Afghanistan - The Legacy in Britain

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
TBF the old Terminal Grant [which back in the day,was set at 3 X Annual Pension entitlement]- was designed to cover exactly that.

I am out of date on current pension provision and entitlement - @hackle may be able to comment on this aspect.

There was also something called an Assisted House Purchase Loan (AHPL) under which folks could draw down a chunk for a deposit on a Property .

It would be interesting to burrow into the detail of the York University study of London homeless to find how many of those with a validated Service background had served long enough to be pensionable.


Which leaves the majority of guys, who served 2-10 years, with only their own resources to fall back on.

That's where the gap is to be found I suspect.
 
First-hand testimony of all the minor triumphs and major fúck-ups ordinary guys and gals from ordinary British towns and cities saw in alien places like Nad-e-ali, Lash and Kajaki.
You'll need someone like Ken Wharton to do this. He has written a number of books on Op Banner, mostly from material collected by blokes who were there but backed up by personal experience and a lot of research. I hope you can find someone to do the subject justice...

Ken Wharton - soldier and writer
Could I suggest, that we have everything we need right here?

"In Their Own Words - Afghanistan - by The Soldiers of Arrse"

Those that were there, supply the stories, photographs and anecdotes.

The old and bold help collate, proof read etc. @Auld-Yin can review it all, @Good CO and @Bad CO issue re-writes.

With so many avid historians and readers, it wouldn't surprise me if we didn't have contacts in printing and publishing?

All proceeds to Arrse, Combat Stress, A N Other Military Charity?

And all back home for tea and medals! Does this have legs? Pro's, Con's and an adult to start a separate thread if it starts rolling.
 

slick

LE
Could I suggest, that we have everything we need right here?

"In Their Own Words - Afghanistan - by The Soldiers of Arrse"

With so many avid historians and readers, it wouldn't surprise me if we didn't have contacts in printing and publishing?
Self publishing/print on demand might be an idea, no upfront charges. I would suggest Lulu.com but they seem to be having major problems after an upgrade. Amazon KDP might be worth a look for such a project....
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Could I suggest, that we have everything we need right here?

"In Their Own Words - Afghanistan - by The Soldiers of Arrse"
Bang goes my OU History thesis - demn your eyes Sah !
 
I was thinking more along the line of encouraging more saving so that a guy within sight of his exit has funds to put down for a house, instead of coming out with nothing to show for it except a ruined liver
It is a life choice. It is the individual who needs to make the decision. I got the Pay Officer to talk to my Sqn before Bosnia in 95 , trying to get them to understand this was a great time to save for their future. Four months in Sarajevo followed by 2 weeks in camp the 4 weeks leave. On their return asking them what they had done , what did the have left etc. One Cpl had bought an American V8 truck , another he pissed it up against a wall but did have an electric razor ? .

The old proverb “You can take a horse to water”.

Had another retiring SSgt from Glasgow. Apart from stealing all the office supplies , pens, paper etc it’s for my kids. ( He never knew we took all the ink inserts from the biros and changed the A4 paper for the cut up maps from the map section. )

22 years served , nothing to show for it and his life plan was to get a council house. This was in 96 and I think things have changed But he left saying I’ll no be getting out of bed for less than 25,000 a year.
 

Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
It is a life choice. It is the individual who needs to make the decision. I got the Pay Officer to talk to my Sqn before Bosnia in 95 , trying to get them to understand this was a great time to save for their future. Four months in Sarajevo followed by 2 weeks in camp the 4 weeks leave. On their return asking them what they had done , what did the have left etc. One Cpl had bought an American V8 truck , another he pissed it up against a wall but did have an electric razor ? .

The old proverb “You can take a horse to water”.

Had another retiring SSgt from Glasgow. Apart from stealing all the office supplies , pens, paper etc it’s for my kids. ( He never knew we took all the ink inserts from the biros and changed the A4 paper for the cut up maps from the map section. )

22 years served , nothing to show for it and his life plan was to get a council house. This was in 96 and I think things have changed But he left saying I’ll no be getting out of bed for less than 25,000 a year.
Old Bloke - I agree,

I can share similar unfortunate tales, especially during my 2 years as a Unit Welfare Officer (UWO) in Colchester circa 2006/7.

I would have soldiers coming to my office to commence certain processes of leaving the army having made almost zero preparations for their future housing. Not so bad for the singlies, but almost heartbreaking when it was a married bloke in the office with wife and kinder in tow.

When not heartbreaking I was more often simply hacked off with their utter lack of effort. 'You knew 22 years ago that this date would arrive that you would be leaving (or 5 years, 12 years etc) so why did you not do anything"? Answers were always pretty lame.

Although I understand the sentiment that the previous poster Stovepipe alludes to; the Army can and should only do so much. My brother and sister are civvies, they received the sum total of zero lectures/lessons/pamphlets/advice on house purchase for their future. They had to act like adults and sort it out themselves.

I do have sympathy in some cases but the onus must rest on the individual to prepare for a date writ large in his diary or head on the day he has to hand back his Mil accommodation. Fortunately they were the minority not the majority and I do not mean to come across as uncaring.
 
Could I suggest, that we have everything we need right here?

"In Their Own Words - Afghanistan - by The Soldiers of Arrse"

Those that were there, supply the stories, photographs and anecdotes.

The old and bold help collate, proof read etc. @Auld-Yin can review it all, @Good CO and @Bad CO issue re-writes.

With so many avid historians and readers, it wouldn't surprise me if we didn't have contacts in printing and publishing?

All proceeds to Arrse, Combat Stress, A N Other Military Charity?

And all back home for tea and medals! Does this have legs? Pro's, Con's and an adult to start a separate thread if it starts rolling.
Bump....
 
I have a whole bunch of mates from the TA who went out to Iraq on the invasion in 2003. Most are having problems now, some of them have talked to me about it at mess functions and reunions. Different war, same old sh*t...

How many went through Afgan and Iraq? I'd hate to guess...
A point worth making about the TA lads and lasses-
A regular soldier will come home from a tour and will, after POTL, go back to his/ her unit with the people that they served with. They have the shared experience right down to incidents, people, locations, humour, good days and bad days.

The TA folks (I use TA rather than Reserve because it was the TA that went to Iraq and Afghanistan) simply didn't have that 'benefit'. They went back to the same office, factory, site that they left 10 months before. They didn't, and don't, have that support network.

I experienced this to some extent, I returned to the office to indifferent management and a range of attitudes from 'how many people did you kill' to 'if there's anything you want to talk about...'
I never suffered any real problems, but I did wonder how it was for others. I can see this as a key problem and it may explain why reservists can be more prone to PTSD problems.
 

Latest Threads

Top