Afghan Interpreters - let them in the UK? (Poll)

Should Afghans who worked for the British be allowed to live in the UK?

  • Yes - they risked their lives for us - let them, and their families in

    Votes: 58 32.8%
  • Maybe - those who can prove intimidation should be allowed to the UK

    Votes: 28 15.8%
  • No - give them support to stay and build up their own Country

    Votes: 28 15.8%
  • No - they knew the risks, took the money, and are trying it on via UK Lawyers and gullible Brits

    Votes: 63 35.6%

  • Total voters
    177
#21
They have the right of asylum as set down in international law. If there is a case to prove that their human rights are jeopardised they should be supported in putting their case forward to the relevant Tribunal or Commission (in whatever safe country they choose).

If they have a case which is proved through a Judicial process then they get in. No need to set a precedent for every Terp and his family just because of the nature of his job, because individual cases should be tested independently. It may be more relevant to look at how a body such as the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (who could sit in relative isolation to protect applicants) could provide something like a 2 year surge in sittings to allow the spike in Afghan Terp cases to be reviewed in a timely manner, and organise the logistics to house or return applicants.

We basically have zero chance of attempting to stem an increase in applicants, but we have a choice on how proactive we can be in settling/returning them and doing the right thing by everyone (except the racists for whom I imagine there is no answer short of '**** em').
 
#22
I'm sure the ANSF and some of the ANP are also at risk from retribution from the taliban. As well as every Afghan who has had dealings with ISAF whether performing deliveries, labourers working in FOBs/Bastion or government officials.

Shall we let all those in as well?

Let's just vacate the UK and hand it over to every **** who has worked for the military in one capacity or another.
Plenty of Germans settled here after WW2 and AFAIK they were on t'other side. Plenty of Poles & Czechs settled here too. My grandad among them. Most of their descendants have turned out to be decent enough citizens.

It should be decided on merit and true risk. A blanket approach either way is ridiculous.

I don't see how you can deny all of these people the chance when the doors remain open to every Tom, Dick and Hari from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Somalia, Nigeria etc. UKIP bang on about European immigration yet nothng they advocate will stop any of the nut jobs getting in through the asylum seeker or Commonwealth backdoors.
 
S

syledis

Guest
#26
It would be interesting if we could differentiate in the vote who served over there with them and who didnt.
 
#27
I would quite happily let them in and if overcrowding is an issue make space by kicking out some of the bogus asylum / illegals that are here already.

No matter what economic argument you may well put on the case for now, most of us know that once we and the rest have pulled out there will be retribution inflicted on those deemed collaborators, happens in every conflict.


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#28
The problem with the \they knew what they were getting into' angle is that perhaps they believed it when the UK said that there would be no twitching of the rug, running for the exits etc, and that 'we' would be there as long as necessary to bring about a stable society. Now that they've twigged that we're going to declare a victory and leg it, leaving Afghanistan to its fate, they might feel a bit short-changed.

Mind you, if they're stupid enough to believe British government pledges then perhaps we don't want them here after all.
 
#29
You could compare it to the Policemen/women in Northern Ireland. Go to work every day and face up to being killed in their line of work. You could then also say they would suffer intimidation when at home. But they still recruit easily enough and live close to where they work. Look at the Afghan's and they are under threat obviously "at work" but as mentioned they live the other end of the country which doesnt have the same communication infrastructure to spread the word of what they do. I say and voted, if they are being intimidated and prove it then let them. But i have a feeling this wont be robustly adhered to and they will flood in.
 
#30
But then again the uk populence keeps voting for the er "challenged" so not exactly the brightest and the best here.
Indivdual cases considering they did work for us and at least the early ones thought we might be able to sort afghanistan out.
Has to count for more than I got some tart pregant and even though I dont see the kid its my human rights to have a family life grr:(
You can still not see the kid in somalia
 
#31
I retired from the Army a long time ago, never served in Afghanistan (respect those who did and are). I strongly believe we have a moral obligation to allow those interpreters who work so loyally and courageously for us to be given asylum in the UK - after stringent vetting - before the general pull-out.
 
#32
BLUF: Several thousand Afghans, once employed by the Army, want to come to the UK, along with their extended families.

Those who have served in Afghanistan or Iraq will probably have met, and maybe worked alongside, Afghans employed by us. These are mostly interpreters, with others carrying out a range of duties, from radio broadcaster to medical assistant to emptying wastepaper bins.

The History Bit:
In Iraq, as TELIC drew down it was clear that some Iraqis who worked for us would find themselves in the shit once we left. A scheme was developed to enable them to stay in Iraq, but to relocate - they were given money to stay. Not long afterwards, many decided that this was not for them, and that they needed to leave Iraq entirely - they were then granted the right to asylum in the UK, and many took advantage of this scheme (keeping the money they'd been given to relocate, of course).

For HERRICK, some lessons of Iraq were taken on board. The main one of these was that all LECs were to be recruited in Kabul, many hundreds of miles from where they would work, reducing the chances of any intimidation to a minimum. This system worked, and over the last few years several thousand Afghans have worked for the UK Forces; sadly several have been killed, and many others have suffered a variety of injuries (and all were compensated for this). That said there has never been a shortage of willing recruits (without any advertising) and they have been well paid (around the same as an ANA Brigadier, and many, many times what an ANA/ANP/ALP recruit would receive. AFAIK, only a handful has claimed any form of intimidation, and of those only one or two have got a genuine case.

Now, move to drawdown time. The UK's line is that those who worked for us should stay in Afghanistan and work to build their Country. This view is not necessarily shared by others; for example, the US are letting a few into the USA at a time. But this isn't about our allies - it's about what we do, the UK plc, with these men (there are one or two women, but 99.9% are male) when they claim that they are suffering as a result of being employed by us, and want us to do something about it.

There is already a campaign to the effect that these brave men and their families must be allowed into the UK, and that we owe that to them for risking their lives for us. This tugs at the heartstrings (and also at the purse strings). Expect this to increase over the next few months, as lawyers and human Rights groups get behind this campaign.

So, Ladies and Gentlemen of ARRSE, the question is this: should the default be that these men, and their families, be allowed to come to the UK, or should they be helped to stay on in their own country? You can probably tell which way I lean on this matter - I think they are, with a very few worthy exceptions, a bunch of chancers out to make as much as they can, then abandon their own country and heritage for the chance to make even more dosh elsewhere.

For:
- They've put their lives on the line

Against:
- They've been paid a VERY good wage, knew the risks, and took the money with their eyes open.
- They did NOT do this for love of the UK HM Queen, etc. They did it for the money. They would have preferred to work for the Yanks (who paid more) anyway.
- They have NO loyalty or even liking for the UK. Most will use UK asylum to move to Canada, USA, etc.
- They were all recruited from Kabul, far far away from Helmand, thus reducing the intimidation risk.
- There have been very few (under 10) claims of intimidation thus far, so is there a genuine problem?
- We are talking of probably over 5,000 people, plus their families, so over 30,000 in total is quite possible. That’s a lot of Afghans – even if most of the Males do at least speak English!
YOU don't know what you're talking about, never mind you preaching to anyone else. My terp for H17 was recruited in Kandahar, shot while working for BRF on H13,received death threats while recuperating, suffered his brother being assassinated in his place and was eventually moved from the TFH AO.He has received several commendations from the different units and nations he has assisted. He has no interest in any other nation other than the UK,if he can work for us forever he would. Some on here probably know him.
If he's not a genuine case for entry to the UK, given his and his family's sacrifice, I don't know who is.



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#33
I worked very closely with several terps and they are indeed a mixed bag.

One was recommended for some sort of award for bravery. One had superb language skills. On my EOT to Bastion I went into the LSU and told them how good they were. I'd have those two in the UK any day. In fact I'd even burn out a couple of chavs and let the terps have their houses. The terps have, after all, done more for this country than any dole scrounging work-shy local fucktard chav.

But I agree with other posters, each on his own merit and the parents can stay where they are.
 
#34
BLUF: Several thousand Afghans, once employed by the Army, want to come to the UK, along with their extended families.

Those who have served in Afghanistan or Iraq will probably have met, and maybe worked alongside, Afghans employed by us. These are mostly interpreters, with others carrying out a range of duties, from radio broadcaster to medical assistant to emptying wastepaper bins.

The History Bit:
In Iraq, as TELIC drew down it was clear that some Iraqis who worked for us would find themselves in the shit once we left. A scheme was developed to enable them to stay in Iraq, but to relocate - they were given money to stay. Not long afterwards, many decided that this was not for them, and that they needed to leave Iraq entirely - they were then granted the right to asylum in the UK, and many took advantage of this scheme (keeping the money they'd been given to relocate, of course).

For HERRICK, some lessons of Iraq were taken on board. The main one of these was that all LECs were to be recruited in Kabul, many hundreds of miles from where they would work, reducing the chances of any intimidation to a minimum. This system worked, and over the last few years several thousand Afghans have worked for the UK Forces; sadly several have been killed, and many others have suffered a variety of injuries (and all were compensated for this). That said there has never been a shortage of willing recruits (without any advertising) and they have been well paid (around the same as an ANA Brigadier, and many, many times what an ANA/ANP/ALP recruit would receive. AFAIK, only a handful has claimed any form of intimidation, and of those only one or two have got a genuine case.

Now, move to drawdown time. The UK's line is that those who worked for us should stay in Afghanistan and work to build their Country. This view is not necessarily shared by others; for example, the US are letting a few into the USA at a time. But this isn't about our allies - it's about what we do, the UK plc, with these men (there are one or two women, but 99.9% are male) when they claim that they are suffering as a result of being employed by us, and want us to do something about it.

There is already a campaign to the effect that these brave men and their families must be allowed into the UK, and that we owe that to them for risking their lives for us. This tugs at the heartstrings (and also at the purse strings). Expect this to increase over the next few months, as lawyers and human Rights groups get behind this campaign.

So, Ladies and Gentlemen of ARRSE, the question is this: should the default be that these men, and their families, be allowed to come to the UK, or should they be helped to stay on in their own country? You can probably tell which way I lean on this matter - I think they are, with a very few worthy exceptions, a bunch of chancers out to make as much as they can, then abandon their own country and heritage for the chance to make even more dosh elsewhere.

For:
- They've put their lives on the line

Against:
- They've been paid a VERY good wage, knew the risks, and took the money with their eyes open.
- They did NOT do this for love of the UK HM Queen, etc. They did it for the money. They would have preferred to work for the Yanks (who paid more) anyway.
- They have NO loyalty or even liking for the UK. Most will use UK asylum to move to Canada, USA, etc.
- They were all recruited from Kabul, far far away from Helmand, thus reducing the intimidation risk.
- There have been very few (under 10) claims of intimidation thus far, so is there a genuine problem?
- We are talking of probably over 5,000 people, plus their families, so over 30,000 in total is quite possible. That’s a lot of Afghans – even if most of the Males do at least speak English!
The saying goes trust an Afghan til your last $
 
#35
I'm sure the ANSF and some of the ANP are also at risk from retribution from the taliban. As well as every Afghan who has had dealings with ISAF whether performing deliveries, labourers working in FOBs/Bastion or government officials.

Shall we let all those in as well?
Let's just vacate the UK and hand it over to every **** who has worked for the military in one capacity or another.
I've worked with many of these Terps.
They have been educated and picked up all sorts of information over the years.
These could be the very people needed to help re-build their country.
But after helping us in varying degrees want to come over here and claim benefits.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#36
YOU don't know what you're talking about, never mind you preaching to anyone else. My terp for H17 was recruited in Kandahar, shot while working for BRF on H13,received death threats while recuperating, suffered his brother being assassinated in his place and was eventually moved from the TFH AO.He has received several commendations from the different units and nations he has assisted. He has no interest in any other nation other than the UK,if he can work for us forever he would. Some on here probably know him.
If he's not a genuine case for entry to the UK, given his and his family's sacrifice, I don't know who is.
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Sorry, but I know quite a lot (OK, a great deal) about this. But never mind. Your chap sounds like a true paragon, and would have no problems getting genuine asylum in the UK.

Oddly though I have not heard of any Terps recruited from Kandahar. Not those involved in Helmand, anyway.
 
#37
My post looks a bit rattier than I intended,apologies.
However, surely your statement that ALL terps were/are recruited from Kabul is inaccurate given that at least one (the bloke in my post) is from Kandahar and has worked for us from 2008?
His story is genuine, and in fact I left a lot out, as I compiled a "timeline of events" for his P File with the LEC bosses in Bastion.

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#38
The terps I worked with on H10 were excellent, completely different to my experience in BAS on T7/8. The Afghan terps I have no problem with coming to the UK. They have done something for this country thus, to me at least, have more 'right' to be here than hundreds of thousands of others. Except one, he was a dirty bummer.
I was on a recruiting stand not so long ago and a young bloke came up to us and started chatting, he had been a terp at Sangin, no doubt some on here would know him. Already terping on an ad-hoc basis for a council. He made a point of thanking us for our work over there, seemed like a good lad.
 
#39
Bit of an irrelevance really - given our lack of border control they'll come whether we say yes or not. I've met plenty of Afghan ex-pats in the UK who have got in & stayed quite easily, despite not strictly being allowed to (well, the UK bit was easy - the travel across Russia etc a bit trickier).
 
#40
- They did it for the money.
- They would have preferred to work for the Yanks
- They have NO loyalty or even liking for the UK
- Most will use UK asylum to move to Canada, USA, etc.
As far as I can tell, you've invented the above four points. In the absence of hard fact, I hope to **** we aren't going to make life/death decisions based on prejudiced assumptions.

If
there is a genuine threat to their lives, we should grant them asylum. Much as I dislike the idea of yet more 'diversity' in the UK, we can no more throw them to the wolves than shoot them ourselves.

That said, this is a very different situation from Iraq and, with the limited information that's available, I can't see a case for offering blanket asylum.
 

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