrades.

    Shortages of helicopters and surveillance equipment mean troops are only as safe as far as they can see with their rifle sights or binoculars. The Taliban also know it and are careful to lay their lethal mines and improvised explosive devices just out of sight. Soldiers work on the basis that every time they patrol there is a one in four chance one of them will die. Privately, senior British officers say they currently work on the assumption at least a "limb a day" will be lost.

    Related articles
    Gordon Brown makes surprise visit to rally forces in Helmand
    James Fergusson: Peace with the Taliban: It is possible
    Former senior Army officer: 'MoD must help with care of veterans'
    The hidden costs of war
    The tally of dead currently stands at 208, but some senior officers believe this could rise sharply. The numbers of those wounded and maimed have soared by 300 per cent in the past three years as the increasingly bloody struggle to maintain order has intensified. New figures obtained by The Independent on Sunday also show that the numbers claiming compensation for injuries sustained in Iraq and Afghanistan are more than 12 times higher than the total in 2005.
  2. This would be a good time to push for public funding of service charities.