Afghanistan - Deafness the "new" scourge of returnees

#3
I actually have a recorded hearing loss on my final medical, which was straight after a telic tour. Hasnt stopped me in my current job, YET, but Ive had trouble getting through the medicals.

I was expecting to see something like this in the press sooner or later, comes as no surprise really. No shock that the numbers are high in the infantry battalions.

Once the damage is done to hearing it is permanent and cant be recovered im led to beleive. Not sure what the solution could be to prevent this, thinking about the practicallity of it. Not very tactical wearing them big mickey mouse ear defs on patrol or top cover, or even them foam ear plugs.

Surprised the Army havent looked into something though. Or have they? My current employer issues moulded ear plugs that have a small hole in the centre. They soften the blow of loud noises but allow you to still hear what is going on and able to ear what people are saying too. They're a hell of a lot better than the foam ear plugs. Any one else used them?
 
#4
Electronic filtering earplugs have been available for decades - they are lightweight, you can hear a full range of ambient sound, yet they instantly cut out gunshots and other sound spikes.

I assume the Treasury has always found it cheaper to get rid of hearing-impaired soldiers than buy adequate protection.
 
#6
They trying to tell us Hearing loss is a new thing in the army? If your not deaf not suffering with hissing peeping or rattling in your ears or cant concentate on anything or get confused and regular headaches, then you Obviously havent served in the army no matter in peace or War Everyone suffers some kind of hearing abuse, even if its ye room mate who listens to Westlife or something.... and if he does you may wanna clamp your arrse :eek:
 
#7
We have whole lectures on veteran hearing problems and management, and how to advice on compensation as well as to spot a fraudulent claim
 
#8
wompingwillow said:
We have whole lectures on veteran hearing problems and management, and how to advice on compensation as well as to spot a fraudulent claim
So youre the one who only gave me £1500 and said I had under 20% hearing loss in the left ear are you? I remember in 1988 attending a hearing panel after a piss poor performance in the audio chamber coudn't hear those blasted beeps all the others being assesed were Korea or Normandy vets!
 
#9
walting_matilda said:
Pardon........................
LMAO :roll: how witty and funny.
 
#10
4(T) said:
Electronic filtering earplugs have been available for decades - they are lightweight, you can hear a full range of ambient sound, yet they instantly cut out gunshots and other sound spikes.

I assume the Treasury has always found it cheaper to get rid of hearing-impaired soldiers than buy adequate protection.
US SF gets issued these electronic ear defenders that do just that, they can also plug into comm's kit for use as headsets.

They cost £200 a pop, surely a small price to pay considering the amount the MOD are having to shell out in compensation?
 
#13
Is this complete hearing loss or purely in the right ear? If that's the case then an ear defence like wompingwillow suggested could be used in the right ear alone. This would stop hearing loss but keep the left ear open for using comm and the right ear is still able to be used for finding fire locations.

An idea, or been tried before but binned?
 
#14
Whiskey_60 said:
4(T) said:
Electronic filtering earplugs have been available for decades - they are lightweight, you can hear a full range of ambient sound, yet they instantly cut out gunshots and other sound spikes.

I assume the Treasury has always found it cheaper to get rid of hearing-impaired soldiers than buy adequate protection.
US SF gets issued these electronic ear defenders that do just that, they can also plug into comm's kit for use as headsets.

They cost £200 a pop, surely a small price to pay considering the amount the MOD are having to shell out in compensation?
From the few cases I know of, they are very tight with there compensation. Was a lad in my first troop i joined out of training who got fcuk all apart from discharged.

Surprisingly enough the MOD will blame it on anything they can to try and wrangle out of paying up. The same old excuses come out - ear defence was provided blah blah....

Be interesting to see how they try to talk there way out of more recent cases.
 
#15
What does health and safety law say? Surely if the ear defenders and foam plugs aren't fit for purpose (because you can't hear orders when you're wearing them) then the MOD should provide better ones.
 
#16
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
Is this complete hearing loss or purely in the right ear? If that's the case then an ear defence like wompingwillow suggested could be used in the right ear alone. This would stop hearing loss but keep the left ear open for using comm and the right ear is still able to be used for finding fire locations.

An idea, or been tried before but binned?
I think thats a no go mate. On ranges its compulsory to wear ear defence.

However on tour during a contact your not usually the only one putting rounds down, so just having one ear defended on your firing side wouldnt really work IMO. Also IDF and fast air doing fly overs etc etc. No point in just covering one ear.
 
#17
#18
#19
RIGRAT said:
I think thats a no go mate. On ranges its compulsory to wear ear defence.

However on tour during a contact your not usually the only one putting rounds down, so just having one ear defended on your firing side wouldnt really work IMO. Also IDF and fast air doing fly overs etc etc. No point in just covering one ear.
It was on ex/ops i was thinking of, the only ear problems i have is in the right since that side of the head is flush with the rifle. Never any problems with the left even with gpmgs doing their thing next to me. Though if CAS is inbound you can pop the left one in, i know a few guys who do that with both ears at the moment.
 
#20
I've got two reusable rubber earplugs bought from homebase tied to the loop on the neck of my smock with green string, so I can pull them out without losing them, and put them back in fairly quickly. It's the best I've thought of so far, but it isn't perfect, and neither is my hearing. The amplivox are useless for anything involving a helmet; impossible to move off your ear properly, and far too hot and sweaty in summer.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top