Afghan fighting - the latest reports.

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BBC's latest report (aug 01) is balanced, objective reporting for once (albeit with almost every point lifted off twitter)

Shows Taliban at Lashkargah's peace roundabout & Ismail Khan (short father christmas looking one) of Herat calling on anyone with a gun to come join the fight against the Taliban. No mention of Kandahar's damaged runway thought- maybe that's repaired?

This is an incredible ending to it all, but more amazing is the almost realtime, access all areas, battlefield reports and diplomatic exchanges we've got access to. I think Taliban & allies use of social media have made this the most accessible battlefield of all time. And I was there man (on twitter behind a keyboard, warrior-ing away)
its been repaired and reports of KAM Air etc resuming flights.

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Taliban has been taking significant casualties in recent days (perhaps the past two weeks) but show no signs of letting up. Makes you wonder how many of the buggers there are.
 
I can't vouch for the accuracy of the tweet but I can vouch for the propaganda value of a video claiming to be of the Taliban driving a tank 100-km North EAST of soon to be renamed Hamid Karzai International Airport

In my head bells are ringing like it was Coronation Day.

Casting my mind back to when the Soviet bear went 'over the mountain' I recall one documentary filmed by an intrepid Western camera team who embedded themselves with a Mujahaddin group who had indeed captured a Russian tank (T55, IIRC) and knew enough about how to operate and maintain it that they were able to surmount the difficulties of the rocky, mountainous terrain in their AO, and drive the fecker a considerable distance to where they could use it to support their comrades in arms against the thing's former owners.

It was a testament not only to the dedication, fortitude, improvisation and just-plain-stubborn endurance of the locals, but also, at the same time, to the rugged simplicity of the tank.
 
After just hearing a huge blast somewhere in the city centre reports on social media indicate a VBIED detonation and complex attack underway at the Minister for Defence’s house in Shar-e Now. So it begins in the capital.
 
In my head bells are ringing like it was Coronation Day.

Casting my mind back to when the Soviet bear went 'over the mountain' I recall one documentary filmed by an intrepid Western camera team who embedded themselves with a Mujahaddin group who had indeed captured a Russian tank (T55, IIRC) and knew enough about how to operate and maintain it that they were able to surmount the difficulties of the rocky, mountainous terrain in their AO, and drive the fecker a considerable distance to where they could use it to support their comrades in arms against the thing's former owners.

It was a testament not only to the dedication, fortitude, improvisation and just-plain-stubborn endurance of the locals, but also, at the same time, to the rugged simplicity of the tank.
I think that was the film by the late Nick Downie in the early eighties. He was one of the first westerners to film there in about 1981, He didn't seem very impressed by them.
 

Poppycock

War Hero
Casting my mind back to when the Soviet bear went 'over the mountain' I recall one documentary filmed by an intrepid Western camera team who embedded themselves with a Mujahaddin group who had indeed captured a Russian tank (T55, IIRC) and knew enough about how to operate and maintain it that they were able to surmount the difficulties of the rocky, mountainous terrain in their AO, and drive the fecker a considerable distance to where they could use it to support their comrades in arms against the thing's former owners.

It was a testament not only to the dedication, fortitude, improvisation and just-plain-stubborn endurance of the locals, but also, at the same time, to the rugged simplicity of the tank.
No tanks, but some heavy weapons being hiked up a hill in what I assume is the same documentary


I think that was the film by the late Nick Downie in the early eighties. He was one of the first westerners to film there in about 1981, He didn't seem very impressed by them.
Sorry to report (google told me) Nick Downie died from a Covid-related illness on May 12th, aged 74.

Medically trained but dropped out, sole civvie SAS applicant in a 120-person intake, & one of only 7 to pass

SAS & privateer in Oman before serving with the Kurdish Peshmerga during the Second Iraqi – Kurdish War (1974-75)

More here:
 

Poppycock

War Hero
I think that was the film by the late Nick Downie in the early eighties. He was one of the first westerners to film there in about 1981, He didn't seem very impressed by them.
Ex-SAS adventure / mercenary turned 'journalist' Nick Downie said in his 1980 documentary (at 8mins 5secs) that the resistance was not, definitely not, receiving any foreign support

CIA's Operation Cyclone funding to the Afghan resistance in 1980 was $20-to-$30-million (according to wiki) :-D

 
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Poppycock

War Hero
I think that was the film by the late Nick Downie in the early eighties. He was one of the first westerners to film there in about 1981, He didn't seem very impressed by them
I guess that's the tribal disunity he talks about & is seen in the video, which is a gem of a find

I've linked it to a point that I think explains the Taliban's white flag - they say a white flag means they don't belong to any of the political factions

 
Yes, looks like a re-run of South Viet Nam.
And no doubt in 20 years' time we will have the usual suspects telling us how we actually won in Afghanistan, how the Allies lost no significant battle and how the Afghan government would have beaten the Taliban if only they hadn't been "betrayed" by peaceniks in the west.

This is what defeat looks like, it's pretty similar to what it looked like in Saigon in 1975 in case anyone is still unsure as to who won and lost that particular war.
 
This is what defeat looks like, it's pretty similar to what it looked like in Saigon in 1975 in case anyone is still unsure as to who won and lost that particular war.
The Americans might have lost strategically but they won the economic war. After 1975 they launched economic sanctions against Vietnam. After their Soviet sugar daddy collapsed the Vietnamese economy tanked. In the early nineties they were one of the poorest countries in the world until Clinton lifted sanctions.

Who will be Afghanistans new sugar daddy when the west pulls out and the Taliban take over. I don't think China will be keen to pour in money unless there is a lot in it for them.

It makes you wonder who is bank rolling the Talibans offensive at the moment. It must cost a lot of money. Is it still the Pakistani ISI?
 
After just hearing a huge blast somewhere in the city centre reports on social media indicate a VBIED detonation and complex attack underway at the Minister for Defence’s house in Shar-e Now. So it begins in the capital.
There's been a bit in the city in the last month or so, hopefully this isn't an escalation. I'd like to leave in an orderly fashion (Emirates) rather than be bundled onto a C130 with just a daysack in the middle of the night. I'm in my last 3 weeks and I doubt I'll be back after this rotation.
 
I'd like to leave in an orderly fashion (Emirates) rather than be bundled onto a C130 with just a daysack in the middle of the night. I'm in my last 3 weeks and I doubt I'll be back after this rotation.
Same here, I have 6 weeks to push and that's me done, but i'm not confident that the extraction plan (if there actually is one) for the contract I'm on is viable. Do you want to go halfers on a über?
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Best of luck you two.
I was in Afghanistan very early on, before the initial surge. It sounds like it's reverting to those times, I suppose that particular Leopard really can't change it's spots.
 
Best of luck you two.
I was in Afghanistan very early on, before the initial surge. It sounds like it's reverting to those times, I suppose that particular Leopard really can't change it's spots.
Thanks mate. I've been here for 10 years (I must be ******* mad) and though this isn't the worst it's been by far there's certainly a sense that it's going to escalate rapidly.
 
The Americans might have lost strategically but they won the economic war. After 1975 they launched economic sanctions against Vietnam. After their Soviet sugar daddy collapsed the Vietnamese economy tanked. In the early nineties they were one of the poorest countries in the world until Clinton lifted sanctions.

Who will be Afghanistans new sugar daddy when the west pulls out and the Taliban take over. I don't think China will be keen to pour in money unless there is a lot in it for them.

It makes you wonder who is bank rolling the Talibans offensive at the moment. It must cost a lot of money. Is it still the Pakistani ISI?
I was wondering the same thing, who is backing the Taliban now? We know who backed them in the past but who is providing them with all that ordnance that they are currently expending now? Did they save it up over the years waiting for this opportunity? If that is the case then the ANA might have a chance if they can just hold out long enough.
 
Best of luck you two.
I was in Afghanistan very early on, before the initial surge. It sounds like it's reverting to those times, I suppose that particular Leopard really can't change it's spots.
When you say reverting to those times before the surge, do you mean relatively peaceful?
there was a time in the early 00s you could mince around without body armour in a soft skinned vehicle.

before the surge Kabul had a thriving nightlife for western civvies.

some of us briefed the surge was going to be a mistake. Some of us were able to brief the same people and demonstrate that the surge had in fact been a mistake.
 
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