Afghanistan - What did we actually gain?

#1
Apart from clocking up hundreds of thousands of OSM's and dishing them out to the fellas as well as a lot of bravery awards etc, what have we gained from being in that sh*t hole?

I can kind of see it inspired these dopey twats to run off to Syria and heroically fight alongside the Kurds against ISIS and supposed extremism aside from having no military experiance and entering into a dangerous state of affairs with regards to inspiring potentially more extremism against the UK and NATO allies.

It's still a poor corrupt sh*t hole and the Taliban are running amok giving the ANA and ANP hell with the limited support we've now left and billions spent on foreign aid.

It almost leaves me thinking that rather than thinking we could match them on man on man and deployed more and along with allies just totally smashed them up and foreign policy changes with regards to requiring us to PID and concentrating more on the diplomacy side, nothing worked in our favour, tomorrow some tom from Syria will do something a bit more serious and we'll all be recieving our mob orders?

So perhaps Syria next?
 
#3
Good training?
 
#6
Had we gone in full-team, engineers building stuff, making life better for the people, providing internet and digital tvs all over, and not going into Iraq at the same time but dedicating the resources to rooting out the anti-western elements and bringing the rest over to a favourable view of the West we might have had a slightly better than even chance of getting a result.
But after 9/11 Afghan was more symbolic and Iraq had oil when it should have been the other way round.

As always the PBI pays for our politicians follies, conceits and enrichment.
 
#8
Look back at the history of this country, it has often poked its nose in where it wasn't wanted and left blood in the ground, but returned with little treasure. The only real geopolitical value was maintaining our strategic alliances, including Article 5 NATO pledges, but even that may be tested again before too long. Along with the numerous gongs exchanged for crown services rendered, we are yet to see the real legacy of that conflict era of HERRICK / TELIC and perhaps it will be a generation hence, but it will not be pretty. A rising Iran, a fragmented MENA, and a damaged if not broken Europe.

Whilst much Gucci kit was eventually provided for the battlefield, a lot more developments took place in the medical field, which has had wider implications, from emergency medicine to prosthetic limbs and rehabilitation programmes. Much of this has also had a positive impact for civilians in other areas too, such as disability sports. So perhaps the outputs were not the intended consequences, and frankly nothing from either campaign has been, but we cannot carp that we haven't profited in previous campaigns. We've been playing these games for many centuries and as always the bankers and the Defence industry are the only real beneficiaries. The critical masses still deliver their mass of criticism to government, irrespective of the military sacrifice and as with all wars the charitable sector picks up the pieces, whether its RBL, H4H, MSF or the ICRC.
 
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#9
Personally, a bit of bling, some memories both bad and good, and the ability to speak bad Pashto. Aside from that, not much. History will judge the rest.
 
#10
And we did eventually get rid of a bothersome, mendacious (is there any other kind?) sleazy lawyer.
 
#11
#12
20/20 hindsight, again?
 
#15
I was told in no uncertain terms that "It's all about the oil man! You're so naive." Wake up sheeple, have I learnt nothing from Iraq. etc. etc.
I guess so, I mean the bearded illiterate bigots of Saudi have shedloads so it stands to reason that all the muslim version of hillbillies have it. We'll be seeing the riches flooding in soon no doubt.

But seriously. As to whether we've made Afghanistan's situation any better, either short or long term - I'll leave it to those who've actually served and know the place.
 
#16
Look back at the history of this country, it has often poked its nose in where it wasn't wanted and left blood in the ground, but returned with little treasure.
Never been to the British Museum but was watching a Irish standup comedian's DVD the other day, there is nothing British in the British Museum it's all robbed (nothing worth robbing from us).

:)
 
#17
Personally, a bit of bling, some memories both bad and good, and the ability to speak bad Pashto. Aside from that, not much. History will judge the rest.
Whilst adventure, experience, memories and a bit of bling is what we crave as young squaddies, I was appalled when my kids craved the same thing.

Same as it ever was.
 
#18
You should probably run a cost benefit analysis over that
I would rather form a firing squad and start executing lawyers (excluding my daughter who is a lawyer, but who was so sickened by the greed and mendacity of lawyers in general that she works as a legal advisor to a large corporation, rather than a law firm.)
 
#19
I was told in no uncertain terms that "It's all about the oil man! You're so naive." Wake up sheeple, have I learnt nothing from Iraq. etc. etc.
I guess so, I mean the bearded illiterate bigots of Saudi have shedloads so it stands to reason that all the muslim version of hillbillies have it. We'll be seeing the riches flooding in soon no doubt.

But seriously. As to whether we've made Afghanistan's situation any better, either short or long term - I'll leave it to those who've actually served and know the place.
We could have made the Afghan situation better if we hadn't gone in half heartedly (politically I mean) and with a proper plan both for sorting some things out and for improving the situation of the people in terms of education, agriculture, water supply, communications, medical services etc etc. The intervention needed at least a twenty year plan* with corresponding budgets. What we got was a politician masturbating over his ability to order the military to march up the hill and down again.

*However our politicians are limited to short term thinking and we no longer have people with the ability to see the big picture.
 
#20
We could have made the Afghan situation better if we hadn't gone in half heartedly (politically I mean) and with a proper plan both for sorting some things out and for improving the situation of the people in terms of education, agriculture, water supply, communications, medical services etc etc. The intervention needed at least a twenty year plan* with corresponding budgets. What we got was a politician masturbating over his ability to order the military to march up the hill and down again.

*However our politicians are limited to short term thinking and we no longer have people with the ability to see the big picture.
Relearning past lessons learnt

Can't do any of that which requires security first, which means more combat troops
 

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